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Biloxi Daily Herald Newspaper Archive: April 12, 1884 - Page 1

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Publication: Biloxi Daily Herald

Location: Biloxi, Mississippi

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   Biloxi Daily Herald (Newspaper) - April 12, 1884, Biloxi, Mississippi                                 1 TT Hf ¿Ff «gVîff; f "  INSIDE  Women's Page.........Pg 31  Entertainments... Pg; 14-15  Sports..........,....;.......Pg. 47  Classified Adv........Pg. 56  Serving Biloxi-Gulfport and the Mississippi Coast Since 1884  Served By Associated Press  Volume 89 - Nuntor 190  ■» 1  .."itii 1  ■ ' "i' .  Mississippi Coast, Thursday Aftertioon, April 12,197a  A Secti<ms, 6Q Pages  A little warmer today and tonight. Widely scattered shower« Friday. Highs today mfd 60s north to low 70s south. Lows tonight low 40s north to up» per 40s near the cost. Details on Pg. 27.  Copy W  for ¡  WASHINGTON (AP) — President Nixon asked Congress today to provide minimum standards for unemployment insurance to assure that workers would receive at least half their average weekly wage whea eligible for unemployment benefits.  Nixon, in a message to Congress, also called for extending unemployment coverage to some 635,000 agricultural workers, with Safeguards to insure aid to migrant workers as well. Nixon said he also wanted a third major change in the unemployment insurance system "to preserve the neutrality" of the system during labor disputes.  He said the payment of unem-  Senate anti-busing  WASHINGTON (AP) - A Senate committee winds up hearings today on ,a proposed constitutional amendment banning busing—a measure that may have moved from one burying ground to another.  Chairman James O. Eastland of the Senate Judiciary Committee has rescued the proposal from a quiet death in Sen. Birch Bayh's constitutional amendments subcommittee.  But Eastland's action in recalling six similar proposed amendments to the full committee for formal hearings this week may do nothing more than give busing fees the Senate forum they have been demanding.  Senate sources say they detect little interest in pushing the proposal to the floor for a vote.  It's up to Eastland, D-Miss r , whether to press even for a committee vote. His aides say they don't know what he plans to do  ployment insurance benefits to strikers and denying benefits to non-strikers in a labor dispute should be ended»  Nixon said he is urging Congress to act promptly on the proposed reforms at a time when U.S. civilian employment is at a record high of 83.9 million workers and with the rate of unemployment down to 5 per cent and likely to decline further this year.  "Difficult as it may be to live by the old saw," Nixon said, "a sunny day remains the best time to fix a leaky roof."  He said it is "of urgent importance" to extend unemployment insurance coverage to as many agricultural employes as can be  once the committee hearings end.  Familiar arguments were offered by both sides during the hearing Wednesday, but few of the 16 committee members were there to hear witnesses.  Eastland opened the session« left midway through the morning testimony, and returned alone for an afternoon session delayed more than an hour.  Sen. Quentin Burdick, D-N.D., was the sole member present for much of the morning session.  The amendments, if they had remained in Bayh's subcommittee, probably would have been buried without a hearing. The Indiana Democrat had refused demands for hearings from antibusing forces.  One source close to the committee said Eastland had been under continuous pressure from Sen. Bill Brock, R-Tenn., to .conduct full committee hearings.  Ellsberg tells jury of copying papers  LOS ANGELES (AP) — Daniel Ellsberg, vividly describing his journey to disillusionment in Vietnam, is expected to tell jurors today how he risked his government career to copy the Pentagon papers in hopes of ending the war.  Testifying in his own defense Wednesday. Ellsberg portrayed himself as a true believer in the war in Vietnam who became sick when he saw first hand that U.S. policies in Southeast Asia were futile.  Ellsberg and Anthony Russo, both former employes of the Rand Corp., are charged with espionage,  conspiracy and theft for admittedly copying the papers, a top secret study of U.S. involvement in Vietnam, a study Ellsberg later leaked to news media.  Ellsberg broke down and sobbed during a recess Wednesday after describing to the jury his experiences during a trip to Vietnam.  "I was asked about some incidents in Vietnam that just brought back some vivid memories. I could see the faces of the Vietnamese I was describing and it was very sad," Ellsberg said later.  WASHINGTON (AP — Senate support is mounting today for a ban on continued U. S. bombing in Cambodia. A dozen Democratic senators joined in co-sponsoring separate legislation that would cut off funds for any military action in Cambodia not specifically approved by Congress.  WASHINGTON (AP) — U. S. officials are pressing quietly for the release of two Thai prisoners of war whom the North Vietnamese have refused to let go. The two men, believed to be enlisted members of the Thai army, are the last known POWs in the Indochina war.  BONN, West Germany (AP) — Talks between Czechoslovakia and West Germany to arrange for the opening of diplomatic relations resumed today with both governments signaling optimism after a 10-month deadlock.  PARIS (AP) — Ministers of the Saigon government and the Viet Cong's Provisional Revolutionary government met today for the sixth time to try to agree on an agenda failed to make any progress.  J*ARIS (AP) — France and North Vietnam agreed today to full diplomatic relations with an exchange of ambassadors. Since the 1954 Indo* china peace agreement, Prance and North Vietnam have maintained commereiai ; missions ór general diplomatic delegations in the other country's capital.  GENEVA (AP) — Sweden proposed today tliat the United States and the Soviet tintim couple their strategic arms limitation accord to a moratprium on underground testing to lead the Geneva disar* mament conference put of its present impésse.  .■ ■ - » f*  1  - ■ ' . s '' i-i v . » ij! . dV'- J- --V-J-- . « '  • -F  I  accommodated in the system. He said he knows Congress shares his concern that agricultural workers "are too frequently excluded from the rights and protections afforded workers in other industries."  He asked for prompt action "so ^ that we can begin rectifying the injustice."  "We cannot in good conscience," he said, "defer this action any longer. •  Nixon asked the states in July 1969 to improve their benefits to meet his suggested half-pay minimum. However, he said, more than two-fifths of all workers now covered by the unemployment insurance system find their benefits limited by state ceilings at a lower level.  "We simply cannot be content with this situation any longer," Nixon said. "The time has come for federal action."  He proposed that: "Every eligible insured worker, when unemployed, must be paid a benefit equal to at least 50 per cent of his average weekly wage up to a state maximum which shall be at least two-thirds of the average weekly wage of covered workers in the state."  He said this would assure half pay to at least 80 per cent of insured unemployed workers. Nixon estimated that the cost of his proposed new requirement would be an average increase of 50 per cent to the state-pooled unemployment insurance funds.  Congress, which included most of Nixon's employment- security proposals in a 1970 law to extend coverage to six million workers, postponed action on recommendations to extend agricultural labor coverage.  He said the results of the 1970 law "conclusively demonstrate the administrate«*! fliifuuiial feasibility of exreranjf unemployment insurance coverage to approximately 66,000 agricultural enterprises employing some 635,000 agricultural workers."  He said his proposal would bring under the system any farm operator who employs four or more workers in each of ¿0 weeks in a calendar year, or who pays wages for agricultural labor of at least $5,000 in a calendar quarter.  The change, however, would not take effect until Jan. 1, 1975 to allow state legislatures to make the necessary adjustments in their laws.  Safeguards, he said, are being included to insure that migrant workers will not be disqualified because of the special problems associated with keeping their records and tax collections.  Watergate probers grill aides  WASHINGTON (AP — The Watergate grand jury appears to be investigating allegations of Republican spying and undercover disruptions that went beyond the break-in and bugging of Democratic national headquarters.  Questioned Wednesday were former White House aides Dwight Chapin and Gordon Strachan and a California attorney, Donald Se-gretti.  Both Chapin and Strachan have been linked in various published accounts to allegations of political spying and sabotage. Three lawyers have said that Segretti tried to recruit the three for political espionage against the Democrats. According to anHFBI report made public in Senate hearing,. Segretti received more than $30,000 in Nixon re-election campaign funds from Herbert Kalmbach, the President's personal lawyer. Kalm-bach told the FBI he acted at Chapin's request. Last Feb; 7 the New York Times reported that Strachan made the initial White House contact with Segretti.  The Washington Post said in today's edition» that, convicted .Watergate Oobspirater . James ,W. McCord Jr. told the jury he was advised that trflk^ri^ of wiretapped 0i?ftpcra$2 W^rs* tiohs former  Ji  mtewni-  any prior knowledgroft$e Watergate V-* j.  / '  / *  ' Jftw 4' / ' / pwrh vV'ft  ■■ •> •• / • »  ■ < ■ ' *  // ' s;-  'fwrfr,.  No emotions, please.  Nancy Hall, foreground, a wrapper in the meat de- sign on wall cautions customers with a tongue-in-partment of a supermarket in suburb north of Chi- cheek admonition.  cago, arranges wares in display freezer, while a (AP Wirephoto)  Authorities remain silent  on  By TIM KBIEHN Daily Herald Staff Writer An investigation by federal' authorities into posible kickbacks between at least one equipment company and county supervisors in Mississippi has resulted in two indictments on perjury and obstructing justice.  However, federal authorities Wednesday declined comment on the investigation.  Guerrillas search for American in raid  Paul G. Kratzig, special attorney. New Orleans Strike Force, who signed the latest indictment, said he would net answer questions concerning grand jury proceedings.  He declined comment on when he thought the investigation would conclude. He also declined to comment on which supervisors are involved in the investigation.  BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP) -—The Palestinian guerrilla command is reported searching for an American they believe was involved in the Israeli raid on Beirut. They launched a hunt Wednesday for persons who aided in the attack, and, reliable informants said a Frenchman was captured.  The Lebanese government said holders of British, German and Belgian passports rented the six cars the Israelis used in the raid. The government said the Europeans had not left the country through its airport or border posts "so it is presumed they left with the Israeli commandos."  But Yasir Arafat of the A1 Fatah guerrillas said: "There is evidence that some elements are still in Beirut. They did not leave with the attacking force. They stayed behind, probably to plan other attacks."  Arafat accused the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency of helping the Israelis in their attack Tuesday in which three other A1 Fatah leaders were assassinated.  In Washington, Secretary of State William P. Rogers said in a statement Wednesday night that Palestinian allegations about U.S. involvement in the raids were "a  plain lie." State Department  spokesman  Robert J. McCloskey also said in the U.S. capital that the charge "is of serious concern to the United States government." Police reinforcement» were ordered out today to guard against violence at the funerals of the three guerrilla leaders — Mohammed Yussef Najjar, Kamal Nasser and Kammal Ad-wan. Hundreds of students tried Wednesday to march on the U.S. Embassy and the U.S. information Agency library, tyt the police scattered them repeatedly.  Sidon; 24 miles south of Beirut, where a group of Israeli raiders blew up a guerrilla garage Tuesday, wa? the scene of another demonstration Wednesday. Police there made repeated baton charges before they dispersed a crowd of about 3;000 who met the charges with volleys of stones  In Tripoli, 50 miles north of Beirut, several thousand marchers chanted anti-Israeli and anti-American slogans, but no violence was reported.  The Egyptian press joined in the anti-American chorus today.  A1 Ahram said the United States "cannot be relieved of responsibility toward continued Israeli aggression and particularly the latest crime."  The second publishable indictment from the probe is that of Harvey B. Jarrett, a sales manager for Allied Equipment Inc., on counts of perjury and obstructing justice. He is free on $1,000 bond following an appearance Monday before U.S. Magistrate John Coun-tiss in JackSon.  His indictment was one of 22 handed down by a special grand jury in a partial report issued in Biloxi April 5. Nineteen of the indictments have- not been made public.  Kratzig would not comment when asked if any of the other indictees were supervisors.  The grand jury was empaneled Jan. 11, 1972, and has served also in March 1972, January 1973, February 1973 and the first week of April. It is expected to meet again in June.  The indictment of Jarrett is the second made against an employe of the Jackson-based equipment firm. In January, of this year, the same grand jury indicted - Hugh P. Ellard, a salesman, on three counts each for perjury and obstruction of justice,  Some of the counts against Ellard involved testimony he made denying ever paying cash money to supervisors.  The two counts against Jarrett are similar in nature to Ellard's. In the first count,. Jarrett is charged with giving false testímo-ney while in the second count he is charged with obstructing justice by giving false and evaisive an-(Continued on Page 15)  WASHINGTON (AP) - Facing almost certain defeat in their drive for v a tough, price-rollback bill, House Democratic leaders huddle today to seek: a compromise or a temporary extension of the exist-■ ing economic-control law. ' Tentative agreement. was reached Wednesday, on a 60-day ext$nsionof the .president's discretionary control powers which ex~ 11 30. , ^¡agreement was reached Banking Committee mfea*  into  law cpuld be passed by the House without vRulcs Committee clear-anoè next Monday, but it could not be l^id^^  Theextension was designed to give the-Banking Committee time to draftanew bill tosoften opposition from farrnerSj, cattlemen and some buslneSsgroups.  HAMILTON, Bermuda (AP) — The government is moving to ban thè private ownership of guns on Bermuda ~ including toy guns that look like real ones — until the end of this year.  This British; colony 600 miles east of thjp Carolinas has been the scene of five rnim&rs ih the last seven months and six armed hold-VPS so, far this year. The British goVeriior; Sir Richard Sharpies, and his ajde, Capt. Hug* Sayers. were assassinated outside Government House fri March and two men were killed last weekend While counting their supermarket èipts. -—■'  1  A 45-year-old Winging woman became the Coast's 19th traffic futility since Jan. V of this year. She wa* kHfed VtMiw#&a.y night in a off* ear ttpcident oft Sittti»l«ifl»>y2tatWigginii v By comparison, prtMin» hud dled on Coast highways as of April It,  tm.  (Story on Page 17)  h  *y   

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