Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Biloxi Daily Herald: Wednesday, September 16, 1874 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Biloxi Daily Herald (Newspaper) - September 16, 1874, Biloxi, Mississippi                                 The Daily Herald  Served By Associated Press  Serving Biioxi-Guifport and the Mississippi Coast Since 1884  Volume 90 - 374  Mississippi Coast, Monday Afternoon September 16, 1974  2 Sections, 26 Pages  Single Copy 10'  President Ford announces  plan to implement clemency  WASHINGTON (AP) — Presi dent Ford proclaimed a clemency program today for thousands of Vietnam war deserters and draft registers "in furtherance of our national commitment to justice and mercy."  A key feature of the program would require deserters and draft evaders to spend up to 24 months in low-paying jobs judged to promote the "national health, safety or interest." There would be no minimum time period for "alternate service jobs" and reductions from the 24 months service period would be dependent on military service records and "other mitigating factors."  All those wanting to accept the amnesty opportunity would have to turn themselves in before Jan. 31. Draft evaders would report to the United States attorney where an  offense was committed and deserters would report to appropriate military commanders.  Ford also set up a nine-member Presidential Clemency Board to handle the cases of those already convicted of draft evasion or absence from military service.  "The board has been instructed to give priority consideration to individuals currently confined," the White House press office said in a fact sheet. "The President also has asked that their confinement be suspended as soon as possible, pending the board's review."  Ford briefed Republican and Democratic leaders of Congress before making details of the clemency program public.  "It is not amnesty," House Republican Leader John Rhodes said after the briefing. "It sets forth a  mechanism under which these young men can rehabilitate themselves ..."  Senate Republican Whip Robert Griffin of Michigan said most participants in the briefing were pleased with the make-up of the clemency board.  However, both Rhodes and Griffin acknowledged that some congressional leaders at the meeting voiced opposition to Ford's action.  All participants in the program would have to acknowledge allegiance to the United States.  Those ,who shun the program or do not satisfactorily complete their part of the clemency offer would be subject to prosecution.  Ford, in explaining his move, said in the proclamation:  "In furtherance of our national commitment to justice and mercy these young Americans should  For Gulfport courthouse  Special election called  VICKI SALLOUM Herald Staff Writer  The Harrison County Board of Supervisors Monday voted to call a third election Nov. 5 for the issuance of $4 million in bonds for the construction of a First Judicial District courthouse in Gulfport.  Supervisor Rimmer Simpson said the board had discussed the  matter thoroughly and reached what the board considered the best decision.  A June 4 courthouse election, which carried by 62.9 per cent, was invalidated because legal notice of the election was not published.  Following that election, a citizens committee had given the supervisors a petition bearing 4,100 which called for a new election.  Turkish premier reveals resignation intentions  ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Premier Bulent Ecevit announced today he would resign in the next few days because of a split in his coalition cabinet.  Ecevit said he would submit his resignation to President Fahri Ko-ruturk after consulting Tuesday with officials of his Republican People's party. Koruturk is expected to ask Ecevit to remain as premier and form a new government.  Ecevit, a national hero since Turkey's triumphal invasion of Cyprus, expressed belief that "new elections should be held as soon as possible." He said the formation of a new government would be easier if it were to be in office only until elections were held.  Conflict between Ecevit and the  allied National Salvation party has been brewing for some time. The premier said recently that there were "almost irreconcilable differences" between the Salvationists, an orthodox Moslem party, and his own leftist Republican People's party.  Two days ago Deputy Premier Necmettin Erbakan, the leader of the Salvationists, said his party would not endorse a visit Ecevit is scheduled to make to Scandinavia.  Ecevit's party is the largest in the National Assembly with 185 of the 450 seats. The' Salvationists have 49 seats.  The coalition was formed eight months ago after elections that failed to give any party a majority in the assembly.  ? Today  Ford conference tonight  WASHINGTON (AP) — President Ford will hold a news conference to be broadcast on television and radio from the East Room at 7 p.m. CDT today, a spokesman said.  Cypriots exchange prisoners  NICOSIA, Cyprus (AP) — Greek and Turkish Cypriots exchanged sick and wounded prisoners today in the first major release of captive since the cease-fire a month ago. Most of the freed captives — 129 Turkish Cypriots and 116 Greek Cypriots — were civilians and all appeared in good condition. The two sides have not yet agreed on a full prisoner release, but teen-agers, students, teachers, doctors and men over 50 are to be freed after all sick and wounded have been exchanged.  Brooklyn blaze controlled  NEW YORK (AP) - Fire raged through a vacant pier and warehouse at Bush Terminal on Brooklyn's waterfront early today, threatening for a time to spread to several barges filled with crude oil. Commercial tugs and Coast Guard boats towed the barges to safety in open water, and the blaze was under control in an hour.  Bod news, Sweet Tooth  WASHINGTON (AP) — Candy bar lovers are in for a jolt: manufacturers plan to raise the price of vending machine bars to 20 cents. The increase, on the heels of a jump from 10 to 15 cents with little or no change in candy bar size, is the result of record high cocoa bean prices and higher cost of other ingredients such as sugar, nuts and milk.  Weather  Winds mostly easterly with chance of rain tonight. Page 5  Index  Nixon's health critical......................................Page 6  Soviet art destroyed........................................Page 8  Daily Living........................................................Poge 10  Am Landers.......................................................Poge ''  Entertainment....................................................Page 13  Sports.................................................................Page J6  Comics, Horoscope...........................................Poge 21  The Aces bridge................................................Poge 21  Classified...........................................................Poge 22  Two weeks ago, a hearing was called by the supervisors to determine the validity of the petitions. At question was the wording of the petition, and the supervisors were to decide whether to issue the bonds or call a new election.  At the hearing, Stanford Morse, attorney for the New Courthouse Committee, said the petitions were "substantially permiated with irregularities," and only one petition protested the issuance of bonds as required by. law.  At Monday morning's meeting, Simpson, who moved to call the new election, made the following statement:  "The election which we had June 4 was approved by 62.9 per cent of the vote, but the election was determined to be illegal. There were four petitions presented and although there was some question as to the validity of the petitions, however, there were in excess of 1,500 names on the petition that are valid.  "We acknowledge that the New Courthouse Committee contributed $10,000 for advertising on the last election, which also cost the county $10,000. We hate to put the county through another election, but I've got to move to call another election on the courthouse...."  The supervisors passed Simpson's motion unanimously and set Nov 5 as the date of the new election.  Port, industry  continuing  negotiations  RICHARD GLACZIER  Herald Staff Writer  Negotiations continued this week between the Port of Gulfport and a newly-formed Mississippi corporation which proposes to export wood chips to Japan.  The new industry, which is reported to be promising up to 300 jobs at the state-owned port, is named Gulf Chips, Inc., and is headed by James Beasley of Port Gibson.  The project has already gained the favor of both the Mississippi State Port Authority at Gulfport and the Mississippi Agricultural & Industrial Board executive committee.  Gulf Chips, Inc. and Mitsui & Co. (USA), Inc., the Japanese affiliate which proposes to buy the wood chips for the manufacture of paper, are proposing to back the state bonds necessary to build facilities at the port. The facilities would, in turn, be leased by Gulf Chips, Inc. The amount of the bonds needed was not immediately available.  Wood chips are normally produced in the field where mammoth machines are used in the harvesting process and literally eat up an entire tree and transfer the chips into a truck.  In similar operations inspected recently by port officials in Washington state, the chips are piled in open storage and then loaded onboard ship by conveyor systems.  The facilities at Gulfport, which are anticipated to provide the port with up to $200,000 annually in tariff fees, would be located in the open field between the harbor and U.S. Highway 90 just east of the extension of 30th avenue.  Japan, with its high population and industrial output compared to its limited forest productions has a great demand for wood to use as paper pulp.  Port authority President William Mosley said this morning he was going to Jackson today regarding the matter. Some result is expected this week.  have the chance to contribute a share to the rebuilding of peace among ourselves and with all nations. They should be allowed the opportunity to earn return to their country, their communities and their families, upon their agreement to a period of alternate service in the national interest, together with an acknowledgement of their allegiance to the country and its Constitution."  Ford described desertion in wartime as a "major, serious offense" and draft evasion as "a serious offense."  "Reconciliation among our people does not require that these acts be condoned," he added. "Yet, reconciliation calls for an act of mercy to bind the nation's wounds and to heal the scars of devisiveness." Officials said approximately 15,500 draft evaders are potentially eligible for clemency. Of these about 8,700 already have been convicted, an additional 4,350 are under indictment and 2,250 are under investigation.  Of those under indictment. 4,060 are listed as fugitives and an estimated 3,000 of them are in Canada.  Officials said 130 persons are presently serving prison sentences for draft evasion and presumably are eligible for release pending reviews of their cases by the clemency board.  The officials said some 500,000 incidents of desertion falling within the scope of the clemency program were recorded during the Vietnam war. They said approximately 12,500 deserters are still at large with about 1,500 of them in Canada.  The President's proclamation specified that evaders or deserters wanted on charges other than those associated with avoidance of military service might be forced to have fhe other charges disposed of before clemency would be considered.  Computer teaching. .  Children at Gaston Point Elementary School in Gulfport are using a computer to learn their lessons. They are Ramona Ray  Staff photo by Vernon Matthews  and ray Cuevas, both seven-year-olds. The learning specialists assisting are Mrs. Beth Ar-nold and Mrs. Angela W'indisch.  Gulf pori school program uses computers to teach  JIMMIE BELL Herald Staff Writer  Will computers ever take the place of teachers in the classroom?  They just might, if a program underway in Gulfport schools proves to be successful.  The CAI, a Computer Assisted Instructor, all mechanical and about the size of a small ice box, will keep a student programmed to study a pre-arranged set of subjects, and then collect feedback from the child on how he is doing, while he is doing it.  It further computes his learning capabilities, his ability to absorb and retain and finally prints out a full report or. everything in 10 minutes.  Dr. Ray Bishop, assistant superintendent, said the CAI has been  leased from a company in California for trial on a pilot basis at Gaston Point Elementary School.  Bishr,,: efers to the CAI as a macb at in essence does what it is i )ut he says it does it so thorou"»-'ny and so quickly that it can do the work of several human testers in a fraction of the usual time.  Bishop, using unflattering terms, calls it "a restricted computer," but avows that CAI has built into its low-key brain a set of "memory instructional strands."  Each strand is able to accept and transmit great detail in the fields of reading, mathematics, language arts or adult basic education.  With eight terminals to begin with and 30 planned in the future, the CAI can teach and analyze eight students at a time. Each student will be on the CAI for 10 min  utes a day in drill, practice and instruction.  The CAI, as a teletypewriter, it will type out its own questions, await the answer from the student, who then types his "reply." If the question is answered correctly, CAI moves on to the next one.  But if the answer is incorrect, CAI "computes around" for a split second or two and then re-phrases the question.  Then the CAI spells out Johnny's or Mary's learning potential. At that point, the school administrators know how apt the student will be in his present learning style and if changes are to be recommended.  Students are advised not to get too interested in the 10-minute learning deal. It doesn't mean a student can learn all he needs to for a whole day in 10 minutes.  Only the CAI can do that.  Party chooses first woman leader  GOP selects chairman  WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican National Committee today unanimously elected Mrs. Mary Louise Smith, a veteran party organizer chosen 12 days ago by President Ford, as the party's first woman national chairman.  The 59-year-old Mrs. Smith, who as party cochairman for the pa, c six months ran a series of GOP grassroots workshops, succeeds George Bush, named to head the U.S. liaison office in the People's Republic of China.  The election of Mrs. Smith was the major item of business at the commit tee meeting, which also in-cluded a luncheon with addresses by President Ford and Vice Presidentdesignate Nelson A. Rockefeller.  There was no public opposition to Mrs. Smith, though some RNC members were reported privately annoyed that, once again, their new chairman had been selected by a President without their playing any role besides ratification.  Mrs. Smith, who has been Republican national com-mitteewoman from Io wa since 1964, was formally nominated by state GOP Chairman John McDonald. McDonald called her "a skilled diplomat" and a "tough bargainer'" and declared that "her know ledge of organization has earned her a reputation as a keen tactician."  Bush, in a farewell speech, predicted the Republicans "will do  better in the fall elections than many people think — particularly in the Senate."  But he said "I am not satisfied at where we stand in strength of numbers of registered voters or in strength of national committee."  He defended his national chairmanship,. in which he made many speeches defending former President Richard M. Nixon.  Bush contended that "all of us wanted to be fair" in defending« Nixon's accomplishments while protecting the GOP "from the ugly excesses and the illegalities that became known by one word—Watergate."  Party Treasurer O. C. Car-michael Jr. of Indiana presented a report showing the national committee had a balance of $1.7 million as of Aug. 31, having raised more than $6 million this year, 83 per cent of it from small donors.  Ford had outlined his reasons for selecting Mrs. Smith at a White  Hou^e breakfast today with an eight-member nominating committee of the Republican group.  A self-styled "mrbderate conservative," she was first elected Republican national com-mitteewoman from Iowa in 1964. She told reporters she was not part of the movement that brought Sen. Barry Gold water of Arizona the Republican presidential nomination that year.  In 1968, when she was a Republican National Convention delegate supporting Nixon, she was reelected national commit-teewoman and named to the party's executive committee.  Last Spring, she organized a series of party workshops to build grassroots support for GOP candidates this fall. She said she hopes to combine political organizing with public speaking on behalf of the Ford administration.  46  A 19-year-old North Biloxi woman was killed about 2:10 a.m. Monday when the car she was driving on Old Highway 90 in North Biloxi ran off the road and struck a post. She was the 46th person to die in a traffic acc'h dent on the Mississippi Coast since Jan. I. Story is on Page 8.  J   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 155+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 155+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 155 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication