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Biloxi Daily Herald Newspaper Archive: June 28, 1832 - Page 1

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   Biloxi Daily Herald (Newspaper) - June 28, 1832, Biloxi, Mississippi                                 8 pages  If yon do not rereive yom Henld  phone before 6:30 p. m. 37—Biloii 90-Gal£poit  The  Daily He rald  BELIEVERS IN PROPOSED  New Bank for Gulfport WiU Raï» To lt9 Support Wfdnfsdajr Afternoon.  ASSOCIATED PRESS LEASED WIRE—NEA SERVICE  HERALD BUILDING, BILOXI  MISSISSIPPI COAST, TUESDAY AFTERXODN, JUXE^, 1932  HERALD BUILDING, GULFPORT  15c A WEEK—VOLU>CE XXXIV—NUMBER 271  TWO-THIRDS RULE MAINTAINED, COMPROMISE IS CAST ASIDE  Platform Adoption Before Nomination Also Favored By Committee On Rules  Lindbergh RevesJs Gurtis Accused Servants of Part In Theft of Flier's Baby  lowan Named  To R. F. C. Post  Faith Expressed In Household Group As Colonel Testifies  Klenun?tnn. N. J.. June 2S.—(.iP)— r^'l. Cliaries A. Lindbersh t^stif'r.d today thiit th«» actiTitipfi of John Hnghes Curtis ba<i itnppiiod both his own and poMi^p efforts to trace th" kidnap-murd'^rfs of the Lindbergh hnhy.  fV.I. Lindiifr^'Ii r .nipk-i>Mj his direct fpstimony at tlio niorjiii)X SP-S.-ion of ('urtis' trial f<ir hindering capture of tbf> criminals.  T'ndpf rrop'* Piamination (bis af-tTiioon be said that Curtis' stni-y I* having «»pn ?oniP I'f t!ip ransom bills paid by Dr. .lolui F. Condon in the Iianiis of the allp^pd kidnappr.s ]ip wfl? dealing.vitb caiispd Lindb<-rsh jiractifally to spver communications uilh Dr. Condon.  Ho said Dr. Condon represent pd "i))p mo~i important thing vre have 11'  REDUCTION IN HEALTH BOÂRD  Salary Cuts. Reiroaotive <o January 1. .Announced Along With Release of Part of Personnel.  I.WOLVED SERVANTS  Fjeinins:ton, X. .7.. -liiiip —(JP}~ Colon«! CuariPK A. Lindbprgh tpsti-fied loiiny that John Hughes Curtis tolJl him he had inforniation that the kfdnapinf of the Lindbergh baby was (irranged b.7 a member of the Lindbergh hoi3?ehold and that he thought the person was a girl.  For the semnd day. Col- Lindbergh took the stand in the trial of Curtis for hinritiring captur« o£ the baby's kiduaperK and .slayers.  He told of a long series of journeys with Curtis in efforts to make con-ta-t with the kidnapers, all of which were futile.  And then he tvsiified Curtis told iiim the kidnapers had di.sclw?ed to him that a member rif the flier's own household -rss implicated.  Among: spectstor» iu the court room who heard this testimony were two wouien nveinbers of the Lindbersh domestic staff. Betty Gow. the baby's nurse, and Mrs. Ullie Wheatley, the bousekeeppr. Both were at the Lindbergh home iu Hopewell when the baby was stoien. Both were questioned at the lime by poli.-e and both -.vie cxoner.iiod o[ any implication.  CIKTIS' STORY Ciirti-' story iif the kidnapins:, as he t'dd Lindbprgh he learned it from the kidnapprs thenisplves, was as follows nccoriling to Lindbergh's testimony today:  The kidnaping was staged by two men, Joh nand another known as Kric or Nils, who came from Newark. After conferring with the unnamed member of the Lindbergh household they chloroformed the baby, taking him (Continued on page six)  STATE NEEDS OFFICE SPACE  A'arioiis Departments Crowded in Spite of Fact That Ulississippi Has Two Capitol Buildings.  Jackson. Mi^s.. June Mis  sissippi. more fortunate than most oilier .«t.ites in having two capitol buildings available for housing of the variou.s state departments and agencies. is confrontpd with a space shortage.  The new capitol rommi.^siijn. which rpplaced the old commission by act of the recent legislature, is h.iving its trouble.«, .and jilcnty of ihem.  The difficulty datp.s back to anothpr act of the legislature which groatly extended ¡he activitips of the .state tax commis.«ion by levying additional assessments, administration of which is charged to th'^ tax department.  Soon nftor Alf H. S;one took over (Continued on page two)  Jackr^^n, .Tune 2S—(JP)—The pnin-iiig knife cut depply into another .state dppartniptit today as the state board of health announced sweeping salary reducfions in evpry division, retrench-nient tbrn\igh rplcase of i>er.«onnel and discontinuance of numerous services forced by a budget reduction exceeding CO per cent.  Dr. Felix J. Underwood, exectitive ofi'ii er. announcing the board's action, said it was confirmed late yesterday by the board in SPS^'ion at Sanaioriiini. Salary- rpductions are retroactive as of January 1, he said.  'I'lie new annual budget represpnts a loss of .'i227.(«K) over tliat of I'JHl jipgged at .'<572,(HK), Dr. Fndorwood said- He explained the appropriations of the legislature reiiresented but •'J^.l per cent of the doji.irtnicnt's sup-l)ort in ]9-'!l and to the last legisla-lure'.s cut of 3."' and one-third per cent in siip])ort had to be added Iops of Rockefeller fouiidatinn support, Ro.s-enwald funds, I'. S. public health funds and redtictions in county .support ranging' up to thirty-three and one-third per cent.  "The .salary cut iu the central department in Jackson, i^GG.OOO annually, represents a slash of o8 per cent," Dr. Underwood said. '"This is.s carried on thro)igh the 29-full-time counties on about the same ratio. Di;?contin-uance of biological .services and release of ntimeroii.s workers here and in the field will make up the balance of the cut."  Dr. Henry Boswell, superintendent of .Sanitorium, .snbmitted and had approved a salary schedule for that in-•stitution carrying an annual reduction of approximately .$.j.j,000, Dr. Underwood .said.  The board, meeting again here today, announced re-election of Dr. J. W. Dugger as head of the bureau of industrial h.vgiene and factory inspection ior a fonr-ypar tenn. Appointment of Dr. H. C. Ricks as director of the bureau of county health work and Dr. Y. M. Creekmore as Kemper county health officpr also was confirmed. Twenty-sis applicants for medical licenses were given esamina-iions by the board today on the first two years of medical work.  "The reductions will necessarily impair the service heretofore given by the health department. We are proceeding as carefully as we may," he said, adding that "full reorganization had not been completed."  A number of clerical workers, inspectors and nursps already have been released, he said, with ])ossibility that more will have to be dismissed.  The Senaie today confirmed Gardner (.'owles, Sr., publi'-'her of the Dps ^Moines (la.) Register and a Republican. as a nipmbpr of the board of directors of the Recimstruction Finance? <Virporalioii. The aijpointraent merely fills the vacancy created on the board by the resignation of ("has. G. Dawes. The board's presidency, formerly held by Dawes, will be decided later. Cowles, 71, was named a member of the commission on conservation of the ])ublic domain in 192!).  WALSH STATE CHOICE FOR CHAIMANSHIP  Mississippians Line Up With Roosevelt Nominee After Fight; Conner Keeps Out of Wet Parade.  PROGRESS MADE ON VETS HOME  Piling Being Driven for Building Two at Soldiers Home—AYork On All Units Well Under \\"ay.  I.e. WILL NOT REBUILD PIER  Officials Say East Pier i» Suffirient tj> Carrj- on Prient Business Through Gulfport.  Hunter Was to Fly Pilottown Mail Line  Press dispatches from Rosedale. Jliss., erroneously stated yesterday that John Hunter, noted flier killed there, was on his way to New Orleans where he would open an air mail route to Gulfport. The air mail line referred to was the New Orleans-Piloiiown route.  Inquiry in Gulfport, both at the postoffice and the air port, revealed that no air mail system to New Orleans was contemplated so far as was known locally.  CALL FRENCH AND GERMANS  Rantsef .^faoDonald Seeks to Settle Differences Betwe^ Two Countries at Reparations Conference.  T. J. Quisley. general snperinteu-d'-nt of the Illinois Central sy.stem, and M. L- Cos!ley. assistant traf'ic ni.uiager of the system, who were iu Gulfport yesterday conferring with the Gulfport city commissioners, the Gijii[iort ¡>ort commission and others interc-^t'd iu a lease for land on the pier for construction of a si.irage warehouse, were seen by a Herald reiiresentative and were asked as to whether or not the west pier, destroyed by fire several weeks ago, would be rebuiit. Both officials said that the pier would nor be rebuilt tuitil there was a demand for if. At the present time, they said, all business d'>ne by the railroad at Guif-can be done over the east pier, xvh ch i^ over a mile iu length.  asketi by the  Lausanne, Switzerland. .Tune 2,'.— (■■P)—Prime ^linister Ramsay Mae-Donald called in the French .md Germans! today and told them that if the reparations conference i.s to get anywhere they will have to bury the hatchet. V  He was making a determined effort to prevent the conference from breaking up without accomplishing anything. Thnt ditn;ret wa< tiiro^ron-ed yesterday when Chancellor Yon Papen of Germany told Premier Her-riot of France that his country insisted upon cancellation of reparanons.  That brought the two right hack where they started. f'T the French premi-r cannot retreat from the «and that France will not perm't c.nncella-fion until she is assured of adequate compensation for the money she would lo.^e if the German payments stop-ed.  Today's met^ting brought the two premiers and their finance ministers to Mr. MacDonald's headquarters. A successful compromise seemed to depend upon the discovery of a formula which would satisfy bo;h French and German opinion at home.  I.on; conferences last nicht failed (o better the situation whi'ii h.is ;:roivn out of Germany's flat demand  After considerable delay owing to change in the pile driviiig schedule, because of unforseen difficulties, necessitating the driving of piling to a greater depth than originally planned, the work on the new million dollar soldiers' home at Biioxi is proceeding on schedule and various con(racfO'>" are pushing work ahead. About 340 men arc employed on the contract, the majority being local labor.  The government has decided to put down composite piling on building number two, the convalescent building, which will be three stories of brick with stone trim. It is 2.'$ feet long by 90 deep. The ground floor con.'-'ists of officers'' quarters, libra rv, two solariiims and 31 wards. The first and second floors each have two solariums and 36 wartls.  After making numerous tests it was decided to put down the piling as on building number one. thus providing a firmer foundation. 3f:'.ior R. J. Beall, superiniending construction for (he government said. Forty-five foot wood piling are sunk and then 20 to 22 feet concrete piling, taking it to two feet below water level. About 400 piling will have- to be driven for building number two.  Progress on the main building is well under way. Oncrete is being poured for the ground floor slab. This building will be five stories, contain 207 beds and be 2S0 feet long by 22r, deep.  On building number 9. the storehouse. the masonry work is about completed. ,<ind on building 33. Ihe control house, the walls are being poured. On b\iilding 32. the gatehouse, work is proceeding on the masonry work.  Other marked progress includes that on the nurses' home, which will he two sjorios nnd provide quarters for about "0 nurses. The roof is lieing c.uistr\icied and the brick work is up one story. TTork has started on (he parage, and last Thursday work on the warehouse was started.  With .ill the actual construction in progress, work on clearing and grading for the roads is being rushed and considerable progress is seen in p\ifting good roads through what had only small paths nnd a few narrow, winding roads. Every effort is being made to preserve the natural beauty and trees are being removed only wliei-e absoliiiel.T ¡lecpssary.  C. W. .Tone.s, the new superintendent for the National Construction (^o.. which has the main contract, has been on the .iob several days and is becoming acquainted with the contract. He is an able young engineer; m-fginally is from Atlanta, he comes to Biioxi from Fort 3Iommouth. N. J., where his concern had a i<o00.000 contract for officers' q\iarfers.  The quarters for the medical officer. duplex quarters, are well umler way. and the 300.('>00-sallon water rank has just been finished.  By RALPH WHEATLEY  (As.sociated Press Staff Writer)  Chicago. June 28—(.5^)—Mississippi's delegates to the national dem-O'Tatic convention late last night sidestepped a definite pledge of their 20 votPf^i to Franklin Roosevelt when a motion to adjourn the state caucus carried while the motion to pledge was pending.  James McClure of Sardis moved the adjournment on (he heels of a talk by Sam Anderson of Greenville pleading with the delegation to defer any action toward pledging the state's votes to anyone.  The Missi.ssippians, showing sharp division, voted 13 to 51-2 to support Senator Wah-'ii, of Montana as the convention's i)ermanent chairman in oi)position to Jouett Shotise.  Lee Guice of Biioxi led the fight against endorsement of Walsh in the caucus with the declaration that "a vote for Walsh is a vote for Roosevelt."  Senator Pat Harrison. Congress-njan John Rankin and I'hil .*itone of Oxford led the fight for AYalsh, asserting the sentiment in the Mississippi delegation was for Roosevelt and that the state should support the Roosevelt choice for permanent chairman.  In answer to a question by Guice relative to the recommendation of the stib-committee of the national committee for the election of Shouse, Senator Harrison said :  "I believe two mistakes have been made b}' Shouse in permitting (he presentation of hi» name, and by the Roosevelt forces in favoring any man for the place."  "I put the interests of the Democratic party before the personal ambitions of any man," asserted Charlie Snow of Jackson in declaring he -would vote against pledging the delegation to Walsh.  In answer to a proposal that Governor Sennett Conner be given !5Iissis-sippi's firK't vote for presidential nominations, Governor Conner, head of the delegation said:  "The chairman is not a candidate for president. I have a bigger and better job as governor of Jiississippi."  Governor Conner's strong right arm yesterday held the Mississippi banner firmly in place at his seat when other states paraded in a demonstration for resubmission of the 18th amendment. Jlississippi was one of the few .states which did not join the parade.  SEEK CHAIRMANSHIP  LONG'S GROUP GIVEN SEATS  Lonisians Senator*» DrfíS^twi Plfdjed to Roosevelt Recognized at Democratic Convention.  . T H O M A J A U S H  -JOUETT SHOUSE  Foreshadowing the fight between Franklin D. Roosevelt and the field for presidential nomination, is tli" contest between Senator Thomas J-Vralsh of Montana and Jouett Shouse for the post of permanent chair-m.Tii of the convention. Roosevelt forces are backing Walsh with opponents lined up behind Shouse.  Chicago Stadium. .Tune 28. (.¿P) —Senator Huey Long's Roosevelt-backed Louisiana delegation was voted admi.ssion to the Democratic national convention today. Mississippi's 20 votes were cast to seat Long's group.  The vote was 6.'iSi to ."141.  The Roo.sevelt <lelegation from Minnesota was also se.ntcd.  20-Minute Limit On Speeches Urged In Report of Group  Friends of Shouse Admit Walsh Likely WiD Win In Contest Over Chairmanship  Chicago Stadiuin, June 2S. (JP)— Some close friends of Jouett Shouse today conceded that he would be defeated for the permannt chairmanship of the Democratic convention by Senator AYalsh, of Montana, the Roosevelt choice.  100 ENROLLED AT , CAMPGROUNDS  I -  iBi.shop Hoyt Dobbs Will Deliver Sev eral J.rf!ctiires This Week at Pastor's School.  Chicago, June 28. (/P)—The first real test of .strength on the convention floor today found state delegations still deciding or trying to decide whether to vote for Senator Walsh or Jonett Shouse for permanent chairman.  Like those before, expressions from st^te delegations today on the issue only added to the uncertainty, although supporters of the ^Montana senator were j\ihilant as Kentucky decided to give the majority if not .all, their votes for him. Alabama's famous 24 will go for the senator and Utah further lightened the hearts of the Roosevelt men by peldging its eight votes to the veteran Democrat from the West. ^Michigan too will throw it,s 58 votes the way Roosevelt wants (hem to go. although this was foreshadowed ye^terday.  By contrast, there was some comfort, for Shouse and anti-Rbosevelt men. one and the same generally, in the tentative decision of Kansas, a  Roosevelt state, to give nine of its' votes for the executive director of the Democratic national committee. It, however, will give 11 to Walsh.  Governor Woodring, chairman of the delegation immediately said that he would invoke the unit rule, if necessary, to throw all the group's 20 votes to Walsh.  Further rebuttal of Shouse's claims came as Colorado with 12 votes to give, decided in caucus that Walsh should get them.  There was divjsion, however, in the New Mexico group. Half, nnder the caucus decision, will go to each contender. and Connecticut, decided to give Shouse 9i votes.  The last minute caucuses left both sides confident and Shouse himself, said as he went toward the convention floor:  "I am still confident I vdll win."  He predicted that many of the states instructed or pledged for Roosevelt would split and he would be the beneficiary.  Theoretically, little was involved in the issue but act\ially both sides M-ere staking much on it.  There are many delegates here walking a tight rope of indecision and they m.ay fall promptly into the group which wins today's victory.  Chicago. June 28.—i/i')—The fight on Louisiana's kingfish—Huey P. Long—sped today straight to the floor of the Democratic convention :is Long's delegation and the "regulars" from Minnesota won before the credentials committee.  With their ire up over losses before the Democratic national committee on Friday and the credentials eommiitee early today. Ex-Governor J. y. Sanders, of I^ouisiana, and John E. Regan, of Minnesota, heads of the losing delegations, prepared appeals to the 1,1'54 delegates to the convention.  In the case of iMinnesota, it was an outright contest between Franklin Roosevelt and Alfred E. Smith, as the Einar Hoidale delegates, who were recommended for seating, are pledged to Roosevelt, and the contestants are for Smith. But in the case of Lou-(Continued on page eight)  TAX RUUNGS MADE PUBLIC  Attorney for State Commission De cidfts Questions Relative to Apppli ration of Sales Tax.  Chicago St.idinm, June 2S JJF^ The rules of the last Democratic ooa-vention requiring a two-thirds a*-jority for nomination of a presidential candidate were acTopted by the rules committee today after the c^ompromise was cast aside. ,  Completely reversing the position it took yesterday, the committee Jilso decided to recommend the convention adopt its platform before nominating candidates for president and vice president.  The committee opened the way for adoption by the next convention of a plan for abolition of the century-old two-thirds rule. It recommended the 19o6 convention abrogate the rule, but specifically stipulated that ic would not be bound by the recommendation. ,  A recommencLition that the speeches placing candidates in nomination be limiteii to 2iJ minutes and that .seconding speeches be no longer than five minutes was also approved. The committee also advised the convention to limit the time allotted to any delegate to 30 minutes.  fi  Relative to the lea . ....... . - .  from the Illinois reparations be cancelled and  ciiy <o' (Jiilfpori Cenirn; s\s!cui for space on which to elect a storage warehouse on the east pier au agreement was reache<l on nil points involved except as to liability in case of fire or accident causing loss.  n is thought, however, that an  France's insistence that s'>me iiay-ments must be made.  The British and Italian delegations were sticking to their guns, however, detenninfd that the conference must not end in failure and that some solution must be achieved.  After three hours' c nsultation last  a:;reement on this p.dnt can be .....  rccheu in a short time an.h that the : night the trench and Germans sus-city will able to construct such | pended their conversations until Wed-  & builUiys ia the near iutur», __ii.eadaj.  WET FORCES ADD STRENGTH  .Movement For Repeal Gains Snpport pf Estimated Total of Twenty Slates, 566 Votes. ^  By FRANCIS M. STEPHENSON'  Chicaco. June —A wet re  volt of !>rop"rli'ins surpri>iug even its organizers was movin; on the I'emo-cratic convention today demanding repeal of the eighteenth amendment nnd immeiliate modification of the Yol-stead act.  This platform plank was proposed by Alfred E. Smith and the drive was launched by Senator Walsh, of Massachusetts, after a conference of the wet forces ."^eniTv^r Walsh con-cedtd to his own astonishment in an-  (CogtiAged OA jRage euiitj!.  About 100 are enrolled at the 11-day pastors' school at the Seashore Methodist Assembly. Laymen and pastors are in attendance with number of ladies enrolled^ Abou« 75 percent of those enrolled are pastors and the rest laymen. Classes were conductcd today oa regular ischedule following the opening of the registration lait night. Rev. S M. Baker, is dean of the school, and Rev. John Chambers, educational director.  The instructors are men carefully chosen being particularly fitted to offer their respective coiir.ses. The faculty is composed of.  Dr. E. F. Cook. Macon, Ga., Dr. W. M. Curtis, Mobile; Dr. .L L. De-cell. Jackson: Dr. 0. E. Goddard, foreign spcretar,v. board of missions; Rev. R. G. Lord, executive .secretary Xo. Mis-is=ippi Conference; Dr. A. S. Lutz. Minden. Ln.: Iter. A. K. McLean. promotional secretary. La. conference : Dr. Claud Drear, executive secretary, North Ala. conference; Dr. W, G. (jnillian, General secretary general board of Christian Education; Dr. J. A. Smith. Jackson; Rev. D. L. Simpson, editorial dept.. gen. board Christian Ediieation; Dr. W. W. Woollard. Ripley, Miss.  Bishop Hoyt M. Dobbs. Shreveport. preached last night on "The Cross and stressed the fact and the significance of the Cross and the Relationships that result from these two.  Bishops Dobbs, will lecture again tonight and also speak Wedne.sday and Thursdtiy night at 7:30 o'clock in conjunction with the Pastor's School, which opened last night. The Kchedule for the rest of the addresses is as follows; Dr. O. E. Goddard, Friday; Saturdav there will be an open fornm. Sunda,v morning Dr. W, F. Qiiillian will speak and Dr. Goddard will speak at niiht ; on .Maid,iy, July 4, Dr. Ed F. Sook .speak.s; Tuesday. .Tiily .1. Dr. O. E. Goddard ; Wednesday. July f«. Dr. Ed F. Cook and Thursday. July 7, Dr. W. F. Quillian will speak.  TWE.NTV-ONF .\CCl SEf)  •VS SUNDAY WORKERS  ileridian. Miss.. June 2S.—Charges of violating the Sunday nonworking law were filed against 21 men engaged in excavating for the new post-office here. The mayor sent word to the foreman yesterday to stop the work, bat the latter said he was carrying orders of a superior. The arre.st f.-llowed. The mayor announced he will try the cases Wednesday. ' -  Wild Biir' of Sullivan's Hollow Dies at Age of 81  Mize. Miss., June 28.—(>P)—''Wild death claimed one after another of  Bill'' Sullivan, last "king of Sulli-1 kinsman. ,  In recent years. Bin s life has been  van'.s Hollow,"' is dead.  quiet and staid, though he always en-  "Wild Bill"—his mother called hiin reminiscenses of "the old days"  "leadproof"—who had laughed at death many times in his iron rule of the fetid-ridden, bloody, "hollow." surrender only under weight of 81 years and a chronic heart ailment.  He died at his home near here and after long fight for life.  Death of "Wild Bill" removed one of ^Mississippi's most colorful figures, whose career in his Simpson county "empire'' labeled him variously as outlaw, fugitive and good citizen.  A descendent of a clannish tribe of nine brothers, who, tradition says, originally settled the "hollow" in l,Sl()_"\Vild Bill" became the last exponent of their ferocity as viol-.mt  ...the battle of Shiloh church, the Bunker Hill mill fight and a score of "br.nshe.s'' with knife and gun involving members of his clan.  The Sullivans, best remembered as being "quick on the trigger and a law unto themselves,'' still rule th" hollow as progressive, hospitable cit-izelis. It has been estimated that P.'iO of the 4-'0 students in the hollow-school district today are Sullivans.  "Wild Bill'' is survived by his wife, a brother Henry of ;\iize. two sons, Boyd of Chic.igo and Julius of Mize; three daughters, ^[rs. H. S. Bryant. Mize; Joe Sullivan, :\fize, and  Mr.s. Tom Pickering, Mt. Olive.  BUSINESS HOUSES TO COMPLY WITH MAYOR'S PROCLAMATION  At a meeting of the Citizen's Bank Committee in the Chamber of Commerce yesterdays-committees were sent out, two members in each committee to cover the entke city of Gulfport and afc-k all merchants to close their soon as possible, stores Wednesda.T, June 29, from 12 noon for the balance of the day.  The committees reported back that they had met with practically a 100 per cent response.  All lines of business responded including print shops, news stands, shoe repair shops, department stores, shoe stores, barber shops, dry good.s and clothing store, jewelry, specialty and grocery stores. Drug stores, which usually do not close, agreed to close their stores from 12 to 1 o'clock.  Members of the committee have also contacted interested persons in Wiggins. Perkinston, Pass Christian Howison and other places as well as the back country and a good attendance is expected at the noon luncheon at Hotel Markham where preparations have been made to handle a crowd up to 500 if necessary. /  Everybody is invited to attend this luncheon which will be served at a nominal price per plate. It is given not onl,v for the people of Gulfport but also for^thoi-e in communities contiguous to Gulfport. said the chairman of the committee.  Those who are not able to attend the luncheon are asked to give at least one and one-half hours Wednesday afternoon to seeing persons who have not yet signed creditor's agreements and report to the committee at the old First National Bank building in Gulfport on work done.  Again die Citizens Bank Committee .ind the Stockholders Committee hav-  ias the org^aizatioa &£ Ul* bank  in charge, urge every depositor, no matter how small the deposit, to come at once to the old First National Bank building in Gulfport and sign a creditor.?' agreement so that the new bank may be placed in operation as  MERIDIAN HELD AS AN EXAMPLE  Reopeninc of Liquidatinjr Bank Brought .\bont Beneficial Results in City's Business Conditions.  Jackson, Mis?. ,June 2S—(.^)—Vr. E. Gore, attorney for the state tax comQiission, today ruled on a number of questions arising from administration of Mississippi's now two per cent general sales and gross income tax.  Among the more important rulings was one holding that agents of printing concerns in other states, who established an office in Mississippi and take orders for work to be done in another state, cannot be assessed under the .sales tn.T, but aré liable for a peddler's tax.  Other rulings made today were: Cotton held in compresses over a long period of time, is subject to the sales tax only for the period since ^lay 3. when the new tax became effective. the charges prior to that date not being subject to the levy.  Gross proceeds of sales or supplies and merchandise to tenants are subject to the sales tax.  (Continued on page two)  BR.\NDON EXPECTS LESS  THAN SIX BALLOTS  Chicago, Jtine 2S—i/P)—The voice that in 1924 led off each Democratic convention ballot with "Alabama casts 24 votps for Underwood" is just the same this year, but the ttine is changed to "24 votes for Roosevelt-''  The owner of the voice, former Governor W. W. Brandon of Alabama has the lead-off place on roll calls. Brandon predicts a nomination in less than six ballotr», and he has a reason: "I started out in New York in 1024, in a !?2.'5 a day suite, but before the convention endpd I was eating hot dogs. And, boys, I don't like hoc dogs."  CO.MPROMISE REACHED  Chicago. June 28.—Oi»)—Under the redoubled offensive of a ring of ene^ mies, the supporters of Franklin D. Roosevelt battled desperately to hold their lines today as the Democratic convention brought its multiplying troubles into the open.  The strng.gle, with the ultimate pri/.e the presidential nomination itself, was concerned for the moment with the two prior questions of choosing a convention chairman and writ-ins the convention rules, while a collateral engagement over credentials threatened and a floor fight on prohibition seemed assured.  A long succession of conferences and maneuTcring, lasting until the hours of morning, h.Td produced a fast-moving sequel to yesterday's rath-èr tedious opening convention session. Roosevelt-dominated committees not only had recommended a Roosevelt chairman, but had taken the extraordinary step of proposing that adoption of the platform be postponed until a nominee is chosen. Another Roosevelt-dominated committee -decided for modified two-thirds nominating rule, but the governor's headquarters insisted that neither the candidate nor his "friends'' had been responsible for their compromise. .  WALSH ENDORSED  From the committee on permanent organization came a reporr, ado^i—i 36 to 12 by the overwhelming support of the states pledged to the New Yorker for president, endorsing Senator Thomas J. Walsh of Montana for chairman in place of .Touetf Shouse, of Kansas, the candidate of the favorite sons.  Dividing 30 to 20 after a warm debate, the rules committee presented a rule under which the nomination could be made by a simple majority after any deadlock had run for six ballots, with no candidate able to muster the two-thirds required in every previous convention for a hundred years.  On both these questions the convention itself seemed likely to vot* close decisions. Not only had many Roosevelt delegate.? gone over to Shouse for chairman, but the governor's withdrawal late yesterday from (Continued on page two)  TCOAVS  GAM  Relative to opening of a bank that is in liquidation, the following letter has been received from the executive vice president of the First National Bank oí Meridi^ recently opened under circumstances similar to those at Gulfport:  June 27, 1932.  ^Ir. J. H .Beeman, Gulfport, Miss. Dear Sir:  In response to your inquiry asking for my opinion as to the wisdois of reopening a bank :hat is in liquidation ; the effect it would have on the community, values, etc., I wish to state that my experience and observation in matters of this khid has been such th..t there is only one side to the question.  When contemplating opening this bank, the Comptroller of the Currency in Washington stated to me that the average recovery in normal iCoaluiued on Pii;e  NATIONAL LEAGUE  First game : New York ...001 100 104—7 10 1  Brooklyn ____(X)l 000 020—3 10 2  " Fitz-simmon'. Gibson and Hogan; Heimacli, Quinn, Giungo and Suke-forth.  Homers • Frederick (.3rd i, Lind-strom (4th).  Second g.Tme:  New York ........2  Brooklyn ........1  Luque and O'Farrell ; Yance and Lopez.  Homer: Terry (IstL  Philadelphia ......000 20  Bostun ..........100 30  Collins. Berly ( ."ith) and V. Dayis ; Brown and Sjiohrer.  Sf. Louis.........(Kk> 2  Cincinnali .....OOO 0  Hallahau and Mancuso; Rixey and Lombardi.  A.MERICAN LEAGUE  Wjshin;;fon .......000 001 0  New York ........002 201 0  Thomas and Spencer; Allen and Dickey.  Homers: Sewell (3rd), Lazzeri (6th).  Boston ..........200 010  Philadelphia ......tMX>  AYeiland and Connolly; Krausse and Cochrane. Hemer ; Jolmson (SHi).  VOTE DOES NOT AFFECT STOCKS  Sfucïj- of Record« .Sine« 1Ä7.5 Shows Wall Street Not Influencefl By "Presidential Years."  By FRANK H. MtCONNELL (Associated Press Financial Writer)  New York. June 2S—i/'P;—"It's a presidential year.'"  This phrase invariably sends a tremor through the average investor or speculator—but there is little in the long record of American finance to justify it. A half century of market historj- shows two things with surprising conclusiveness:  1. The tidal force of world events— lean or bumper crops, inilow or outflow of gold, war or peace—moved prices where they would with the rivers of speeches by political campaigners and the candidates havinj limited effect.  2. Declines or rallies have followed the presidential elections in almost equal number and except for a few-instances appear to have had their motivating forces in other than relief, or alarm, growing out of the popular ball.jt.  A study of stock, market average-«, compiled by Warren M.</4'>rsons, economist, carri^ the record of price movementa back to 1875. In that period there have been fourteen presidential campaign,«, not including the present. The sensitive rtock mark^ has rallied during the height of eight of these and has declined during six of them.  With few exceptions, the pri.« changes have m.ic i?een sharp. Fol-(Coatisaed oa paja eisht)   

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