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Biloxi Daily Herald Newspaper Archive: June 22, 1832 - Page 1

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Publication: Biloxi Daily Herald

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   Biloxi Daily Herald (Newspaper) - June 22, 1832, Biloxi, Mississippi                                 8 pages  If yon do not receiT« yoor Her»ld  pio«:» phont befor« 6:30 p. m. 3T—Bilfjxi &0-<5nIfi»rt  The  Daily He rald  FOOD CONSERVATION  Is Ensagin? Attention of Wörnern Throughoat Coootj.  ASSOCIATED PRESS LEASED WIBE—NEA SERVICE  HERALD BUILDING, BILOXI  MISSISSIPPI COAST, WEDNESDAX AFTERXOOX. JFXE, 1&32  HERALD BUILDING, GULFPORT  15c A WEEK—VOLUJIE XXXIV—NUMBER 2R8  American Plan Of World Disarmament Offered Át Geneva  Thomas Grayson Appointed Adjutant General  Former Biloxian Chosen to Head State Guard Troops  ADVERTISEMENT CAUSES ARREST  c. n. Farmer OiarRpd With False Prptensp iii Connection With Employment Offer.  BrilMant Record In War Is Recalled By Conner's Choice  r.  I». Farnipr, re^iu'i-nt of Gult'por:, was arrestili by t'hiif of l'oli'-P Ben I ;riithir<l.s tlii« aft('rn< on oa a charge of falsf prciciise in counecliou with im .Tdvertisptncnt whifh has b^^n ap-jipnrins in ncwspapprs in north Mis-H'' was I.x1k<'(1 in jail, liulfport ofiii-prs wcrp said to have hf'fn spiirchin? for Fnrmpr sinrp their ait.Mition was railed to tho adv^rlise-ni'-iit.  'J'hp ndi-'Ttis-in-'ur in giH-stion i-head' d "Do Yuu W:nit Employme nt V" ;nul asscT s that Sr>.(H«).(X>0 is bciiiS spent ou tlip ,Mi~sis.sii/pi C'Sf^t by the federal govornment in a bnildin;; progMun." Thf advert isynicnt ^igtitd "Employment Kiireaii, port. .Vài«., and r»<juests of ft (M .>i it. b«  NEW REPEAL DEMANDSARE VOiCffiTODAY  Smith Announces Stand For End of Prohibition And Senator Hull Advocates Resubmission to People.  Marie Hartley Sentenced  To Year In Penitentiary  IS  Gnlf-the .sending refunded in oU  de.yi if \bt! applicant is not provided work.  The advertisement was denonnced as ioBccurat« by the Central Labor Union of Quifport at a meeting last jiigbt and by Luther W. Maples, state cununandir of the American Legion. The Labor Union in a resolution idopWd «t .'flflt night declared that "federal proapects on the Coast amount to coMiderably less than .$1,000,000 and that there are no other projects eitinr federal or other now in course of construction or contemplated in tlK near ^tiire." The Union placed itseif oh record as denouncing this advertisement and the employment bureau.  Commander Maples said be would request lyeglon posts throughout the .s ate to prevent unemployed Legionnaires from coming to the Coa.st in i-'^'^poDse to the advertisement, as the Coast was already- supplied with a superabundance of labor. Mayor J. W; Milner and B. C. Coi, spcrelary of the Gulfport Chamber of Commerce, also condemned the advertise-nicnt.  Farmer was arrested this afternoon when he ■was found receiving mail in rpply 1o the employment advertising. The change of false pretense was filed by County Prosecuting Attorney Gaston Hewes in the county, court. Farmer at one lime lived on West Beach and later in Broadmoor. He W.1S !;iiown as a traveling salesman while at Gulfport. He is married.  Jackson, .Tune 22.—i/Pi—Thomas L Gray.son, one of Mississippi's out-slan(iing World war veterans, today was appointfd adjutant greueral of the state by Gov. Scnnett Conner.  Grayson succeeds the late Gen. Erie C. ."Scales, who shot himself to death in his office here a short time ago.  The new adjutant g'/nr-ral will assume the duties of the office immediately, (Jov. Conner said. .Since (ien. .■Scales' de.ith Aseislant; Adjutant Gen-•^lal B. J-'. Mc<''lellan has he^n in cliarse of the department. He will remain as Grayson's assistant.  WAR RECORD  Grayson's appointment recalls a distinguished "R'orld War record made with the 28th infantry, fir.st division. He is one of a few ^VUississippians who have received the distinguished service cross. He also was awarded the Croix de Guerre and is a member of the Purple Heart, oldest U. S. Military order.  While in France he commandetl for a time' General Pershing's honor guard. He was twice woiinded.  He served as commandant of the Gulf Coast Jlilitary Academy at Gulfport. He formerly lived at Biloxi. Until his appointment today, Grayson has been employed in the income tax division of the state tax department.  The apopintrnent is for the duration of Gov. Conner's administration. The office carries a salary of $2,700 a year.  As adqutant general. Grayson is in command of Mississippi's national guard forces.  Chicago. .Tune 22.—(/P)—Renewed demands fm- a prohibition repeal submission plank came from Democratic chieftains today as th'>y as'sembled on the convention scciie for the preliminary njaneuvers of the battle for the presidential nomination.  Alfred E. Smith, a leader of tiie fii'ht against i'ranklin I). Roosevelt, demanded rerical of prohibition and immediate revision of ti>e A'olstead act.  Senator H\ill of Tennessee, prominently nn-ntiont'd for chairman of the resolutions commit tee, said tiie concensus (it wets and drys n the piirty fiivori'd submitting l(] the states the ouestion of retention of repeal of the eiglitecuth uiueiulmoiit. JiuH is dry and a Roosevelt supporter.  He declared, however. )u-oliil)it ion was subordinate to the economic issue.  Bandit Girl Draws Sentence Despite Pleas of Her Attorneys  Three Nominated  In City Primary  .7os. yy. Milner was declared nominee for nnyor of the city of Gulf-liort and (i'^rge W. Odom and Ivan Hallci:.' 'or commlBsionerg by the cìt.v I>eiii,,': .onimittee Monday afternoon ; "> ing Saturday's pvimary. .7. I.. : !oi-. chairman of the committee. .iiiii'innced.  .lunp :!(! was the date set by the Democratic ciunmitfee to hear the protest filed with the committee by Charles R. Haydon. one of the de-frateil candidate* for mayor.  RE.4RED IN BILOXI  Tlie now adjutant general is a son of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Grayson of Biloxi. He was born in Alabama but lived Jn Mississippi since early childhood and attended the Campgrounds school at Bilnxi. He was at one time cashier of the Bank of Pass Christian and later entered the real-estate business on the Coast, being one of the larger operators during the boom. He moved ■to Jackson about two years ngo and was in insurance bTisiness before. becoming connected with the state tax commission.  S.\n ANNIVERSARY  New York. June 22.—(/«')—Today wa« a sad anniversary for Colonel and Mrs; Charles A. Undbergh.  It was Mrs. Lindbergh's birthday and also the birthday of little (^baríes Anpustus I.iudi'eruh, .fr.. if he had 3'ved, be v,io;l,l liave b'^-en two years old ii'day.  One y ar ago tuday—they had his picture tak'ji with his birthday cake on which burned one lajge candle.  Today h:s parents passed in seclusion on the es;ai" of .>rrs. Lindbergh's mother, Mrs. Dwight W. ^Morrow, at EnKlewood, N. J.  VETS OF CIVIL WAR GATHERED  Descendants of I.<»e and Grant Have Flares On Today's Program at Richmond Reunion.  TODAY'S  GAM  _t£  ____CM >0  . . . .(HK'î an'd Tale  Wyalt  Washington .. Cleveland ....  Cofinian and Myatt. Piiila<lelphia Chicago ...  Ma hilt fey arid Grube. Bos!t>n ... Detroit ...  ]>lsenbre Ruel.  NATIONAL  Cinrinna'i . . .(I41 (i.Tl  Boston......UKt ()<«  Carrnll and I.oniiurdi Pruiit (.'tin and .■^pnhrer. SI. l..ii:¡s . . . .(HM) (MKI 0 .N. w York . . .ItHt (»20 ;>  JlaJlaiian anti Mancuso and Hogau.  H' uit rs : rullis ."iih. M>>ore Pitlsioirgh . . . l.'U 1(K» 0 i-;r.>oklyn . . . .tK«t It»! I  Kreuch ;ini| (Jra'-e; ."<baii|e. Quinn (2ud) auii I'ii-inicii.  H-'Uiers ; Gra. e 'I'nd. AYiNon 6th.  riiicttgo ......(ViO (K)  Phila.Mphu ...(»24 20  (irim.'s and Henisl. y ; Rhem and V. Da vi-,  II iner<: Moore. 2ttd ; Whitney. 2i >i ; Hur^i 3ni, Davis 3rd, Klein itihi  Richmond. Va.. Jun^v 21.~(/P)— Richmond battlefield parks, an area studded with battle sites on which the grimly contesting Confederates for weary months successfully defended Richmond, capital of the Confederacy, will be dedicated today.  l>r. George Boiling Lee. grandson of General Lee and U. S. Grant IH. grandson of the I'nion leader, have both accepted invitations for the ceremony ,which will be featured by an address by Major-Genoral Lytle Brown, chief of engineers of the United S'tates army, lie will bp itUro-ducetl by Dr. Douglas S. Freeman, Richmond new.spaper editor.  The park dedication comes late on today'.s program. This morning the Confederate veterans meeting here in their forty-second convention listened t>- welcome.s voiced by rcpre.sentatives of the state of A'irginia and the city of Richmond.  Meanwhile thp Confederated Southern Memorial Association wa.« meeting in its o3rd convention at the Jefferson Hotel. After the morning busine.s3 session and presentation of officers, the deleg^nes had luncheon-at th<. Second Baptist church before leaving for the battlefield dedication.  A third convention, the T.Tlh annual gathering of Sons of Confeder-  Í .Tte V eterans, was also meeting in  Richmond. They too centered th^ir d-iy's program on the battlefield dedication exercise.  The three conventions, joined at the battlefield exei-cises. along with a throng of visitors, will hear again the story of the valiant defeiise of Rich-mond.  AL SMITH ARRIVES  By .SAM B. BLEDSOE ( Associated' Pre.ss Staff Writer) Chicago. June 22.—(/P)—A1 Smith's arrival, .McAdoo's approach, the Garner .statement for repeal of the ISth amendment, and a growing tensity among the Uooseypit forces today set the I>emo<'ratic political pulse pounding just MX days before the convention opens.  !Many i)arty leaders here were pager to see Smith but even more, wanted to know what his promised .statement would hold.  There were those who felt the tittilar head of the party, apparently in dead earne.st about getting the nomination for himself, would flatly give his reas9ons for his break .with Franklin D. Itooscvelt. the man who nominated him at Dallas in 3!t28,  And then, it might be only a call for the party to at.-t boldly and decisively. i)re])aratory to an onslaught on the Republicans, or it might urge, perhaps, support for Jouett Shoiise as permanent chairman of the convention.  Incidentally, the scrap over the permanent chairmanshij) is .scheduled as the convention's first liead-on collision between the opposing groiijis. It may decide whether Gov. Roosevelt will be the nominee or only the nian who almost got the noniiiiation.  Shouse su))portprs charge double-crossing in the decision of the Roosevelt men to support Senator Thomas J. Walsh of Montana for the po.«t. There are counter charges and James A. Farley, Roosevelt generalissimo, claims the deciding factor—the necessary votes.  Regardless. Sou-c's friends were jiredicting today if the ballot were only a few hours away, he would be given the Ravel.  (Continued on page two)  .MARIE ANTOINETTE HARTLEY  rewstronT  loses again  AnoHier State Court Holds Act Unconstitutional — Higher Tribunals To Give Opinions.  Pioneer Automobile Builder Dies at 72  J.ackson, June second time, ^Mississippi's new con-gres-iional redistricting act hag been dci'lared unconstitutional by state courts, but the final decision is expected to come only from the U. S. supreme court.  The Hiuds county court here lat.» yesterday ruled void the act which only last week was held unconstitu-tio)ia! by the Pike cotinty chancer,T court.  Judge . Wiley H. Potter of Hinds poiinty circiiir: court issued an order, restraining the secretary of state from placing names of candidates on sample ballots and from certifying returns in the election of congressmen as yirovided under the new act.  A]iiieal.s from botii these courts will be licard Q'^hursday by the state supreme court. Attorneys have said they will carry this ruling to the U. S. supreme court.  The new act combines the seventh and eighth districts. Judge Potter ruled tiiat the new act was void because it failed to comply with the conures'^ional reapportionment act which specified that districts must ¡>e contiguous. comi>act and as nearly as possible of etiual poptilation.  I'nder the state act a single congressman ,would be elected in November ircim the combined seventh and eighth districts. Fighters of the ni t have contended that the combining of the districts by the legislature in seeking to reduce the state's congressmen from eight to seven, was done without regard to the population of the new district. They contend tliat the seven congressmen should be elected from the state at large in November.  Cleveland. June 22.—(.¿P.i—One of the most famous men of the automotive industry. Alexander AVinton. Sr., vvho was generally known as the first commercial manufacturer of an auto-  mol)ile. died at his nigiit at the age of 72. He had been ill two weeks.  Long before the world ever dreamed the part automobiles were to jilay in modern life, Winton was building cars in a little Cleveland factory and his first automobile was running on the streets of this city as early as ISii.'i.  By ]f)0.'i, while the infant indtistry was still generally confined to '"one-lungers" and "two-lunger^." .-iccording to the number of cylinders, Mr. Win-ton had built an eight-cylinder racing car. which he entered and drove thai year in the .Tames Gordon Bennett cup race in Ireland.  In those days, an automobile still looked like a demoniacal monster to many people, and Winton lost the race, he said later, bei'ause someone init candles in the gasoline tank "to keep away the devils.''  Agents Acquitted In Death of Texans  22.—(/P)—Pro-  Dallas. Tex.. June hi!)ition Agent L. C. D. Ileaton were free honie here last I respiJiisibility for the  Brown,  Hubbell  rth.  Congressman's Wife Fined Fifty Dollars  Washington. June 22.—(/P)—Mrs. Bertha Huddleston, wife of Representative Huddiston. oi Alabama. I was fined .SoO in police court today f ''^-''y-after pleading guilty to a charge of j reckless driving.  •Mrs. Huddieston wa.« arrested, along with a male comi)anion the  Curtis Now Says Contact Stories Altogether True  Smith and N. today of legal slaying of F. 31. -Mctilotlilin, countvy storekeejier. .Vjiril ."s. United States District Judge William H. At well, ordered an instructed verdict ill their favr late yesterda.v.  On motion of the prosectition all other charges against the .igents were (iismissed. as well as those against r.iuidy Hoard, an informer. ^McGloth-lin was killed and his wife wounded when the a.^ents arranged a rendezvous wi;h a suspected liootlegger at his store. The McGb'thlius thought the agents were roiibers.  NOT REINST.\TED  Washington. June 22.—OP)—L. C. Smith and N. 1). Heaton. suspenden lirohibition agents freed in Texas yesterday on charges of killing a storekeeper, will not be reinstated.  Prohibition Diref.'tor W(J idcock said today the agents had not asked for reinstatement and that he believed rh''y wt're undt'sirable as mom-licrs of his enforcement staff.  Marie Antionetie Hartley, L8-year-old Chickasaw, Alabama girl, self-confessed perpetrator of two daring hold-ups about 2i .months ago, was sentenced to a one-year term in the state penitentiary this morning -by Circuit Judge Walter A. ■VVbitc.  A crowded courtroom, composed largely of women and girls who had come to court primarily to witness the imposition of sentence and to hear an anticipated statement from the ''girl bandit'' which it had been indicated she desired to make prior to receiving the court's sentence.  Tears moistened the eyes of many, men as ^well of those of the w^eaker sex as T. J. White, counsel for tha girl and S. C. IMize spoke at length for leniency in the girl's behalf. Emotional display grew more pronounced when the father of the young woman in a voice shaken with emotion importuned the court to let him take hi.s daughter back home where a sick and heart-broken mother needs her.  Testimonials addressed to the court and said to have been signed by every officer and citizen of the girl's home town attesting to her "good" character and reputation prior to her coming to Gulfport some.- 6 months ago, were read b.r her counsel in connection with his plea for mercy for his client.  Her only explanation as to why she boldly at pistol point robbed the Triple X filling station and a few nights later robbed the Gersuk Grocery store in her statejnent to the judge was that ''it was a foolish or kid prank'' and that she "was fed into it" by keeping "bad company."  S|je had alway.<t obeyed her parents and did . right before she left home a few months ago to have "what I thought was a good time," she declared.  In imposing the l-year penalty. Judge White .said it was the first time in his long experience ag a judge that he had been called upon to sentence a girl to the .state penal institution. He spoke at some length upon the effort necessary on his part to prevent sympathy from getting the better of duty before declining io defer sentence or impose a suspended penalty and concluded with the imposition of the 1-year sentence.  This sentence was on only one of the three cases against her, the judge reminded Miss Hartley, and added further that the sentence on the other 2 cases would be deferred. These, having a maximum of 15 years each, would never be imposed so long as her conduct was what it should be.  BYRD C.\SE  The first case going to trial today when court reconvened following a 2-day recess was that <»f J. S. Byrd, charged with arson in connection with the alleged incendiary burning of an insured but unoccupied hous'j in Gulfport.  Byrd, it was said, held a one-year lease contract with an option to purchase the property from the Gulfport Building and Loan Association, and that it was heavily insured.  Byrd. who was arrested following an investigation by the state fir? marshal, i]. E. Blount was jointly indicted with Robert A. Murrah and Will Lawren-c-e, colored, by last week's grand jury.  Trial of this case began shortly before noon and will probably continue throughout the afternoon. A severance was granted in the case and (Continued on page six)  HEARING ENDS, RUSSELL WILL WRITEOPINION  Carl Marshall On Witness Stand Declines to Say Whether Or Not He Was Guilty of Blackmail.  Decision by Chancellor D. Russell on the petition of Carl .Marshall for reinsia^emonc ag a practising attorney in the courts of Mississippi will be embodied in a written opinion to be filed the latter part of this week as a part of the record in the case, it wag announced by the chancellor late yesterday following comideti'on of the two-day hearing at Gulfport.  With the testimony of Mr- Marshall, who yesterday afternoon took witness stand in behalf of his  Hoover Proposal to Cut Armaments By One-Third Unacceptable Td France  the  Norfolk. Va., June 21—i.-Pi—John Hughes Curtis today repudiated his ; startling statement that bis negotia-1 tions for tlie r-'lurn of the kidiitiped i Lindbergli baby were eritirelv imau'i-  In a statement issu-^i through lis Flemingtim. N. J., attorney, the Nor-fidk boat builder said that his storv on contact with the baby's kidnapers  nighr of Jiine she was driving collide<i with two other car.;. .<he was booked at th.it lime on a charge of driving while driitik.  The charge was changed by Stanley Deneale, assistant corporation counsel, when Mrs. Huddleston ap-¡eare<l in court. Mrs. Hnildleston's «•• lupacion. xvho was arri'st<><l for intoxication. did not appear and forfeited HO tolUwral.  afb r the machine ¡'''f 'I'-'ir representatives was entirely  tr..e.  He cb.ar.ged the Xeu- .let-i'V state ¡lo-lice with refusal to follow bis c!ur«. "Ins'tead." Curtis complained, "lliey chose to believe 1 was a liar and worked on that assuminion rather than that the clue.s; were true."  W. (.'. Pender. Curtis' Norfolk at-torne.v, will leave for Fiemington ,<oon to aid in preparing his client's de-ieiiM.  OB-IECTIONS TO SI ND.\Y  TRAINS LS DIS.MLSSED  \V::.<hington. June 22.—(-4')—The Ituerstate C<iuimerce Commission today declined to go into the qtiestion of; Sunday operation of trains.  It dismissed a complaint filed by Xoah W. Cooper. Nashville. Tcun.. •ittorney, wlio asked the conunisaion to iin' -tigate and order the railroads to cease sabbath operation.  The complaint was dismisr.sed on njo-tion of the Pennsylvania Railroad '."oinpany. the Missouri Pacific Rail-¡iiad Co.. and the Association of Railway Fxe<iuives.  SM\LI, CRAFT WARNLNG  New (trleaiis, June 22—(.¿P)—The nciirher bureau here today ¡.'«iued the following small craft warning.  "Small craft warning indicated lOr.'ifl A. M., Corpu.s Christie area to Galveston, Te-va*^. fresh easterly win(N and possibly sQualls today and tonisht."  Roland Weston Offers 25,000 Acres Land For Game Preserve  An offer of the use of as much as 25,(XX) acres of land for a preserve was made to the executive committee of the Mississippi Association for Conservation of Wild Life, which closed its convention at the Buena Vista Hotel yesterday. The taxes on the land are to be paid by the donor. S. E. Morton. Brookhaven, was named chairman of a committee to confer with Roland Weston./who offered the land, located near Logtown.  The executive committee announced the next convention will be held at Jackson.  At the closing sessions among the resolutions passed was one providing for the formation of local county units to co-operate in the conservation of wild life. Civic, educational and patriotic organizations will be asked to assist.  The association expressed its deepest appreciation for the many courtesies extended to the members. Miss Faynne Cook, executive secretary, was thanked for her unselfish labor in guiding the contention. Resolutions of appreciation to the hotel, Coast Guard and Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Rollins, Miss Lucy Ewing and Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Detweiler for their interest as nature guides, were adopted. Tlie Biloxi Game and Fish As.sociation also was .praised and thanked for its efforU »5 Tell as the others who assist in IJic coB£lBCtiOiU  plea for reinstatement coming as th" dramatic climax of nearly two full days' of testimony by ajiproximately 50 volunteer character witnesses, the jietitioner rested his case and only documentary evidence including ccr-t;iin records of the- stipreme court's disbarment of iMarsball List November were introdttced by M'eb!) able, president of the State Bar Association, which is formally, contesting the reinstatement of iMarshall.  Argument of counsel, including J. L. Taylor and W. i:. Guice fi>r the petitioner and Mr. Venable for the contestants, was concluded at 7 o'clock yesterday evening and Chancellor Russell .after a very brief discussion of the ease and the two conflicting theories advanced by opposing counsel, announced that his decision would be embodied in a writ^-teu opinion. This ojjinion will be, filed as a part of the reccu'd that will go to the supreme court which, it is understood, must review the case under provisions of the npw State Bar Act under which the reinstatement of Marshall is sought.  The peak of interest in the hearing which attracted a crowded court:-room throughout the two ' full days' came when Marshall was called to the witness stand and admitted on examination of counsel that ho was "profoundly regretful of ever liaving been involved in the ¡natter ivhi.-h brought about disbarment'' and declared he was "sincerely repentant."'  Stating that he had no other business or means of livelihood other than the practise of law, iiarshall declared that he was now "virtually a bankrupt." He had bowed to the decision of the supreme court which disbarred him last November, he said, and since that time had no!: engaged or attemiited to engage in the practise of his profession.  As regards "rehabilitation of character'' since disbarment, Marshall characterized his conduct aiu.l habits as "as nearly jKu-fect as a man could make them.''  On cross examination by Venable, the petitioner was asked the diro.-t (piestion as to whether he was guilty of blackmail and false swearing under oath as reflected by the supreme court finding resulting in his dis-' barment. but on rbjection ot' bis counsel to this qitestion. the Chancellor held that ^larshall would not be required to answer.  It was left to Marshall's discretion as to whether he would answer the interrogation as to his willingness to make a full disclosure as to what was done with the .'>(!2.l)00 .^lar-shall claimed to have paid to one Jack Wilson, but which the supremo court ruled v;as an unbelievable stor.v.  Faced with the alternative of answering or not answering, lie chose the latter, but took occasion to testify at length upon certain phases of the transaction as regarded his con  SMITH RECIPE FOR SUCCESS  "Write Clear Platform and Nominate .^ie" New Yorker Says If Democrats Would Win Election.  Chicago, June 2r2—(JP)—Unconditional rei)e;!l of the eighteenth amendment and immediate modification of the ^'olstead acr was called for today by Alfred E. Smith.  Chatting informally with newspapermen Smith said the half of one per cent provision in the ^'olstead act was nrhiiar.v and was put in there by the Anti-Saloon T.eague.  He added that if a prottosal for its repeal were not submitted to the resolutions committee he would submit one hiuisel;.  "Who is goiiii to be tlie nominee?" Smith was .asked.  "The convention will decide," he said.  "^^'ho is yoiir prcfereticc?''  "Alfred K. Smi;h."  "Who have yn picked for your running mate'?"  "I haven't thought that out yet," he reiilied.  ROOSEVELT "BALLYHOO"  Smith reiterated that talk about Roosevelt being nominated on the first ballot was "a little ballyhoo."  He refused to predict how many votes the New York delegation would give liim.  (Continued on page eight)  Guarded Approval Is Given Proposition By Delegates of Great Britain  BILBO MAY BE IN RACE AGAIN  Former Governor Says He Is Seriously Considering Becoming Candidate For Seat In Congress.  Jackvon, June 22.—(.V,~-A familiar J'igufp in .^fi»issippi politics today was considering entering the race for conu:ress.  Former (iovernor Tiieo. G. Bilbo, who twice .^served as the state's chi"f executive, atinounced tuilay he was seriously weiirhing the advisability of filin- for Coiigrcs.^.  The former executive indicated his decision liin'^ed largel.v on whether the congressional elections were thrown into the state at large, which would be done in the event the state supreme court holds the new redistricting act tinconstitut ional-  Toni(U-orw is the final day for candidates to file. It also is the da.v whcti the constitiitionalit.v of tlio Blair-White r'apportionment bill is argued before the high court. Since no decision is e.xpected from the supremo court before next week. Secretary J. P.. .stnider of the Democratic state exei:utive committee, has advised all c.'imlidate.s to tile both from districts and from the state at large. Snider pointed out that by filing from both, all candidates would be eligible r'-ianiless of the outcome jf  (By The Associ.itpd Press)  President Hoover made a dramatic appeal in Washington for reduction of the arms of the world by one-third, at an estimated saving of ten to fifteen billion dollars in the next decade. His- proposals included abolition of tanks, chemical warfare, bombing planes and prohibition of bombardment from the air, and reduction in land armies, battles'-'Ps, aircraft carriers, cruisers, destroyers and subma-» rincs.  Hugh Gibson, chief of the American delegation read it before a crowded meeting of the disarmament; conference in (íeneva. The first reaction was guarded approval in general terms by Great Britain and .an  exiiression France-  of frank hostility by  the aci.  attack on the new redistricting  ({ov. Bilbo s.-iiil lie would announce lii,-: decisioii "b''fore tonight.'"  .Meanwhile the list of candidates for Congress continued to increase, Carl White, former state audito.' and now a member of the state rail-ro.'iil coiiiinission from the central district, has announced he will op-. ! ])Ose ("onL-ressinan Ross Collins of the  FRANCE OBJECTS  France, adhering to the thesi.«! which she never has deserted, found the proposal not at all to her liking. Joseph Paulboncour, the French war minister, said it was absolutely unacceptable and that France would raise the old question of security to Oppose ^it.  Sir "'John Simon, the British foreign secretary, described it as a vai-liable contribution to disarmament and said it wfould receive careful consideration.  Before the Président published hii plan it was approved fully by Secretaries Stimson, Hurley and Adams, by the chief of staff of the army, the chief of naval operations and by the entire American delegation at Geneva.  Actually it is an amjilification of the nine point program stibmitted by Hugh Gib.son. chief of the Geneva delegation, last ' February. It goes further than naval cuts but it permits retention of a 3.").000-ton submarine total, probably written in as a conces.sion to France.  BORAH APPROVES  Senator Borah, chairman of the Senate foreign relations committee, approved the proposal. Chairman Byrns of the House appropriations comniittee, said he was heartily in favor of arms reductions but suggested that the appeal would have been more timely before Congress hafl passed nest year's army and navy appropriations.  Senator Reed of Pennsylvania called it a "sound " proposal," and Chairman Vin.son of the House naval affairs committee said he was heartily in favor of it.  Chairman Collins of the House war departnient ai#propriatirns sub-committee s.Tid: "1 don't think Mr. Hoover knows anything about modern wart'are or he wouldn't want to reduce the only things' that are an.T good.''  HOOVER PLAN  Washington, June 22.—04=)—Prei!-dent Hoover, in a sudden and dra-inatic announcement at the White House today, proposed principles for reducing the arms of the entire world iiy nearly one-third-  AVith Secretary Stimson at hi-i side, the president read to a small (Continued on page eight)  nection with a Durant Paving contract controversy as an associate with the Jackson law firm of Howie. Howie and Latham. He denied that he was disbarred for false swearing or perjury as had been contended by counsel for the- contestants, but said his disbarment was for a technical or constructive blackmail or extortion and that the supreme court rejected as improbable his testimony and that of corroborating witnesses as to the^ disposition he h.id made of the money thus obtained. His regard for the proprietie.; would not permit him to (Continued on page six)  HRST PRIMARY FOR DIRECTORS  Sixteen Highest Shown In Twlay's Count Will Enter Second C. of C. Primary Closing June 28.  The election committee of the Gulfport Chamber of Commerce met this morning and counted the ballots in the first primary of the election to select eight dirtn-tors to succeed those members of the board whose term exidre this year. The sixteen highest, who will enter a second, are J. A. Alberts. Wm. Baylor, T. S. Clower. R. C. Cowan. M. Fi~h-burn. F. B. Hewes. Wade flatten. Ed Liiiscomb. Eustis McManus. n. T. Palmer, Judge'D. 51. Russell. H. M. Rollins. Clayton Rand. Joe Sal-loum, F'. dp L. Smith. Wm. Crowcll. Tlie ei^'iit new directors will b,. .selected from this list.  The office force is today preparing the ii.-illot for the se<-orid primary.-All ballots must be in the office liy Tuesday afternoon. June 2S. and the committee will meet We<lne.s<iay morning. June 20, to count the votes.  The committee serving this nioni-ing consisted of J. C. Wacker. .1. C. BicJi, 5. C, Cfl* aad E, R W^ilk^i,  fifth district if the race is fr..m districts. He dill not st.'ite whether be would be a candidate if the race is made ¡'r-m the state at large.  I'ractic.Tliy a!' incumbents have already filed with the secretary of state, and those whc.i have not are expected to before the time limit ex-¡lire? tomorrow.  Grave Robbers Flee, Shooting At Caretaker  Chica.'o. June 22—(>P)—A band of ghouls ai)]'aren;ly intent upon robbing the grave '■{ (¡''orge "Red" Barker, labor ra.-k.'t. er and public eiiemy recently slain iiy tnachine ;;unners. eti-gag'd in a pi-t d fi'-'ht with the care-t.'iker of Moiinr (.".iniiel cemetery early this morniirj. Tlie ghouls escaped, but not un'il tiicy hr.d shi.t several holes in the caretake's autojnobile. stopping piir-iiit.  The police advanc.nl the tlieory that perhap- the inrriiders were seeking valuable jciper^ or jewelry buried with -he -aiisster. They pointed "ut that an autonioliile truck in which til" men esf.iped coiilil easily have ¡■een to carry away Barker's  ca.-ket.  The nutn^'er of men in tiie band was lio; le.irn.fl. .lo^ejii! Soiiol. .'.(>, the caretak' T i-aiiie npon them slu.r'ly after mid!ii'.;ht while driving his automobile truck in the vicinity of the ISarker ;rnve.  They were beinling oyer Barker's srave. AS'hen S 'bol ask"d them what they were doing ;])ey answered him wi-ji a half dozen -hot-, .^oliol dr>'W hi< own pi-tol and fired baik nt the ho.;dltini< wjiile he bid l-ehind hi^ truck. Tlie ghous kept on firing unii; both front tires of Sobol's car. the h' o(I and the wind-hi--ki h.id been punctured.  .Monnt Cariiiel cemetery is situated in suburiuin iiiilside, several miles i west of .C]iicago> ciii l<Bi'f<li  FEAR TROUBLE IN GERMANY  Report Says Hitler Orders Follower« To .\rm Selves and Gather at Headquarters.  Berlin, June 22.—t/P)—The Communist newspaper Rote Fahne .«aid today Adolf Hitler's National Socialist legions were ordered to report ¡'.rmefl to their headqiiarters within 24 hours. Meanwhile the new German cabinet fartd an apiiarenily inevitable showdown between Hitler and tile state governments of th'' reich.  Blood flowed last night throughout Germany as the Nazis, Communists a'id police i'Might it out in many cities \uth guns and bludgeons. One Nazi wa^ shot and killed in Berlin and a "oung Nazi opponent was stabbed to dcatii in Essen.  Itozens were gravely injured in the •■series of riots. In Ojipeln one Nazi was reported dying as a result of a Communi.-t attack.  The cabinet today struggled with the problem of keeping it.« peace be-tw(in Hitler's irate demand that bis k'gions be permitted lo wear their unilorms in spite of the police of the str-t -s, and the insistence of the etato" government.^ that the constitution o£ the reich gives them ih- iK>\ver to put (iowii all movements they decide to be threatening.  Tap fighting last nisbt took place iri Berlin. Cologne, Wandsbeck, near Hamburg. Fraiikfort-am-Maiu. An-d'ruach, Varel. Kiel ami other towns.  A student riot result«! at Frankfort when National Socialist tuiiforms appeared on the university campus.  A navy parad^ at Kiel, comn*m-orating the scuttling of the German fleet at Scapa Flow after the war thirteen years ago. was cancelled be-catise of the lighting there.  The Nazis hammered police wita   

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