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Biloxi Daily Herald: Saturday, June 30, 1832 - Page 1

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   Biloxi Daily Herald (Newspaper) - June 30, 1832, Biloxi, Mississippi                                 ASSOCIATED PRESS LEASED WIRE—SEA SERVICE  HERALD BUILDING, BILOXI  MISSISSIPPI COAST, THURSDAY AFTERNOON, JUNE SO, 2932  HERALD BUILDING, GULFPORT  33c A WEEK—VOLUME XXXIV—NUMBER 273E.  NOMINATING SPEECHES BEGIN AFTER ADOPTION OF PLATFORM  HOOVER SIGNS ECONOMY BILL, CRITICISES IT  President Says Measure Falls Far Short of Administration's Proposal; Has Objectionable Features.  Here Are Leaders of War Debt Conference  Washington. June «0.—OP)—President Hoover tufiav .signed into law the much-debated and battle-scarred national economy- bill, estimated to save ;.r und .?t">U,OUO,<JOO in govern-  •m"iit expenditures.  In signing the measure, the chief oxif'itivp sa ill he dici so with "limited fa' ¡-flirt ion.''  Il- add'd ¡be measure ''falls far short of the economi"* proposed'' by the ixlminiMrat ion. He objected also to tiic measure's lack of authorization for abolishing and consolidating government ilupaus.  The measure. .Mr. Hoover said, '"impose* ünii"f-e.-sar.v hardships on government employes in minor meters of lit lie c"i]-eqiif ne» economically."  He advanced a promise, however, that every eil'orf would he made to ;i 1 lev¡;i;e the difficulties and hardships to f--der.il employes upon whom the e«-- ini;tt-'i saving is inaile.  Here are four of the leading figures at the Genera reparation» conference. Left to right, they are Signor Antonio Moseoni. Italian financier; Baron Franz von Papen, German chancellor; Prime Minister Ramsay Mac-Donald of England, who was elected president of the conference, and and Premier Edouard Herriot ot" France. Their first move was to extend the moratorium on reparations.  AMENDMENTS TO PLATFORM VOTffl DOWN  Flow of Oratory Begins as Nominators Start Placing Nine Names On List of Presidential Possibilities.  CONGRESS RUSHES WORK  Wa.-hington. June :>0.—(VP;—Its legislative prgram just about compieteli—except f«r relief—Congress  today plunged anew into a vigorous ele.m-u¡i campaign, rushing toward completion minor problems that siood in the way of .adjournment.  The Sena le, after passing nil the regular appn priation bills, took up relatively inconsequential measures before resuming consideration of Philippine independence. The House, its penerai program definitely finished except for the money bills in conference. marked time.  There was a hope early in the day that all these appropriations bills ex-rept ¡hat for the war department would he at the White House before the new - financial year dawned at midnight tonight.  Iw-■ Iìef <*onfere«s steadily if slowly approached a compromise on the $2.-"OO.OOfUiOO program. They indicated the compieirjì bill would allow $300,-(MKi.(K)il for immediate relief; $1,300.-(it>(),()( 10 for construction loans through the reeonstruction finance corporation and 10,000.000 for public  works.  TRIAL BRINGS OUT MORE OF CURTIS STORY  Norfolk Man Told of Baby's Sickness and Said He Was Treated By Doctor Sworn to Secrecy.  VOTE OX REPEAL  Chicago. J.-ne "O.—i.Pi—the roll call on adopt in of the minority plank on prohibition was as follows, the ''aye'' votes favoring a re-ubmission pit:nk and the "no" votes favoring a repeal plank. No. of votes state.  24 Alabama aye 21 no 3.  fi Arizona (> aye 0 no.  IS Arkansas 3" aye no 5.  •11 California aye 11 no 33.  12 Colorado aye 1 no 11.  If! Connecticut aye 1-4 no 13 3-4.  I] Delaware aye 4 no 2.  14 Florida aye 1 no 1".  2 s ! Georgia aye 2S no 0.  ."V Illinois aye 0 no 3^.  30 Indiana aye 0 no :!0.  X Idaho aye 0 no S.  20 Iowa aye II no 2t!.  20 Kansas aye 12 no S.  20 Kentucky aye 0 no 26. 2(1 Louisiana aye ."5 no 17. 2(1 Mi-sissippi aye 20 no 0. 3 2 Maine aye 2 no 1".  1U Maryland aye 0 no 36. eii Massaehusei j.s aye (1 no "6. Michigan aye 0 no "S.  21 Minnesota aye } m> 12 absent.) :Ui M -- uri aye 7 3-2 no 28 1-2.  S Montana a.\e 0 no S. It! Nebraska aye ."> no 0. (1 !■■ fusing, 1 absent.) o Nevada aye 0 no 0. ^ Nfiv Hampshire a.ve 0 no S. 32 New .1 e; soy aye 0 no .",2. (! New Mexico aye 1 no 3. ¡1 { New York aye 0 no 04. 2'i North Car lina aye IS no 8. ]<• North Dakota nye 0 no 10. ."2 Ohio n>e 2 no -!!) il absent.)  22 Oklahoma aye 22 no 0. Ill Oregon aye 3 no 7. 70 Pennsylvania aye 0 no 70. in Rhode Island aye 0 no 10. IS S"uth Carolina aye 0 no 18. 30 South Dakota aye 0 no -4. 24 Tennessee aye (> no IS. 4('i Texas aye 0 no 40. S Utah a.ve 0 no -V S Vermont aye o no S. 24 Virginia aye .13 no 11. 10 Washington aye 11-2 no 14 1-2 10 Wot Virginia aye S 1-2 no 7.  ' 1 -2 absent. I  20 Wisi-,.n>in aye 0 110 2<>. ti Wyoming aye O no 0. Aiaska aye il no (!.  t> D'.strict of ('■duiTi!-i;\ a; e 0 no 6. 0 Hawaii-aye 0 no (>.  ! > r'niliopin-s aye O no 0. 1» Po'.to IJien aye 0 no 0. 0 Canal 7.one a.ve <1 n-. 0. 2 Virgin I-huui aye O no 2. Totals 213 3-i ayes 0313--$ iio s .  Flemirigton. N. Y., June 30—(JP)— A statement was read into the court record today in which John Hughes Curtis said that the Lindbergh baby sickened after being kidnaped and was treated by a doctor who was pledged to secrecy under pain of death.  Curtis is on trial for hindering capture of the kidnapers and today an attempt by his attorneys to have a mistrial declared failed.  Captain John J. Lamb of the New Jersey state - police read a lengthy statement Curtis made on the second and third days after the baby was found dead.  In this statement Curtis said the baby, who was suffering from a cold when he was stolen became -sick shortly afterwards.  A doctor was called in by the kidnapers, he said, and .the child was given medical attention. The physician was permitted to leave, Curtis continued, after the baby recovered, but he was warned that if he told about his contacts with the kidnapers and the kidnaped baby he would be killed. The doctor was said to have (Continued on page six)  Germany Not to Make Bond For U. S. Payments  Lausanne, Switzerland, June 30.— G4 3 )—Germany refused today to agree to a suggestion by France that she deposit a 6,000.000,000 mark bond with the World Bank in lieu of reparations annuities, pending negotiations of revised debt agreements with the United States.  Baron Konstantiu von Neurath, the German foreign minister, communicated the negative reply to Prime Minister MacDonuld of Greut Britain after having consulted with the rest of the German delegation and his cabinet colleagues in Berlin.  One-third of the amount would have been Germany's contribution to a general fund for the economic reconstruct of Europe. The remainder would be set aside pending negotiation of revised debts agreements with the United States.  Under the safeguard clause Germany would still be held liable for reparations in the event that the United States refused to reduce the debts owed her by the World War allies.  Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald of Great Britain pleaded with the Germans to accept the proposal, as-miring them that they need have no fear with regard to American generosity.  Harrison Countian Flees From Prison  Jackson, June 30.—OP)—Officers today were searching for .Toe Long, 40, Harrison county, serving a 20-year manslaughter sentence, who escaped from the Oakley penal farm, according to word received at penitentiary headquarters here.  Long's escape is the third of the ni'-nth from the Oakley farm. Officers still are seeking H. C. Garrett, Warren county, and Will Napier, Lamar countian, who fled earlier in the month. Long was committed to the penitentiary December 10. 1027, according to prison records. He is about five feet four inches tall, weighs 140 pounds, has brown eyes, ruddy complexion and gray hair, and carries a scar on his left cheekbone-, according to prison data.  STRESS WORTH OF NEW BANK  Speakers Point Out Difference to Gulfport Between New Bank and Liquidation.  With only a few committees reporting. it was announced early this afternoon that some 175 creditors' agreements had been signed since Wednesday's luncheon.  Long was indicted by a Harrison county grand jury on a charge of murder in connection with the killing of his wife, Emma Long, with a hatchet in Biloxi. He pleaded guilty to manslaughter and was sentenced to serTe 20 j-rars in the state penitentiary.  SMITH NOT TO QUIT  Chicago. June 30—(/P>—A denial of a rumor that he intended to withdraw from the race for the Democratic nomination was coupled today by Alfred Kmmanuel Smith with the assertion: "I am not only going to stick but I am going to be nominated.''  TODAY'S  GAM  _It-  Body of Missing Taxi Driver Found  Coiumbns. Miss.. Juno 30.—t.-P)— The body uf Tom L. Dowdle. 3(»-year-old :n\i "'¡¡v.r. was found today and inieer- e\prr»M'i.! the belief he had been taken for a ride and »lain.  AMERICAN LEAGUE  New York.....< . .303 3 1."» (I  Bestrtll ......... .000 001 1  MacFayden and Jorgens ; Michaels.  J;=bloliow.-ki and Tate.  Homer: C I lef oil .... Cleveland ..  lisi). lioerner Miih.)  ;ii!>= liihi. . ... Oit .....(HI  Sorrell and Hayworth; Ferrei! and Myatt.  NATIONAL LEAGUE  Brooklyn ........000 01  Philadelphia......022 04  Mungo, Shame (.Ith) and Lopez; Benge and V. Davis.  Homers: Lee i2nd) and O'Doul (,3th) ; Klein (óthl.  ____120 o  ____loi 1  Ma neu»" : M  (.Ith) :  Ile !¡a<¡ ¡o - n nr-»:ng m'iu-c ia-t Sat-ook a strauber int"  uriiay when he the country.  The body was found three miles from AliceviHe, Ala., in the Toinbig-bee river swamps by a searching party. I)-..wiile had been mining since last Saturday morning when he left here in his uixi in company with a 30-year-oid stranger who asked him to driw him aboa: »¡x utile« southeast of here on the A'.icevillc road. A cor- j Dowdle had no known enemies, but it oner's in<iue>t was to Ik- held iu j was thought he left here with au un-l'ickeus county, Ala., this afternoon, i certaiu sum of money.  Sr. I.<>i;is . • • Pittsburgh ..  Haine? and Grace.  f!">.["ji .......  New York . .  a mi  .....(«m m  ......Uhi iì2  Brandt. Calimeli (4th; and Spoh-rer : Bell and Hogan.  Homers: Berger (4th) ; Terry (4th) and Lindstrum (5th).  Cincinnati ......000 0  Chicago..........Oil 0  Lucas and Lombardi; Bush and Hartnett.  Responding to a general call by the Citizens Bank Committee of Gulfport, 335 citizens attended a luncheon at Hotel Markham yesterday at the noon hour at which matters relative to opening the proposal new bank were discussed.  J. W. Milner presided and in his opening statement said in part that the question of opening the new bank was a vital one. The city had no bank and some of the citizens who had come to the rescue of the only bank the city had last June had again signified their willingness to put up S360,000 more to open a new bank. They did that when the city had virtually run out of cash, he said.  The Comptroller of the Currency had approved a plan for a new bank that he thought was a fair one, and seven men in the community had subscribed $317,000 of the *360,000 required by the Comptroller of the Currency for opening the bank, and the balance had been subscribed by other small stockholders.  A surplus of SI,200.000 had been wiped out in Gulfport in the past 13 months, he said.  It was generally known what the new bank had agreed to pay, Mr. Milner said. In regard to the amount the receiver of the bank could pay depositors. Mr. Rawlings was quoted as telling the speaker and others that he could make an immediate payment of only 10 per cent. If lie could obtain a loan from the Reconstruction Finance Corporation of .««30.000 he could pay 23 per cent but lie could not negotiate the loan from the finance corporation in less than 43 days, and he could not pay the depositors ?ny more until the £030,000 had been paid back to ihe finance corporation.  In order to obtain sufficient securities to borrow from Ihe Reconstruction Finance Corporation, said Mr.; Milner. the receiver would have to | p.-y what thp Gulfport bank owed to the New Orleans banks, which would take virtually all of the cash on hand at the present time.  Relative to getting money from the stockholders. Mr. Milner stated that the stockholders would have DO days' notice before money could be received from them, and that it was his belief that on account of certain conditions, it might be considerably longer than 00 days before much money could be realized from the stockholders.  Real liquidation had not yet c"tn-tneiic'd by the receiver, he said, and when it did he believed that a large per cent of the business men in the city would be bankrupted. He dreaded to think of rhis feature of the ease, he said.  He was gratified to see the response that had been made to the request of the Citizens Bank Committee, and thought it was a good sign for the  EIGHT KILLED IN COLLISION OF TWO CARS  Torches Used to Cut Through Steel Wreckage and Reach Bodies of Victims; Many Suffer Injuries.  Hamilton 0., .Tune ,30—(/Pi—Eight persons were killed in the collision of a passenger and a freight car of the Cincinnati and Lake Erie Traction Company near Trenton, north of here, this morning.  The passenger car northbound from Hamilton smashed head-on with a southbound freight.  Crews with torches were rushed to the scene to burn through the steel wreckage.  The wreck occurred at about 7 o'clock this morning. Two hours later workmen had recovered four bodies, while those of four other victims were seen beneath the tangle of steel wreckage.  The first four whose bodies were recovered were: Joseph Brosey, Hamilton, operator of the passenger car.  Harry P.. Augsburger. Trenton; Russell Wilson, Hamilton; George Betz, Hamilton.  One of those still to be reached was identified as Jack Augsburger, son of Harry Augsburger.  The bodies were taken to Middle-town in another car. IIow many were injured was not ascertained. Report' were that the passenger car carried a dozen passengers when it left Hamilton northbound.  Traction company officials said Brosey, motorman of the passenger car, had been given orders to wait at a switch near Trenton until the southbound freight had passed. The freight, dashing southward with its motorman believing he had a clear track ahead, broke upon the passenger car .suddenly, however, and there wa>; no time to stop.  At such speed were the cars traveling that the heavy freight plunged half way through the passenger car, splitting it open and crushing passengers and equipment within beneath it.  Youth Leaps From Window of Moving Train at Jackson  Jackson. Miss,. June 30:—(JP)—A few bruises* was all Hillip Hadad. New Orleans youth had to show after a leap from a window at a speeding Illinois Central passenger train near here today.  Rail officials said the youth, without explanation, jumped through a smoking car window near Elton, on the outskirts of Jackson.  When the train arrived here local officials were notified of Hadad's act and immediately dispatched a searching party. The youth was found near the spot where lie jumped from the train, with one hand- and one foot Slightly injured.  Hadad was brought to Jackson and turned over to couniv authorities, who were making efforts to contact New Orleans relatives of the youth.  Hadad declined to explain his act. Railroad officials regarded his escap?" from death as miraculous 1 " in view of the high speed at which the train was traveling when he jumped.  GATE CRASHERS RUSH  CONVENTION ENTRANCES  Chicago. June 30.— f/P) —Gate ciashers found the going tough at the Democrat if/ o>nvention today after last night's jam in which thousands of rightful holders of tickets were denied admit ranee because  0 f others having usurped their seats.  One gate was smashed, others were thrown open by main force. "Police were pushed about and clothes were torn. A hundred reservists finally restored order.  The principal causes of the #  con-j fusion, police officials said, was forg-| ery of about 10,000 "courtesy cards'' bearing Mayor Cermak's name. Doorkeepers were given strict orders To. look for them today. Thousands, police >;.id. have been sold fo unsuspecting buyers..  William Miller wa.s arrested as one of the "courtesy card" sellers after policeman Edward Dooley bought one from him for SI.  opening of the new bank.  B. (\ Cox. secretary of the Gnlf-port Chamber of Commerce, made a short but impassioned address, saj-(Continued on page six)  DROP CHARGES  Meridian, June 30. (JP)—Charges of violating the Sunday non-working law filed in cify court against a score of men engaged in building the new post' office here have been dismissed. The Government declared the work Ws of au emergency nature.  By BYRON PRICE Chicago Stadium, June 30. (/P)— Plunging along with a rapid succession of almost unanimous decisions, Ihe Democratic convention completed approval of its platform today and turned to another interlude of oratory as a long line of speakers took up the task of putting n : ne candidates formally in nomination for the presidency.  Without roll calls and with roaring shouts of disapproval, the convention refused (o write into the platform alongside the prohibition repeal plank adopted earlier in the day. a single one of the major amendments sent up from the floor.  One of the planks voted down was for immediate payment of the soldier bonus. It wa.s smothejed under an overwhelming, rush of "nos." its sponsors being unable to muster even the number of seconds needed to insure a roll call.  The "Scotch"' bank plan of Gov. William H. Murray of Oklahoma, together with all of his other economic proposals, went out iu rapid and seemingly overwhelming votes by acclamation. So did a plank by William G. McAdoo, proposing that congress consider methods to make safe the ileposits in banks which are members of the federal reserve system.  PLANK DEBATED  The McAdoo plank alone stirred up a real flurry of debate. McAdoo himself took the platform to espouse it declaring it "in the interest of the people,'' and Senator Glass of Virginia, who like McAdoo had served Woudrow Wilson as secretary of the treasury, argued in opposition that such a proposal would greatly undermine the faith of the banking community in the Democratic party.  The only amendment adopted to the platform as it came from committee was one proposed by a woman, Miss Caroline O'Day of New York, expressing the iuterest of the party in human welfare work, particularly among children.  v   Several silver planks, proposals for home rule for Hawaii and Alaska and a number of scattering suggestions for economic programs were in the hatch of proposed amendments which the chairman pitched out the window.  As the nominating began, accompanied by its usual interlude of cheering and demonstrating for the convention favorites, it appeared that it would be well on in the evening before it ended.  The first name of all to be put before the convention was that of Franklin D. Roosevelt the eulosr of him was greeted with long 5ind loud cheers as his managers went about the floor seeking the first-ballot rush which they hoped would about tell the story.  As John E. Mack read the nominating speech in  a  soft voice, making no gestures and hardly ever speaking with emphatic tones there was much preparation anr-ng the Roosevelt states on the floor for the demonstration to come.  Huge pictures of the New York governor were unfurled and attached to various standards.  PARADE STARTS  When he pronounced the name of Roosevelt, the followers of the New Vork governor blanketed the whole delegate arena with monster lithographs and banners, and started a parade which trampled all before it as it circled dancing and shouting the vast hall.  No one cold tell who started it. New Hampshire and the District of Columbia, by virtue of their positions at the head of the center aisle got away to a running start. But they were hard pressed by Nebraska and Montana, by Georgia and by New Mexico, and by so many more that it appeared the entire c-nvention was on the march.  Georgians bore a huge placard reading: "Georgia, his Southern Home,'' Wisconsin advertised in letters a foot high, '"Wi-scon for Roosevelt." One delegate carried a placard "Prosperity and the full dinner pail, back with Roosevelt."  A discussion whether the New York standard should join in wa 3  settled in the affirmative by Dave Lee of Binghamton. He carried the New York standard away and Tammany leaders did not object. Nearly half of the entire state delegation joined the marchers, but James A. Farley— the Roosevelt manager—John F. Curry, Tammany leader, and Mayor Walker of New York kept to their seats.  The New York standard was handed over eventually to James Roosevelt, tall son of the governor, in his twenties, and he marched along jostled and buffeted by the crowds, smiling and joking.  Former Gov. Byrd and his Virginians. dose to the front of the hall stood on their chairs and watched as the marchers went by so did many in the other favorite son delegations. In the Texas delegation, however, lithographs of Speaker Garner were held high.  A.s the Indiana standard was carried past the speaker's stand Farley, still looking on from his point of vantage, gestured as if to throw a kiss to the marching hoosiers.  Many of the marchers fill out and returned t> their places after they had been at it for twenty minutes, but the organ started things tip again every time the parade began to lan-  First Candidate To Throw Support To Roosevelt May Be Given Vice Presidency  Chicago. June 30.—(JP)—A flood of | among friends of the possible candi-vice presidential candidates were be-j dales and supporters of Roosevelt,] itig put forward .today by various'! with indications that the first big | delegations, and in many quarters j favorite son state to break for the sentiment crystalizing on Speaker ; New York governor would receive John N. Gamer. j most consideration iu the naming of  The Roosevelt headquarters is re- the running mate, maining silent but friends of both the New Y'ork governor and the veteran Texas legislator are booming Garner.  Governor George- White of . Ohio i portunity ranked second choice in the talk ; uation,  while Harry Flood Byrd of Virginia! Other delegations are booming Gov-seemed to be running third. Melvin ! ernor George II. I>ern of Utah. Sena-C. Tray I or of Chicago was next. Any J tor Thomas J. Walsh of Montana, of these would throw added strength j permanent chairman of the-conven-to Roosevelt, going far toward at- | tion, Representative John McDuftie taining the necessary 770 votes for j  ( >f Alabama. Governor Ilarry H. nomination. i Woodring of Kansas, and Governor  Many conferences are being held  ;  Kitehie of Maryland.  However. Garner's manager. Representative Sam Rayburn of Texas, maintains the Texan has a good op-for the presidential nomi-  MISSISSIPPI'S VOTES WILL GO TO ROOSEVELT  State's Twenty Ballots Will Go To New Yorker On First Ballot, Bare Majority Decides.  OILING OF OST IS PROGRESSING  Some Ten Miles of the Old Spanish Trail in Hancock County Already Treated.  CLAIM 705 FOR N.Y. GOVERNOR  Roosevelt Manager Says Only 65 More Needed—Opponents Not Discouraged By Report.  The first coat of oil has been placed on about ten miles of the Old Spanish Trail between Bay St. Louis and Pearl River, according to information received today by B. C- Cox, secretary of the Gulfport Chamber of Commerce, from the Bay St. Louis' Chamber of Commerce. Eight miles of the road is yet to receive its first application of oil. Work is progressing daily. However, it is understood that the highway commission has decided not to surface three miles of the road in Bay St. Louis and the Chamber of Commerce at Bay St. Louis is trying to have this work included in the present project as originally planned.  In spite of eight miles of the untreated road still being very dusty, the road is said to be in good condition.  guisb. It looked as though the demonstration would last as long as the organist chose to keep on.  Walsh had some trouble setting the isles cleared.  ~ "I perceive that most of the delegates are in their seats." the chairman shouted. "These gentlemen in the aisles are not delegates. Please clear out. If you really feel the, need of exercise, go outside and take it. - '  Mrs. John C. Greonway of Tucson, Ariz., seconded his nomination. She stood stiffly erect behind the reading stand, hntless and in a brown dress, and delivered her speech with a voice that reached out to every far corner.  Mrs. Greenway is the national com-mitteewoman from Arizona.  She said that in seconding the nomination she spoke "as one who has known him for a long time."  By FRANCIS M. STEPHENSON Chicago, June 30. (¿P)—The first ballot of the Democratic presidential contest neared today in a last minute drive by the Roosevelt forces for the few votes they believe necessary to lift him into nomination.  Amid the activities of the presidential headquarters at the Congress Hotel, James A. Farley, manager for Governor Roosevelt, sounded a claim for 703 votes on the first ballot—63 less than the two thirds.  While Roosevelt forces were centering their attack upon Texas, Missouri and Ohio, the Mississippi delegation. which had heretofore given no indication of where it would put its 20 votes, decided to give them to the New York governor on the first bal- j expression  Chicago, June 30.—(.-P)—Mississippi's 20 votes will be cast under the unit rule for Franklin D. Roosevelt on the first ballot.  The delegation voted in caucus thi; morning 30 1-2 to 9 1-2 to support the New Y'ork governor on the first ballot aud then poll the delegation to determine whom to sivc their vote oil? the second.  The decision came at about the time that . James A. Farley, the Roosevelt manager, was estimating that his candidate would get 705 votes on the first ballot.  The estimate was 13 votes higher than that of yesterday. Farley said Indiana would deliver him 22 votes and that be also understood that Virginia was wavering.  Farley said the selection of a running mate had not been considered and would not be "until after Governor Roosevelt is nominated."  The caucus voted down 15*2- to .*U the platform plank offered by "Alfalfa Bill" Murray and supported by Congressman John Rankin, provided for payment in cash in full of the soldiers' bonus. The vote came after Mr. Rankin had addressed the delegation.  The presidential vote was taken after impassioned speeches for Roosevelt by Senator Pat Harrison aud Senator Hubert Stephens with Governor Sennett Conner and W. I* Guiee. Biloxi. speaking against Roosevelt. The governor supported Newton I>. Baker while Guiee said he wa* for any candidate other than Roosevelt.  Senator Stephens argued that the of the state convention  ROOSEVELT JLIKES PLANK  Chicago. June 30—OP)—Governor Franklyn D. Roosevelt today indorsed the wet plank adypted last liight by the Democratic convention.  In a telegram to James A. Farley, the Roosevelt campaign manager, the New York governor said the country and the party ought to be congratulated oil the platform.  The telegram read :  "The country and the parly ought to be congratulated on the shortest, clearest and me.-t readable platform in our whole history. I ani gl-ad the will of the party was ,-hown on j the majority prohibition plank by i such a definite majority. I ani for it. It is substantially the same plank I ran on in this state two years ago."  lot. A check-up, however, showed no indication of a collapse in the lines of ¡he Roosevelt opponents.  'Ihe managers of Speaker Garner, James A. Reed and Governor White insisted their candidates would get the full backing of their states on the early ballots.  The Roosevelt opposition took encouragement iu the opening of headquarters for Newton 1). Baker of Ohio, first of the dark horse candidates to get in the picture. The office was operated by friends of Baker without his formal sanction. - Alfred E. Smith went into his headquarters shortly after noon to make a late check on the presidential situation.  There were still no signs of a coalition among the Roosevelt, opposition, but Governor Ritchie of Maryland was pointed to as very likely the first choice for a concentrated attack by the opposition if Governor Roosevelt is stopped.  Word spread that it would take very little to cause Tammany to go into the Roosevelt ranks.  The organization would • like to throw its votes here and there for several ballots, however, to size up the situation but its leaders are by no means certain there will lie several ballots. Plans today were for each delegates to throw his vote where he wisb'es on the first ballot.  Leaders believe that about 33 will go to Roosevelt and most of the other oil t° Smith.  J favoring the governor of New Y'ork was equivalent to an instructed delegation and declared he would not have the face to go before the people of Mississippi and say he did not carry out their wishes.  Mr. Giiic? said the delegation was opposed to being dictated to by "a congressional oligarchy" the same as Harding "wis rammed down the throats of the people-"'  Others spoke for and against Roosevelt but the caucus was held in executive session with newspapermen and all others except delegates excluded.  OFFERS ROOSEVELT'S  NAME AT CONVENTION  Chicago. .Tune 20.—OP)—Nominating Franklin D. Roosevelt for th-' presidency today, his old friend. John E. Mack, told the Democratic convention the,New Yorker filled the "crying need for a practical American with a clear prospective and  a  knowledge of j representatives later  VICTIM OF AMNESIA  Grc-nville. June 30.—OP)—A victim of amncMa. who has been identi-fi'd as .lames Thornton Heffner of Houston. Tex., is under treatment in King'- Dauglrer.s Hospital here while his wife, .Mr-. Lena Heffner, 307 Medina sire-i. Houston, is on her way to his bedside.  The ymin^ man, apparently under 30. was ¡licked up by police iu a dazed endiuon. Papers found on him tended to show he « as of sea-going vc—'is and ~ ¡mien  MISSISSIPPI VOTES"  AGAINST REPEAL  i ¡ireiuan ■ v. rumene j  i tied him  (Continued on page eight)  as Heffner.  I  Complete Democratic Platform  Chicago, June 29. (/Pi—The com-| agricultural and commercial le.ader-plete text of the Democratic platform i -^''l' >"  th '' world lies in a drastic  approved by the full resolutions eom-  change in i-oni >mie and governmental  policies.  mittee and adopted by the - onvention J p„.]¡,. vj , i: ,  t h.-.t a party platform is today follows: j a covenant with ;he people to be  In this time of unprecedented eco- j faithfully k-pt by the party wheu en-nomic and social distress the Demo-j trusted with power, and that the peo-cratic party declares its convictions ;  ;m ' cntitb-.l to know in plain that the chief causes of this condition !  K " r,i<  terms of the contract to  were the disastrous policio« purMied j «hi.-h they are a~k<-d to subscribe, we by our government >ince the World j  1 » ,,1 ' , ' ll .v <¡"ol.¡re this to be the platform War of economic isolation; fostering the merger of 'competitive busine.-^es  into monopolies ; and encouraging the indefensible ej-paiiMon and contraction of credit for private profit at the expense of the public.  Those who were responsible for these policies have abandoned the ideals on which the war was won, and thrown away the fruits of victory, thus rejecting the greatest, opportun-i ity in history to bring peace, prosperity and happiness to our people and to the world.  FOREIGN TRADE RL INED  They ha've ruined our foreign trade.  hereby il-  of the Dem oratio party.  TO ABIDE BY PLATFORM  The Democratic parry solemnly promisis by appropriate action to put into effect the principles, policies and reforms herein advocated.  ;l nd to eradicate the policies, methods and practices herein condemned,— We advocate :  1. An immediate and drastic reduction of governmental expenditures by  abolishing useless commissions and offices, consolidating departments and bureaus, and eliminating extravagance. tn .u-coinpli-h a saving of not le-s than 23 per cent iu the co:-'t of destroyed the values of our coinnicdi- i federal governnieiil ; and we call upon  Chicago. June 30. (.-P.)—Mississippi stood firmly in the anti-prohibition repeal and modification ranks last night on the convention floor in accordance with the majority vote in caucus that guided the unit rule.  The delegates from Mississippi were in lonesome company as only Oklahoma and Georgia voted solidly against the prohibition plank adopted by the convention. When Governor Sennett Conner announced the Mississippi vote, he was greeted by loud boos from (he galleries and from some delegates.  "Apparently they didn't like your vote." the'governor was told.  "No but they will like our vote this fall." he replied.  The Mississippi delegates likewise kept their banner out of the wet parade on the convention floor along with a few. other states. They avoided the trick of having their banner snatched by passing wets by moving it from  1  the aisle into the middle of the delegation.  Congressman John Rankin ad- ^ dressed the convention on the plank , of Governor W. H. (Alfalfa Bill) Murray providing for the payment of the soldiers' bonus in cash. He told the convention it would bring reliec " to'a million men and remove the "present money panic" by distributing the funds through all jurts of the country. He painted a sad picture of the' plight of the veteran- hikers now assembled in Washington and urged the delegates to vote for the plank so that these men can get the ' money and feed rheir hungry families.-i?  Senator Pat Harrison supported the minority plank for resubmission without recommendation in the credentials committee, of which he was a meni-ber. His delegation .sustained him by voting its 20 votes for the minority report.  j Ii was learned today Senator Har-| rison voted" against the seating of Huey Long delegates from Louisiana yesterday in .a roll call of the delegates but hi» vote was washed out by the unit rule requiring the full state vote to be.cast in accordance with the majority vote of the delegates.  Senator Long told Senator Harrison that he appreciated the Mississippi vote and Senator Harrison told hiin that lie did not vote for him.  "Well, you are at least frank," replied Long.  Senator Harrison favored the seating' of the J. Y. Sanders delegate» because he said they were elected regularly.  The Mississippi delegates -will decide today whether they will follow Harrison for Roosevelt or Conner for Baker.  ties and products, crippled our banking system, robbed millions of our people of their life savings and thrown millions more out of work, produced widespread poverty and brought the government to a state of financial distress unprecedented in times of peace.  The only hope for improving present conditions, restoring employment, affording permanent relief to the people, and bringing the nation back to its former proud position of domestic happiness and of financial, industrial,  the Democratic party in the states to make a zeub.us effort to achieve a proportionate result.  2. Maintenance of the national credit by a federal budget annually balanced on the basis of accurate executive estimates within revenues, raised by a system of taxation levied on (he principle of ability to pay.  3. A sound currency to be preserved at all hazards; and an international monetary conference called on the in-  (coatinued on page fire).  NEW STATE INSLRANCE  COM MI SSI ON ASSEMBLIES  Jack-on. Miss.. .Tune 30. UP)—The new state insurance commission began to formally function today following a reorganization meeting yesterday at which M. S. Pickett, Hattiesburg, was named chairman.  Guy M. Iluughrou. New " Albany, wa.s elected secretary. The third member of the commission is H. II. Bos-well. Coffeeville.  Records-" and minutes of (he o?i{ commission were transferred to the new body at yesterday's aieetinj.   

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