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Biloxi Daily Herald Newspaper Archive: June 27, 1832 - Page 1

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   Biloxi Daily Herald (Newspaper) - June 27, 1832, Biloxi, Mississippi                                 8 pasres  I£ yoa do not receive jour Herald pîe»«e phone before 6:30 p. m.  37—BUoxi  90—Galfport  The m Daily He rald  PEOPLE OF GlTLFPflteT ■  Will Be Giren An Opportunity W<»dnesday Afternoon t*» Work For New Bank.  ASSOCIATED PRESS LEASED WIRE—NEA SERVICE  HERALD BUILDING, BILOXI  MISSISSIPPI COAST, MONDAY AFTERNOON. JUNE 27, 1932  HERALD BUILDING. GULFPORT  15c A WEEK—VOLUME XXXIV—NUMBER 270  Keynoter Urges Prohibition Vote; Denounces Republicans  COURT FAILS TO DECIDE ON  RfDisracriNG  Decision On Legality of Act Expected Today Not Forthcoming as Judges Adjourn After Brief Session.  .Tâck^on, June 2T.—'/P)—The s;ate siiprem«» fourt sat in brief «'^«sion today init did not hand down a d-ci-sinn on the constiiutionalitj- of !Mis-ulssiiipi's n<;w consressional redistr^ct-ing .-icf. takeu iindor adviscmcnt last week fonowii)? ai-ïiimeiit on appeals from the lower court décidions.  Hish court, with only four the six justices pr-'Hont, Landed down rulings on two sngjestions of error and adjourned until nest Monday nmrn-iuj:. However, it is possible a deei- i KÎi>n in tlie case iniiy he f/rihcotnin: before ll):it linie. ctiurt aitncheM point-in? out lliat a sfssion nuiy l)e lirld duriiiR the w>'i-k if an en lianc deci-Kion is reached h'fore Monday.  The apjicals w-i-e argued before th<^ ln;,'h court last Tliuu.sday and voluminous briefs filed. Meniliers of the court .«aid every eff'Tt would be made to reacli an early decision in view of the stat'-wide interest and importance of the case.  The act. declared utK-ons;ituiioiial hy two lowiT courts which enjoined the serretary of from carrying  «ut his i.fficial duties in connection wiih the November congressional elections, provides for redistricting of the .itate so as to reduce th" number of Mississippi congressmen from eight to 5pven in line with the federal reapportionment act.  Tlie legislature aecomplish<^d th'^ reduction by combing the oid seventh and eiirhth districts. The consiitu-tionality of the measure was attacked by citizens of the old seventh district.  Anticipating a state at large race, candidates filed their names for the seven congressional .seats if the race is statewide. Should the act be upheld, (he race will be made from districts as set tip under the new act. , A final attempt to prevent the Êaugins of P.iul 'W'exler. Hattiesburg youth convicted of murdor. by court __8ction, lost today when the Mississippi iiupreme Court overruled five suggestions of error in its recent opinion.  Wesler was sentenced to hang .Tuly 14, in an opinion handed down by the high tribunal several weeks ago,. He was convictcd of the murder of J. L. Odom, Hattiesburg filling station operator and Andrew Prince, negro, who admitted firing the fatal shot, ]ikewi.se was sentenced to be executed on that date.  Attorneys for Wesler contended that the court erred iu saying that if tiie district attorney. Holmes, "was guilty of misconduct in argtiment of thn case, this did the app^llant (Wex-l'>r) no harm;" and tiiat the court erred in holding that Holmes' argument did appellant harm, "because it was an appeal to already highly prejudiced minds. ''In oiher words." the lawyers' brief said. "It is an admission of (he trtuh that the public mind was highly inflamed against the defendant."  Other errors suggested by (he law-yers. but overrttled, were that the cotirt erred in saying the jury could have rcac-hed no other verdict ; that it erred in ui)holding the iudictnient and that it erred in discttssing W'lX-l-'r's reftjsal to talk, because ":he appellant had liie right under the law fnd the decision of this court to remain .silent and rely upon his legal rights to have the case reversed."'  Acting Governor Dennis Jltirphree, chief executive in the absence of Gov. Sennett Conner, who in Chicago, today said there was no application b--f'ire him for a formal ¡tearing in the Wcxler case.  New Commander of Dixie Veterans  CURTIS LOSES HRST TILT AS TRIAUTARTS  Judge Refuses to Sustain Objections to Attorney— CoJ. Lindbergh Present In Courtroom.  CURTAIN RISES ON DEMOCRATS'  ALL-STAR SHOW AT CHICAGO  ilemiuston, N. J., June 27.—(JP)^ Selection of a jury for the trial of John Hughes Curtis, yi^ completed a: ji.tu. today nUci- ntimerotts  chalicuges by both defense and prose-cut i'oi.  Flcniington. X. .T., .Tune 27. (/P)— ,Tudge Adam (.'. Kobiiins refust^ today to di.>miss the' indictment against ,7ohn Hughes Curtis, ou trial as hoaxer of the Lindbergh baby case.  Cicneral Homer Atkinson iabovei of Pet'-rsliurg. \'a., was uu.iiiimously elected as V-onimander-in-ehief of the rnited Confederate Veterans at their reunion in Riibinond. Va. He suc-c'^ded General C- A. He Saussure of MempJiis, 'J'enii.  STATES VOTE ON RULE ISSUE  Various Delegations Deciding Positions Oil Question of Abolishing Two-Tliirds Requirement,  Chicago, June 27.—f/P}—State after state went into caucus today to fietermine how their votes would be cast on the move to .scrap the historic two-thirds rule btit so fine w.is the line separatine opposing forces iliat c<iiiveniioi! opeiiiug found the outcome siili in doubt.  There was the same situation-.an. whether to go along with Jioosevelt forces in tiio atit-mi>t io liave Senator Walsh of Montana made permanent chairman, although many states reserved decision on this.  Despite an appeal from Gov. Roosevelt to' the delegation that North Carolina sent instructed to support him for the presidency, tlias: state divided on the two-thirds rule, with the bulk of the delegate the lloosevel-tian stand for abrogation.  .Maine and New Ycrk. also divid'^d with a lieavy majority of their delegates opposed to abrogation. Michigan was closely divided bttL elected a member of (he rules connniitce who said he believed the rule should l>e chani;ed if five ballms did not bring a nominee by a two-thirds majority.  Lined up with the Rooserclt forces as James A. Farley, the manager, again voiced a determination to go through with the rules fight, were Montana, Florida, Arkansas, Idaho, Kansas. Nevada, (iregon. Arizona, Sotith Dakota, Georgia, Minnesota and West ^'¡rginia.  Aligned agaiii'^t them were Texas, Vif;;iiiia, Alaska. Now Jersey. Oklahoma, Iowa and ^Massachusetts.  Liquidation  Not as Beneficial As Functioning Bank  TliP Cit7.''n? Bank Commitf^e authorizes the following and further statement :  In couiioclioii with the 3702 administered receiverships in the P'>-riod 1SG5 to liKU. "the aggregate Ixtok vahie of the assets of the 17'J'J n<imini.stcred receiverships, iiicliicling a"-si>is acquired after suspenion wa«; i51.2.')().448.t>.';4, in addition to which j ]-,.t:ir  Murphree Sits In Governor's Chair  Jacks-on, JiiOp 27. i.-P}—A new face peered from behind tlie iHi'Lre d"sk in the governor's private chaniber todty —tiiat of J A. Gov. Dennis .Murpliree. ncting chief ,,xtt-iitive in absence fif Gov. Senneit Conner, who is in Cjii-cago as a ^Mississippi delegate to the Denio< ra(ic n'ltioti.'i! cou vent inn.  "Tins:is not mui-h of a treat to ine. ns I have he?u here be!<ire." reni;irked the acting giivernor as he seated hiin-"-■(■If ill the hii:.''' executive r-liair. He recnl!f><l that h'^ ii.Td serve<l uimoi or-I c:isiou (iiirini the adiiiiui.vtraiioii i.f (tovefiii'f \Mutfield, uiieii he aNo w;i< liei;ie],;:ni governor. 1I(> aKo ncted .ns chief exectiti\e aftin* (Governor ^\'lliIfield's (ie:tth.  ■■'rile d'Hirs of the goveritor's office are wide open and every man and woman ill the state who desires to see the actin.g go\eruor is cordialiy in-\i!ed fo coiiic." (lov. Mnrpiiri'c said. "I've a.-!;cd tlie govnior's priv..ue s.m to send ill e:u h vi-if't- in lii  Flemington, N. J., Jtine 27. (/P>— With Col. Charles A. Lindbergh watching from a nearby table, .lohu Hughcïi Cin-ris v.-eni on trial today I fop impelling justice in the search for j the kidnaiiers and murderers of the Lindliergh baby.  Tii(! prosecution won the first en-gagi ment when a motion by the defense for removal of one of the prosecution's jittorneys was denied by Judge Adam O. Kobbins.  As soon as court convened this morning the defense applied for the removal of Harry Stout, special assistant prosecutor, on the ground tliat when he was being wnsidered as a defense lawyer he learned secrets of the defense strategy. He was not eiuîdoy-ed and later was selected to help with the iirosecution.  Judge Robbiiis heard argument of the motion in his chambers, the argument lasting more than an hour and a half.  After secret argument on the Stout motion was completed the judge and attorneys returned to- the courtroom and tlie prospective jurors were taken from the room. The defense then began public argument on motions for dismissal of the indictment and for a bill of par-ticulars on (he charges against Cnrtis.  The motion for quashing the indictment was presented by "SV. C, Pender. Norfolk attorney on the defonse stafi. He argued that it deprived the defendant of his const ituti(uial rights, was vague as to detail, and placed Curtis ill double jeopardy.  Curtis, at th" defense table, gaxed fixedly at Col, Ch-.irlc.> A. Ijindbergh. seated "at the iirosecution table, wliile the argument was being made. Lindbergh kept his gtz.e on the table in front of him and iiis face was expressionless as several references were made to him and his murdered child.  Court adjourned at 32:15 p.m. E.'tstern Standard Time for one hour. Ac That time the defense had presented its argument for dismissal of the indictment but the prosecution had not yet been heard from.  During the presentation of the defense argument for dismissal Rynian Herr of defense counsel called upon the judge to assure Curtis a fair trial. He said he did not want to see Curtis "railroaded by the court as he was railroaded by the state police.''  Opening of Convention Is Peaceful Despite Threats Of Underlying Controversy  Tariff Rates, Farm Policy Condemned By Senator Barkley  14 FATALITIES IN SOUTHLAND  t  Eiglit Persons Drown as TlnMisauds Flock (o Beaches and Pools— Other .Accidents Claim Six.  PLANE KILLS NOTED FLIER  John Hunter. One of Brotliei-s Wlio Staged Endurance Flighf, I.fl.se.s Life at Kosedale.  Kosedale. :Miss., June 27.—(>P5— John Hunter, one of four brothers wlio achieved fame at Chicago two years ago by setting a world's airplane endurance flight record, was killed here today when the propeller of his ship .struck him in the head.  He and two of his brothers, AValter and Kenneth, were en route to New Orleans v.'iih three amphibian planes, with which .John and Kenneth ititend-ed to open an air-niail rottte between New Orleans and Gulfport, Miss.  The planes were forced down here late y'>ierday by a heavy rainstorm. After tbey had been wiinned up this nioriiing. .lohu clitnl'ed onto the wing of his siiip to uiìi'ic it from the dock. The whirling jiroiiellor struck him di-n>etly on the head.  Arthur Johnson, of New Orleans, who a<'comrianicd the three Hunter iirothers from Dctr<'it, where the idanes were delivered ;o them, flew on to New Orleans to fulfill the mail i mnrract.  oro'cr jii wiiii-li titer aiTÌt,> reu'ardlevs cf who i; i^ that i'imes. I may le ¡■•' ;ì!'!p III mee! y.nir wi^iies ami lio the il'l'.ii;» >.111 (i>v¡re i:'>ihí. ion a cor- i i''! «i;,..¡i!" All'! c"i;ne.iìis lie.üillg be priven to cveiy per>c.ii wiio ap-tile acting "cvenior.  th'Te have b'^'ct! levied a;;aiii»t >a.7re-hiildcrs assessments nL'^-regat tii SK',2, 2'^-'i.74it. Total ccl'ect i'Uis fri'm tti"-;', .T reported by the receivers to September ."0, l!'.'!!. iiicluuiiig off- i' se;« allowed and collections from' w .stock a'-se'i<monts. amounted to ."iH.7" ' p' percent, of the toi.nl ..f such ns<-ets i and stock assessments."  In connection with receivershiiis terminated in the period ISC.'^ 'o 3931, it is noted that "from the dat.' of tiip first failure of a National hank in IStl,') to the clo^e of busine-^s October o1. l()7.'-{ receiverships  h.ive been liijuidated and tni-rsiyard at (¡ulfi'.irt atiti exports lar: (dosed, or the affairs ihcrcd' restored  Atlanta. Ga.. .lune 27.—(TP)—Eight jiersons were drowned in the south as thousands flocked to the beaches, pools and river or went on outings to seek relief from a sweltering week end. Other accidents raised the total deaths from mishaps to fourteen.  Three were killed by automoliiles. one was accidentally shot, another was electrocuted and one killed by lightning.  ^lississippi and Alabama eaclr re-!>orted three fatalities fnan accidents. Georgia, 'and South Carolina two each, and Tennessee, Louisiana, Kentucky and Virginia one each.  Mr. and Mrs. Lee I{ehse. Jr.. of Gcrmantown,. Tenn., were drowned on a boating expedition at Lakeview, Miss., and ^V. iris grilling 3S, was electrocuted while fixingr lights for a party at his father'.s iicme at Duck Hill, ili^s.  George F. ^Marshall of ;\farion. Ala., w;3S waslied over a dam and drowned while on a swimming party in the (^"ahaha river near Birmingham. Ala. A seven-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Noah Freeman was killed by an automobile near i'ort Payne, Ala., and Clovis ;McI)aniel of Opelika was drowned in a lake near that Alabama city.  At Charleston. S. C.. David :^ross drowned while in swimming in the ocean and Ciiarles .Sweat drown>'d iri a creek. The I'.ev. Poland D. Williams of Nashville .nnd Atlanta was killed when bis auioinobile overturned at SHmmi'rviile. (¡a. liobfrt M. IJich-ard-oii. retii-'^d f.nruier. was killed liy  an automobile on a highway near  Macii, ('a.  Edward .f. Coop.er of Norfolk was drowneil a« his automobile went i>ff a pier in Virginia. Eli Martin of T,a-fayette. T.a., was killed by lightning j while at work in a field. Killy j Holladay. 32, was swejit into a storm | spwer and drowned at ^Memphis while : wading with playmate's, in a gutter ! nfter a ln'avy rain, firanville ^V;iIk- ^  TODAY'S  GAME  AMERICAN LEAGI E  iFirst game) :  Boston .....(140 000 202— S 12 2  Piiiladelphia :;6() 013 02.x—1.1 10 1 Andrews, ^loore, Lisenbec and Tate; Earnshaw and Cochrane, Heviiig.  Homers: E. Johnson (2iul) and (7th» ; Cramer (.2nd). (Second gamej :  Boston ..........30  Philadelphia ......(H  Kline and Connally; Freiias and Cochrane.  Homer: .Tolley (Ist).  Detroit ........3  Chicago ......... . .0  Goldstein and Hayworth: Frazier and Grube.  Homer: Davis (2ud).  St. Loiiis-Oevelaud. rain, Washington-N'ew York, off day.  BOLD ROBBERY IS AÏÏEMPTED  Man Concealed in House Scuffles iih Mrs, Frank Cafiero for Possession of Bag \Vitii Money.  HEROIC GENERAL DIES  Charles Town, W. Va., June 27.— f/P,i—General F. E. Bamford, 00, hero of the Battle of Cantigny with the  A hold robbery was attempted at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Cafiero in Gulfport Saturday night when a man c-ncealed in the house struck .Mrs. Cafiero on the arm in an attempt to sccure a bag containing money which she had brought from the fruit store on 2öiii avenue. After a struïgle in which Mrs. Cafiero received bruises, (ho robber was frightened av.-ay and did not get the money.  I\lr. and Mrs. Cafiero went to their residence from the fruit store about 11 o'clock Saturday night in an automobile. Mrs. Cafiero entered the hoitse from the front while Mr. Cafiero vent around t'> the garage in the back with the automobile.  When Mrs. Cafiero entered the front door and attempted to turn on the electric light, a man cucealed jn the house struck her on the arm and ntlemiited to grab the money sack which she carrieti. A tu-sle ensued and ;Mrs. Cafiero called for help. Tills frighteiicd tlie roWxT who  Americah expeditionary forces dur i/ig the World war, died suddenly to- i made his escape without stopping to  day.  General John J. Pershing paid hiwh tribute to Genf^ral Bamford in his book on the war. General Bamford w;is retired from (he army and for the past ten years had lived in West \'irginia. He is a native of Maryland.  His widow, formerly Martha Byrd. of Richmond, Va., survives.  jiii-k 11)1 the money wliii h had fallen on the flo^r. It was discovered later ilia' the electric light globe had ¡)een unscrewed so that it would not illuminate. police were notified but have uo clue that will le'ad to an arrest.  Mrs. Cafiero was not seriously injured but received a nervouj shock which confined her to her bed for several hours.  All-rt Hunt.f. the lotirth brother, | „r. SLyear- Id minister, was killed bv  was i;iiUei-,,,od to lie i„ Sparian, UN. | ^ ¡,„],„f j,,  with Mrs. .lohu Hunter and .fobii. Jr.. | nft'lcf^ were i.aitHu; with f vc. \\';iiter. .\iiier;can airwa.vs ¡ó!ot '  Ibeîwepti St. L'wis and Omaha, had intended to return to S;. I.ouis by pbine today to niake his regular flight.  Harwood Concern Is Asset to Gulfport  -\mong industries of importance t t r;u::port is that of Hardwimils, In,., that niaiuraiüs a baruwi.'od viit¡-a;'e  ' Neitlier th-? Gulfport postmaster U'.'r offi<'ials a; the local airport knew anything about (he opening of a proposed air mail route from New Orleans to Gulfport.  ij i:.'in' les  li.-ir(lw.,.od lumber  t.) solvi n.\v, Inclu<led in this number thnoigh th.^ ii.>rt to I'ngland. The <,,.(> <;4 liaiiks re>t >red to solvency. (S|'i'ora;;e \r!rd l"c:i'ei! i.n T.ltb avelli 1!).".1ì .nnd !U lliiiniiarions of wlii'o ; i, e and tlie <i. A S. 1. J{. îj. lu were comp'eted durane the ye;:;- 3!i;;i. a i.-iiit i.ui to st-U'ii'i; Itaniwo'.d lumb-r.  'I'bc it'^O banks liijuidated by receir-j i he . i.ini.any .'per.ite< n mill at the ' ^-aricad of flour to be 'istributed in ers  Carload of Flour  Shipped to Biloxi  .Al.ivor Kennedy. î.ical Red Cri>i< c!i;i inna i;. recel', ed a (f-le^ram t-d.ty tir.inciiig tiie iiif.iriiiat il ili.nt the  had assets including assets ac- ; yard. rmpli>.vinc from sev. ii t  10  {(uired subsequent to failure, a;;gre-patinc The capital of  the banks was 9109,582,920 anif there were levied by the Comptroller of the Currency stock assessments against theifl .st;a'^kh"l!Îers in the fiuiount cf X7.'i.i;ts.21(l. The cille^»-t lolls from these a'^sets. inclndin-,' ei:f-  siis alloweii and c.illeit Íoíis viock .-!-se.-S(.!eii;<, s :¡!i; ¡r;! I fd by e-ceivrr'.s final rcp<>it, am-'ointt'd t?  (Coatiiiucd on page  tiie Bibixi vicinity ihrough the Red ' "ro-s, had b,va >hlpp<'d Saturday from the Cadick Milling Co. mills in Grand View, ind. The flour totaling 220 barrels or 1760 24-pound sacks, will arrive in two or three days and due notice (if (lie di-^tribntion will he Oak, potdar anil magn.di:i lumlier made thnoigu tlie Daily Iler.ild. A the ¡.¡lids ii;:n<ned mo-tly by the meeting of the local Red Cross ex«-ti-  men who si:te ¡be lunii'cr .'itid rip it into widths i)reiu«-ct''ry to shipping it.  This mill is op.^raied most of the time and gives emidoynicnt to men during the depression in busine.--s.  fr.nn j I lardwciods, 1 uc.«rjeir.iled. At tircsciit c,i¡¡i¡k;i!i,*- has b'-en g.nlng 'n ccii»ideralile vhipno'ius from the western i>art of the state.  ihe committee v,;!Iudd J.'ist week to make plans f.o- the di.stribution of tiie flour (o needy families. E. E. Moore will serve as chairniau.  feudists ,-,r I.ondou. Kentucky.  Garner Appears Before Committee  "U'a.shingtoD, June 27—(JP)—Intent on obtaining passage of adetiuate relief legi.sl.ntion, Speaker Garner today appeared bet'ore Senate and | House c..nferet-ci seeking .<1)1 airreement. • on tlie .«2..".(Ki.(KiO.O<i(t .jobless aid bill. | The ceoiferees .•<,nsidered it lomear- i ly three iioiiis. and tiien iiroke up ' without ai'recme;:t. to meet again later today.  rii airman Ne.rbeik i>f the Set'ate managers indi'ated, however, there was a disposltb>n to accept Presideitt i Hoover's desire that the loans to state i be made on a basis of need instead of ; population.  The national economy bill—the second vital link in adjournment plans— was stalled in conference, with Garner sayir^ he would reappoint the same hotiSe conferees, two of vrhon) are in </hicago, to compose house and Senate differen. es. The absent members will not return before Wednes- ; daj'. ' 1  GULFPORT AT THE CROSS ROADS  flavor J. W. Mliner has issue,! a pr'ic!ainatic.>ti de-i-uatiiig AVedncsday afternoon as a h.alf-h._diday in (.¡uh'port in order to enable the community to give its freest and fullest c"i;-i(ieiMti"a to the organization of the propos"ti new bank.  M.Tvor ]\lilner in his proclamation requests stores and other places of business to close so that those who b-dleve th.:' pr(jposed new bank is essential to community welfare may roll up their sleeves and work for it.  Jtily 15 is the date which has been .set fin- tli'» oie-uitig e.f the new bank.. Thus it will be seen th.at .¡ily a brief siiace remains in v.iilch to smooth om what, (lifl'erences riiay exist b-''-tweeiL the organizers i.if lite bank and ne'U-asseninig deie.'-itors, if the bank is to open as scheduled.  As far as can be seen at this time.- fa li're to fiiieii tne b.-itik • on July 3,5 will automatically mean llqitidatlon, a- it is htirdly conceivable that the organizers of the. bank wlil extetn! tiie'r reorganization efforts beyond the date fixed by the ComptroHer of the Currency in the creditors' agreement which h.ts been circulateJ among depositors for the past several months.  .On the one hand, Vi^ceiitance of the plan ;ipi.ri.\ed by 'he Compti-niler of the Currency will metiti orderly lirjiiidaiion of th-J assets of the old bank taken over by the new bank. Ae-ceptatjco of the comp! ridler's iiinii me.tns more th.-in- tbar: Jr gii;i.'-.-intees a home bank opprtued by Jiome people for the benef.t o: ii.iim? pe..j,le.  Such a bank would bold n? its most sacr.-d d';iy the proiecii'.n I'f f\ery business firm, l.;rge or sin;;!', in the com:iunii!>". A ii'UiK' bank after all is no more and no less than the translation of the community itself.  Liquidation—and w'nat? Probably comminiity dissension, brother arrayed against brother, the ideals of solidarity upon which Gulfport was bailt, destroyetl.  Truly may it be said that Gulfport is at (be crc^s roads. Its iieopie will be given an o!ii"K.run;iy Wednesday to choose the direction whicli th.y shall follow.  Chicago. June 27.—(,.iP)—In a keynote speech bristling with denunciation of the Hoover administration, Senator Alben W. Barkley today urged the Democratic national convention to favor a vote by the people on repealing the eighteenth aniendnnent and calli^d upon the nation to turn the Rejuiblicans out of office.  Describing the Republican plank on prohibition as "a promisctious aiSlo-moration of scrap-lumber.'' the Ken-tuckian said the Democrats should recommend passage of a congressional residution repealing the ISth amendment. to be Voted osi by state conventions chosen solely for that purpose.  Barkley denounced the Republicans and President Hoover for the "exhor-bitant and indefensible rates" of the Smoot-Hawley tariff act and promised to "lift tariff-making above the sordid processes of log-rollers and back-scrat(diers."  He excoriated th.-' administration's farm policy and said the Democrats would itndertake "to remove from the shoulders of agriculture a ,i)ortion of the unnatural burden which it bears because others have been able to shift it there through special legislation in their own behalf."  PROMISES BROKEN  Paying his respects to the Hoover administration, the keynoter recalled that the President "and his Republican Congress took charge of the gov-ernment" on March 4, 1929, and added:  "But every prediction, every promise, every assurance made by them to obtain votes has turned to ashes in their hands, and every pretense has been exposed in all Its naked affectation.  "AgriciiUiire has continued its eol-la]ise. Industry has languished beyond any prcviotis record. Credit has be"u restricted until finance and ju'o-dticiivc enterprise are frightened and stagnant and there is con.stantly marching a greater" army of unemployed men and women in search of honest toil than has ever been experienced by this or any other nation."  "There is nothliLg" wrong with this republic," he added, ''except that it has been mismanaged, exploited and demoralized for more than a decade by a leadership incomparably shortsighted and bereft of true statesmar-ship, incapable of understanding and dealing with fundamental causes, and incapable even now in (he midst of its fearful havoc of understanding the extent of its own mischief."  18TII AMEND.AIENT Concerning the Eighteenth amendment, Barkley said "so long as it is a part" of the Constitution "no citizen of the republic has a legal or moral right to violate it," and added: "Whatever may be the divergent views of men and women on the merits or demerits of the P^ighteenth Amendment as a national policy, it is incnceivable (hat this or any other parr of the Consiitutlon of the Unit-id States should apply to only a part and not the whole of the American nati'jn. That great instrument declares that "this C'onstitution and the laws inade in pursuance thereof shall be the supreme law of the land.' But it cannot be the supreme law of the land if it can be obrojated by the people of a part of the land while remaining in force over the rest of ih' in. Such a c uiception destroys the very n.-itiire and srnieiitre of the Con-stinilion. for if it can be made thus (piailfy one of Its provisions it  Proposed Change In Rules Expected To Stir Up Fight  By BYRON PRICE Chicago Stadium. June 27. Cheering and demonstrating as its orators lamliasteil the Republiains and asked for prohibition repeal, the Democratic national convention began  ROOSEVELT GIVES I P  FIGHT TO CH.^GE RULE  Albany. N. Y., June 27. (.'Pj— Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt^ uxlay telegraphed sttpporters at the Democratic national convention to cea.se their efforts to abrogate tlie two-thirds convention rule.  The governor ¡¡¡dicated he was confident of nomination without resorting to a change of (he long observed rule of the Democratic party.  today with a session peaceful enough on the surface but encircled with a tightening ring of controversy.  In the .saddle temporarily, at least, the Roosevelt men took complete charge of temporary organization, having their way withottt opposition on every convention committee. The troubles stirring underneath was seared over for the moment by outward harmony as the big party conclave vyent through the pre-arranged motions of getting its work under way.  It was a cheering, seething convention, nevertheless, in old time style, it almost started parading and demonstrating before it came officially into being. On the floor the banners of nearly a dozen candidates recorded the rivalries which will come to their destinies later in the week.  A crowded convention floor and but partly filled galleries was swept witli roaring applau.se again and again as many of the most colorful figures of the party got u]) on the floor and platform. It was almost one continuous ovation as they came in one hy one—William G. McAdoo. John W. Davis, Albert C. Ritchie, Alfalfa Bill Miirra.v, Huey Long, James J. Walker, John .r. Rnskob and many beside. Big Senator Alben Barkley, of Kentucky, the temporary chairman was greeted with an ovation of his own as he appeared on (he flag draped platform to deliver the party keynote, the high peak of the largely cut and dried program of first-day preliminaries.  Tho real work of the convention begins late today when the committees meet to hear credentials contests, write a platform, and take up many other j)arty troubles, including the much embattled subject If the twok thirds rule.  BITTER INDERCLRREXT  Chicago, June 27.—(,iPi—With the D-minant forces of Roosevelt of New York divided and quarreling among themselves, and the opposition rally-ing, the Democratic national convention was called together for it.s opening session today amid enmities and resentments seldom matched in party history.  (Continued on page six)  EUCHARISTIC MEETING ENDS  .Several Hundred Thousand Catho-Ijs Hear Pope in Radio .Vddress To Dublin .\ssemhiv.  t  { may be made ;o (inalify all of (hem. I This Ts'ould be the end of the Con-' Slit lit ¡.111 itself.  "ruder these clrc'unsiances this : ciinvention owes it to the ]ienp]e of ' the n;nion to make its (b'cJar.Ttion 1 lU'iin this suli.iect clear, iiiolerstand-; abb- and tineiiuh ocal. There U n'J ; reason ¡iy the people shoii'd he deceived or deluded. Tiiere is no re.i-soii why .T political declaration should look in every direction and sec n^dh-  "In onl'V, ih'Tcfore. fo obt/tin the ]»r'sent will i.f the American peotib' 1.11 this suii.i^er of u'liversal contr"-ve:-y. tju's ein\en ion should in the  !>l.'!if"nii liere jo ¡ip adopted reeom-! ''' 111'tid tlie passage 'ny ("onzress of a  Ke>oIution repealing the Elgliteenth Am.-no'nient aar! its .submis.sjon fo '.iio ¡leojdç of tlie states through ronven-tions whose de'egatrs shall be chosen up'>n this ;s-ue alone.  WANTS CLEAR VOTE '"If the people .Tre to pass again i:r)on this (¡uestion, let tii.'m pass i:j' n It ill such bald, naked .tnd un-e(:uivo(al terms as to mtike tuoir de-cls|(U! ¡iite¡i¡ger¡t ""anil certain.  "if tie ir verdict sii.tH be in favor "f retaining tlie Eighteenth Amend-in. iit in the Ci.nstii'i'ion, let every true eitiz't! I.f tiie nalicrn ac.-ept the <;'.civ;,,n .'¡lid .".b.-d.; by it in letter and in -plri'.  "If til" v.-rdlct s'nall ),(. f,,r the repeal of the .Vniend.nieiit then let every branch ' of the national sovernroent ex-r.-ise all the p.jwers they possess :o protect the states in the observance atid enforcement of the laws which tiiey shall enact to control, regulate or jirediibit the traffic in int"xicating liqitors. '  He ¡iromised that the D-m'"nTat9 «"uM "aliolish ever.r ¡¡soless oiiice, ever.v unnecessary bureau aud com-(Conticued on page iire).  Dublin, Jijne 27. /VP)—Several hun-dreil thousand Catholics, from all parts v'f the world, were on their way home today from the thirtv-first Eucharist ic congr...ss, which closed here .vesterday with a blessing from Pope Pius, radioed from Vatican City.  A million members of the churca heard the Pojie'.-, words of bro.-idcast by loud  Ic was believed here to have been the gre.itesc congres.ttion Christendom has known. The benediction f'db.wed a solemn pontifical masS and a great reli:,'ious procession 17  znilfM Jong.  The jiontiff had intended to spe.ik earlier but the transmission ^v ^ faulty and he was delayed.  "In tile n,'i/i.- of ¡he .Father, and the s..ti a„,i ,,(■ the Holy Gh...st, Amen." the pontiff began, .speaking in J.a till.  '•-'^io.st belored sons in Chrisc, I arli with yoii. Fir^t of ali, I am with you as a father with hU exultin? i sons- in order f. have not only by means of our cardinal legate but also by myself a certain participation in your eucharistic joy and triumph.  "Therefore, we together with yon, supplicate and ¡.ray that almighty and merciful God. placated by the prayers of bis e-liurch. gra.ciously concede in such i-reat triiitilatioa of all P'liples the gifts of union and peace, gifts ^vhich are. in f.Tcr, indicated ia the myst.'ry of the eucharist.  "J-'inally. o:;."- heart and our. l[p open to yi'ii to express our congratulations and impart to y.'U with very .special affection our apo.^tolic benediction."  The pageant aud glory ami fervor of the congres.s wove a rich tapestr.v of religion at its final .ses.5ion. Archbishop Jlichae] J. Curley of Baltimore c'debrated the pontifical high mass :n Phoeuix Park.  F<irty nations an<! Ireland, perhops more, were represented. Ten cardinals and scores of «rcbbisiiopi tu4 bi.sliiu>s atteuded.   

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