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Biloxi Daily Herald Newspaper Archive: June 20, 1832 - Page 1

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   Biloxi Daily Herald (Newspaper) - June 20, 1832, Biloxi, Mississippi                                 8 pages  If yoa do Eot rewire yo« HemH  pleas« pilone b<for« 6:30 p. m. 37—Biloxi . OO-Gcîfport  The  Daily Herald  the voters of gülfport  ReriMerfd 'Kietr Will it titt-Polì» Saturdar-  ASSOCIATED PRESS LEASED WIRE—NEA SERVICE  HERALD BUILDING, BILOXI  MISSISSIPPI COAST, MOMJAT APTERNOON, JUNE 20. 1^2  HERALD BUILDING, GULFPORT  15c A WEEK—VOLUME XXXH'—NUMBER 264  FARMER KILLS CHILDREN AND WIFE^UICIDES  Worry Over Federal Prohibition Charges Blamed For Deaths of Four Children and Their Parents.  Milner, Odom, Ballenger Named Gulfport Officials  Senator Borah Says He Won't Support Hoover  Can ton. Ga.. JiiBf 20.—/;P>—Paul Hardin, ¡¡O-jear-old farmer livinj tea jnilf^ souihwe<<t of here, shot his wife and four small children to death la:<: nisht and committed suicide.  The tra-^pdy was discovered tliis momine by Jehu H«nry Hardiu, fa-liiPr of Paul, who went to his ion's home for a viyit. The elder Hardin found the house locked, and peerin;; ihroush « window, .<aw the bodies in a bedro'-m.  • He notiii'd Canton police, who broke thrcuih a door and remoTed the l)odi?s of the farmer, his 21-year old sir! and their four children. Henrr «, Ruth. 4, Dorothy. 2, and Pearl 1. Al! had been iilain by a pi»tol found n^-ar Hardin's body.  A coroner's .iury returned a verdict that Hardin killed the others and took his own life.  The elder Hardin said he thought his son's mind had been deranged hv broodins nrer hi« arrest last .Tan-iiary on a foderal charge oC violating the prohibition laws. Young H.irdin had been at liberty on $3,000 bond pending trial.  STATE TO SEK AN INJUNCTION  Three-Judge Court to Hear Plpa Against Increased Rat« On Fértil Izer and Fertilizer Materials.  Judge Wayne Borah, and Judge Ru-fus E. Foster, magistrates of the Federal court. New Orleans, arrived in Biloxi this morning to sit this afternoon with Judpe Edwin R. Holmes and preside over an equity cai^e brought by Greek L. Rice, attorney general of the state of Mis.sissippi, against the United State« and the Tnterptate Commerce Commispion rff-pardinj excessive freight rates beinp; charged by railroads in the state of ■Mississippi. The .suit also names the Mobile and Northern Railroad, Illinois Central Railroad. li. & N. Rail-loa«^ Mississippi Central railroad, ;Mobile and Ohio railroads; New Orleans & Northeastiern railroad. St. J.atiis. San Francisco railroad; Southern Kflilrond; Yarao and Missi.«.sippi V.'illey railroad company; Cohimbus and Oreenvillc railway; Batesvile Southwestern rairoad. DeK.ilb and Western liailroad ; Fernwood Columbus and Otilf Railroad company: Kos-ciu!»ko and South i^asteru Railroad company; iMeridian and I'.igbee River Railroad Co.. Mississippi and Skuna Valley Railroad Co.; Mississippi Ex port Railroad Co.. Mississippi SojUh-ern Railmad. Mississippi and Western Railroad. Natchez, Columbia and Jfobile railroad: New Orleans, Natal-bany''and .Natchez Railroad, Sardis and Delta Railroad Co.. Pearl River Valley Railroad Company.  The suit was brought to sot aside an order of the Interstate Commerce Commission, defendant-s. from niakin; effective tariffs and charges according with such orders. The order grew out of a proceeding before the Interstate Commerce Commission. "The (Continued on page two)  AssociAreD PRESScewfirt'i » EVIM«)  ^M. E. i30RAH  Washington, June 20.—(^j—Senator Borah, a powerful supporter of President Hoover in the 3!)2S campaign, announced in the Senate today he will not support Ihe president for re-election i'n ihe i)laiform adopfd at the (.'hicago (.-onventiuu.  First Primary Votes Enougrh to Elect Commissioners ^ And Mayor  LAST RITES FOR VICTIMS  Fred Philips and 4, D. .Alexander, Killed In Grarel Pit, Buried In Wiggins Cemetery.  EIGHTEEN DIE IN WEEK-END  Florida l^adis Southern Stat« With Ftvo Fatalities, Mississippi Second With Fmir.  Atlanta. Ga.. June 20.—i^)—A blistering hot week-end that sent thousands on --iititigs over the south had its aftermath in eighteen reported d-ad of accidents today.  Ilorida led with five fataliti'-s. Mississippi had four, Virginia and Ten-. nes=ee thr^e each and Georgia, South Carolina and Louisiana one each. Automobiles kill-^d nine, a train one. wading a^d diving mishaps five, a 'irain-auton3"bile collision one and i gravel pit slide two.  D-'wey Jlclntosh, 27. Claude iMc-Intosh. 21. and Ivan Rowland, 2«, all of Yancey county. North Carolina, were injured fatitlly when their automobile plunged over a precipice in the e.tvt 'JViuie.ssoe mountains. M. H. Diini-aii, 64. was killed in Atlanta wh-n an aut.nnoiiile. struck by another. luirtled nver the sidewalk and hit hint.  Burrel H:ui'-i'ck. .vouiig fltlilcf?, was killed ar Seiiring. Fla., when he dived inio a lake, struck bottom and broke hi« neck. A cerebral hemorrhage cost ih« life of Henry Peterson, 63-year-old professional diver, as he explored a sunken vessel on the ocean floor off one of the Florida keys.  Aida Roguer. 11. and Astiana Castillo Kidd-Ile. in. waded beyond their depth at Tampa. Fhi.. and were drowntd. Louis L. Collins was killed in an atitomobile-irain collision at Miami. Fla.  Archi.-^ Wliitten. 19. broke his neck .md di''d wh'-n he struik a sandbar ."•s ho divrd iiit ' the Sabine river a' Shr.'v i>ort. I.a. Mrs. (>. J. Ni. hols of .\shevii!e. N. C.. was killed by an au-  :i;iiiiil" at Sjiartanburg, S. C.  An automobile accident near Ocean View. Va.. cost the life of Frank Little Thnrman while Alvin F. Abbott of Norfolk and William Eacho, Jr., of Newp! rt News, were killed in similar mishaps.  Ki^niieth Ivy was killed by a train ar Pbiladeljthi.i. Miss., and a grave! ].!t .-lid.- a: Wiggins. Miss., took the lives of Fred Phillips and J. B. Alexander. Mrs. W., P. Ferguson was killed in an automobile wreck on a curv^ at Hattiesburg.  Wiggins, June 20.—Fred Philips and J. D. Alexander were laid to re.st here yesterday in the town cemetery, following their death' Saturday when a wall of a gravel pit caved in and buried them under tons of debris. The two yotmg men were loading a truck from the pit when it caved in. Fifty tons of gravel and dirt fell on them.  The third man of the party, Bur-bon Hughes, was covered to the shoulders with gravel, leaving only his head out, btit he was not seriously injured. "O'lieii the news of the slide was received here more than fifty men rushed to the scene and worked for more than thirty minutes to dig Httghes out.  Funeral services were held here yesterday morning at 9 o'clock at th.i Fir.it Baptist church with Rev. Ends R. AV. Campbell of the Baptist Church, W. R. Porter of the Methodist and Varnado of the Bethel Baptist church officiating.  Mr. Philip, 22 years old is survived by a wife and his mother, Mrs. John I'hilips. He also leaves t^o brothers. The "family moved here about four years ago from Purvis. Pallbearers were W. R. Hatten, John Howard, S. Smith, J. R. Watts, C. Cttnningham and Carson Bond.  iMr. Ale.vander. 19 years old, leaves a wife after only three month.« of wedlock. He also leaves his mother and father, Mr. and .Mrs. W. O. Alexander; two sisters, Edwina and .Martha Rebecca; also six brothers, Wilfred, Virtus, Gay,oEhvood, Willie Oscar Jr., and John Edward. The pail bearers were Larue Alexander, Levis Alexander, Griffin Alexander, and Hubert .Alexander, Ardell Hall aod Leo Hatten. He had been a life-long resident of Stone county.  The election in Gulfport for mayor •md two commissionerà held Saturday was holly contested, 1662 votes Dut of a po.ssible vote of slightly ovi^.-IT'Kl being cast.  (Jf ihf- four candidates for Mayor Joseph W. .Milner received S40 votes which plai-ed him in nomination in the first primary. He is rounding out an S-year term as Mayor and thi: will place him in the office for another four years term beginning January 1. Other candidates for office received votes as follows; Charles H.aydon, 379; J. B. Howie, «17.,and W..J. Breed, 8:!.  In the coniesr for city commis.sion-ers George Odom, who has served the city as commissioner for a period of over 17 years, and Ivan Ballenger. a new c.sndidate. received the reqnisiie number of votes to nominate them in the first primary. Mr. Odom receiving 07;i votes and Mr. Ballenger 918 voles.  Miss Florence Cassibry, present city commi-sfiioner, received, 681 votes wiih the other candidates for commissioner receiving votes as follows : Paul Evans, 254; W. D. Weaver, 211, and H. C. Gridley, 113 votes.  All of the voting was done at the Gulfiwrt city ball, two boxes being used. C<Jii!itiug' of the ballots progressed frtpidly, (he eniir'' ioiint h.nv-ing been finish- d by 9 ;:'!(» o'clo<-k.  Tlie candid.ite.s nominated will bo voted upon in N' vember. The nomination, however, is practiaclly equivalent to election.  VETERANS TO FIGHT HOOVER ELECTION DAY  Bonus Brigade Makes Overtures to Democratic Party Charging That Republicans Laughed at Them.  HEFLIN CLAI.MS ERROR  Washingion. June 20—W)—Former Senator J. Thomag Heflin said today he had been erroneously ([uoted in an associated press disimtch Saturday as asserting in a AVilkesbarre, Pa., address that under certain conditions he "would even supjiort Al Smith."  "1 wish to say.'' said a statement by Heflin, who was enroute to his Lafayette, Ala., home, "that I made no sttch statement either ptibliciy or privately."  Haydon to Contest Municipal Election  Contesting the municipal election of last Saturday in the Democratic primary, Charles R. Haydon, candidate for mayor, today presented the City Democratic executive committe« his protest of the tabulation of votes, and the committee eet Thursday, June 30. for hearing of evidence.  Haydon, who was ninuer-ttp to Ma.vor .Toheph W.. Milner, incumbent, with 379 vote.s, .set.s out five oounts in his contest presented to the executive committee, protesting the qualifications of voters, claiming that vo-terss residing out of the corporate limits of Gulfport were premitted to cast their ballots, etc.  Haydon's official protest follows in part:  "First—I protest and contest tlie vote of each and every person who had not paid all state, cotiuty and city taxes due by tiiem for the years lO.'^O and 19;il on or before the first day of February, 19;i2. as provided by the coii.^titutioii of the state of Miwis-.siii])i of 1890 and Section 6207 of the Mississippi Code of 19.30, fixing the qualification of voters in the municipal primary elections.  "Second—I do hereby contest and protest the vote of each and every person voting in said election living outside of the corporte limits of the city of Gulfport, Miss., at the time of their registration.  "Third—I do hereby protest and contest the vote of eai-h iuid every person voting in said i)rimary less than 62 years who had not pairl all faxes, including poll tax for the vears 1930 and 1931.  "Fourth—I further prote.st and con-te.st the voting of-certain persons hereinafter named on the ground of frati-dulent registration and misstatement of age; a complete list being handed you herewith.''  Ha.vdon further claims in his protest that he received a majority of the vote of qualified electors of the municipality and that he should be declared the Democratic nominee for the office.  Washington, June 20.——Stripped of an immediate objective by de-fear of the bonus-payment bill, leaders i f the vast veterans army camped here concentrated today on organii-ing ex-service men for election day action making tentative overtures to the Democratic party.  Finding the sixty-two Senators who voted down their bill a rather diffuse target, the legislative committee oi the army aligned iiself against President Hoover and the Republican party.  Last night it voted to query all Democratic presidential possibilities on their views about the bonus and other veterans' questions, at the same time directing letters to all posts of the American Legion and other ex-service men's organizations, informing them ih.it an effort " to place a bonus plank in the Republican platform was laughed down and filed in the waste basket. Think it over, men."  "Remember November,'' was the significant slogan line attached to these letters. Rearing in mind the possibility that neither the Democratic convention nor the nominee ch' Ri'u there might give them an.v Comfort, these ])iditicai steersmen of Ihe ex-soldiers srarted forintilatiuft a "plalforin" of their own.  Still rather nebulous today, the platform had one definite plank; Repeal of the Eighteenth Amendment. Two Ohioans, William S. Keyscr, of Cleveland, and Bernstein, of Dayton, proposed It, and the legislative group, composed of representatives of each major contingent or regiment in the army, approved it without difficulty. The general idea is that, failing Democratic support, the soldier.s should give their vote to some third party movement.  The exact size of the army, somewhere around 20,000, was much in doubt today. Many "'veterans" members were taking French leave, but new contingents were pouring in, and an aggressive recruiting drive aided by the wide-spread word that the army was gathering abundant food, appeared to be bearing some results.  The lack of an immediate objective, however, was helping stir friction in the ranks. A disgruntled former commander, George Alman of Portland, Oregon, was seeking support from the men against his outser from the post nf billeting officer because of a quarrel with police authorities.  Walter W. Waters, the present commander in chief, late la-st night asked police to arrest Richard Lamb. 35. of Dallas, leader of the Texas contingent, saying his status as an ex-service man was questioned. He was held on an "investigation" charge.  Many Killed and Injured in Montreal Ship Blast  COURT HLLED AS MARSHALL CASE^ARTS  Officers of State Bar Association In Gulfport Vigorously Opp«^ Reinstatement of Attorney,  Ten men were killed, sixteen are missing and probably dead, and over forty persons were injured by a series of blasts on the British oil tanker Cymbeline as it lay at dock in Montreal, Canada. Four of the killed were firemen, one of them Raoul Gauthier, director of the Montreal fire department. The above photo rus'hed by plane and telephoto for the Daily Herald by NEA Service, Inc., shows firemen pouring water on the hulk just before the ship sank. In the background is a five million dollar pier in flames. It was completely destroyed.  "Copyright 1932 NEA Service, Inc., Telephoto.  AMELIA BACK AT NEW YORK  .•ivlatrlx Who Flew Aci'obs .Atlantic .Alone Returns E.xactly Month Af-tfr Departure.  TODAY'S  GAME  AMERIC.\N  Washinsion 010  Cleveland .  Crowder Se well  . <MKI and Berg:  Ferrell and  Boston ____ 000  Detroit .... 301  Andrews and Connally ; Whitehill and Ruel.  Durnam pitching for Boston 1st. Hom^r; Gehriiiger, .3rd.  Phihi.Mphia 43 Chicago .... 31  Freitas and Cochrane ; Faber and Grube.  .^mith pitching Piiila. Isr. Krause pitihing Pliila'l'''pliia 2nd. liflclia pitching Chic.iso 2nd.  NATIONAL  Cin'innati . fMH) 20  Boston.....(KW 101 00  Lucas and Lombardi ; Zachary and Spohrer.  Pitt.sburgh 000 000 1 Brooklyn .. 000 100 1  Harris and Grace; Mungo and Lope«.  Lopez homi-rs 4th.  Chicago ____ 001 0  Philadelphia 330 0  Root. Smith 2nd aod Hemrfey ; Holle/ tad V. Davis.  Aged Hattiesburg Minister Expires  ILiiricsburg, June 20.—(/P)—The Rev. L. F. Hall. 85-year-old former pai-tor of the First Baptist Church oL Hattiesburg. died Sunday at his home here. He was a native of Alabama.  Ordained in 1S77. ten years latpr he became pastor of the First Baptist church here which he served for 13 years. Later he became pastor of Fifth Avenue Baptist church here, a branch of the mother church, mother church.  tist church here, a branch of the  He was a confederate veteran. Until a few months ago he was active in church work, jjreaching in various Baptist chtirchcs of south Mississippi. Funeral services will be held tomor-low morning at 10 o'clock. For the first time in local history, a funeral •service will be broadcast. The broadcast will be over station WPFB, local radio station, on a frequency of 1360 kilocycles.  VETERAN FATALLY SHOT  SLEEPING IN BOX CAB  Marion. N. C., June 20— Jjouis Chiai)etta, bonus marcher from Houston, Tex., who was shot in the abdomen as he slept in a box car here Friday en route home from Washington. died early today.  Ho was in the company of seven other veterans after quitting the "bonus army" in the capitol.  W. B. Banks, special detective for the Southern Railway who was named by Chiapetta's comrades a? the man who shot the veteran, was arrested and placed under ^10,000 bond today. He had been held under .$1,000 bond on a charge of assault with a deadly weapon. He refused to make a statement.  Chiapetta's body was held here today pending word from his family.  WILL SENTENCE MISS HARTLEY  Girl Who Confessed to Robberj- of Filling Station and Store to Fare Judge White Tuesday Jlomhif.  New Toik, June 20.—f-^P)—Amelia Earhart Putnam, the first woman to pilot an airplane across the Atlantic, returned home today to receive the plaudits of her fellow countrymen.  A crowd estimated by police at 5,000 was gathered in Battery Park as the flier stepped back onto American soil from the city boat Riverside, which had transferred her and her husband, George Palmer Putnam, from the liner He de France at qtinrantine.  It was just a month ago today that Mrs. Putnam took off on her solo flight which ended in Ireland, where she wag forced down in a pasture by a faulty exhaust manifold which had threatened her plane with fire during almost the whole journey.  Harbor craft saluted the woman flier as the Riverside moved up the bay under escort of fire boats» shooting streams of water into the air.  It was Mrs. Putnam's second experience of a New York welcome. Her first was in 192S after her first ocean flight, as a passenger with two men fliers.  After leaving the Rivrside the woman flier and her husband and official welcoming party entered automobiles and the parade was begun to city hall, where .several thousand persons were already massed in the plaza.  FAVOR STUDY OF we LIFE  Mississippi Conservation Group Advocates Establishment of Natural History Museum.  Additional Taxes Become Effective Tomorrow Morning  Washington, June 20.—(/i»)—Today is the last tax-free day for matches, automobiles, candy, radios, face powder, yachts, ami all the tremendous list of articles brought into the federal government's revenue raising net by the new, emergency tax law.  Anybody who has been waiting to buy, perhaps expecting prices to drop some more, had better do some hurried shopping, for a nice percentage probably will be found added to all price tags on taxed items by tomorrow.  After tonight the movies (except those where you set in for 40 cents or less) will cost more, so will telegrams and long distance calls,'while bank checks will cost two cents apiece.  It will not be necessary however, to stick three-cent stamps onto letters until next month.  BUS TAXK TO BE DISCUSSED  Sheriffs and Deputies Meet at Jackson to Study .Methods of Enforcing New Tax System.  94 VOTES MAY DECIDE ISSUE  New York's .Attitude Toward Demo-rratic Nomination .May Be Decided Factor In Choice of Candidate.  Three Arrested In Prohibition Raids  Prohibition agents working under the direction of L. E. Lester were busy this we<ik-end. seizing a • 1-50-gallon still in the Sellers school section and arre.siing two men. and an-otiier man was arrested in Biloxi on charges of jKissessidU of liqtior.  Saturday morning the agents swooi^e^i down i>n the Hanro'-k county still wherp they arrested .\lb^rt Shaw ?,nd Jra Lizana one and a half miles from the school house. Besides cn-fisi.ating the still the agents also found 1.000 gallons of mash. Each was releas>e<l on .S750 bond following hearing before C-ommissioner Will Elmer.  Last night the agents entered what they termed "bootleg-ers nest" on W«si Division street in Biloxi arresting Johnnie B. (iraham of Biloxi when they found half a basket of pint bottles containing whiskey and jtin. He will be giren « hearing today. I  Circuit court, in recess t<^ay in order that the courtroom at Gulfport might be used for a hearing before Chancellor D. M. Ru.ssell on Carl Marshall's petition for reinstatement as a practising attorney in the courts of Mississippi, will reconvene tomorrow morning with Judge Walter A. White presiding.  Interest centers in the case of Marie .\niionette Hartley, self-c-on-fessed "bandit girl" who pleading guilty last week to charges of robbery of a Gulfport grocery store and a filling station, is scheduled to stand bef'Te the judge to re<'eive sentence.  J. B. Haynie, 1«, charged jointly with the girl in the robbery of the grocery store on a similar plea has already been sentenced to a two-year term in the state penitentiary.  The Hartley girl, who told a Daily Herald reporter last week followinii Haynie's sentence that she did not dread the serving of the sentence the Judge might impose upon her said today through her counsel that the press representative had misunderstood her relative to a reported statement t^t she ■•hoped 'o get as long a term as did Haynie." She explained that she merely e.-c.'iaim'id •'Oh, what if I should set as long a term as did Hayiii'^."  Another case attracting public interest scheduled for trial tomorrow is that of J. S. B.vrd, who with R. A. Murrah and Will Lawrence is charged with arson.  The .scheduled trial Wednesday of Former Governor Lee M. J^ussell; D. B. Alltn and ,1. C. Walker on ch.irge« of receiving deposits in an insolvent bank growing out of the failure of the Bank of Pass Christian, is also expected to attract considerable public interest owing to the prominence of those accused.  The establishment of a state museum of natural history to be maintained in some centrally located place in Mississippi, was recommended by Miss Fannye A. Cook, secretary of the Mississippi Association for Conservation of Wild Life at the open-in© oi the fifth annual convention in Biloxi at the Buena Vista Hotel this morning.  Another recommendation was that the nssociation urge state game and fish commission to furnish lecturers and nature study directors for ser^'ice in Boy and Girl Scout, Girl Reserves and 4-H Club camp work and to have a portable museum for camp instruction prepared.  With a view of ultimately encouraging a course in the study of wildlife as a required living subject in all public school, it was recommended that the association petition the central board of universities and colleges to offer conservation courses in all normal .«ichooks, and make it a required subject of all science graduates.  The establishment of wild life preserves and appointment of a committee to investigate possibilities of securing through donations of virgin timbered area with water to be maintained and an inviolate sanctuary and as camp headquarters for research, was another suggestion. A school or training camp frFr game wardens at the Mississippi State College, was recommended.  BOND PRESIDES  W. F. Bond, state superintendent presided, ilention was made that the Biloxi Game and Fish Association was the first to qualify in the state. Reports of committees were made and Robert Morrow of Jackson, spoke of the work of the joint legislative committee. A motion picture "George S. Fishog'' presented through courtesy of the bureau of fisheries, was an unusual feature. Mr. Bond announced app'^intment of Walker Wood, secretary of state; Dr. Frank Smith, Green-woAfl. Fred Merrill, state forester; Robert Morrow to draft resolutions to be handed the new game and fish association; and of Mrs. W. D. Cook, (Continued on pa«« two)  Notice to Jurors  By Order of Hon W. A. White, Circuit Judge, .¡Vll Jurors summoned to appear before Circuit on Monday June 20th. are hereby notified io appear on Tuesday June 2l8t instead of Monday, June 20th.  a. j. BAMSAT. Clerk.  «d»g 17—%  BY FRANCIS M. STEPHENSON (Associated Press Writer)  Chicago. June 20.—(^Pj—New York with her 94 votes became the sudden focal point of Democratic pre-conven-tion skirmishing here today as leaders of Gov. Roosevelt looked to the Empire state to make a choice for him in the quarrel with Alfred E. Smith.  The Roosevelt captains say the New York decision, expected to be announced soon after the arrival of the delegation heads here Wednesday, will put their man "over the top.  James A. Farley, of New York, head of the newly established Roosevelt camp here, won't comment on the probable decision in his state but he smiles and insists "Roosevelt will win on the first ballot—I mean that."  But there are about as many claims as there are candidacies in Democracy's swiftly gathering convention conflict on this historic battle ground and a lot of milling around is in jiros-pect before the gavel falls next Monday.  The prohibition dispute which divided the recent Republican conclave is losing: the spotli.ght to the presidential race among the Democrats.  Friends of Roosevelt are snapping up the repeal substUute rejected by the Republicans as their banner for the 1932 campaign. This proposes .='ubmission of a repeal amendiiient to the states with control of the liquor traffic to be returned to the states in event of repeal.  In the melee over the presidency, the ancient two-thirds nomination rule of the Democrats is up again for its customary round of speculation. There seem to be well founded reports that some high in the Roosevelt council would eliminate this rule in favor of a majority nomination if their candidate goe.q over the majority line and a deadlock ensues.  But that decision is going to wait the last minute developments on the convention scene here this week—developments particularly in the Neu-York delegation.  John Curry. Tammanv  Jackson, June 20—(JP)—Miss-issippi sheriffs and their deputies converged on the capital today at the call of state Auditor Jos. S. Price to discuss methods of obtaining uniform administration of the new bus and truck tax system which becomes operative July 1.  The new bus and truck law, enacted by the recent legislature, is voluminous and many of'"its sections are highly technical. Price said. These complicated provisions will be explained at today's meeting.  Under the new tax .system, a mile-per-ton tax is levied on all trucks of over two and one-half tons, and on all commercial busses. The tax is scheduled to bring in a minimum of .?.300,000 a year, according to Rep. Horace Stansel, Rulexille, author of this and other highway acts, who is here to explain the new measure to the sheriffs.  In normal times, it was estimated the tax would yield about .$1,000,000 a year, but with economic conditions ¡ibrormal it is estimated the yield will be about half that amount.  New tags will not be reciuired this year for busses and trucks taxed under ihe new law, Stansel said, although the "mileage" tax will be collected. Tho new act provides for a system of Bome 20 different tags, listing the capacity of al! trucks. These will not be ¡•ffe-ctive until next yea- on sale De-lembcr 1, 1932.  In opening his talk to the sheriffs, Stansel read a supreme court decision holding that a "mileage" tax similar to that imposed in Mississippi, was iield constitutional in Kansas.  The meeting originally was sched-liled to be held in a downtown hotel b'lt w.sfc changed to the Chamber of the House of Representatives in the new cap'tol when the hall was filled to overflowing.  SAYS RELIEF IS ESSENTIAL  New Yorker Warns Members That Congress Dare Not .\djoum Without Helping Unemployed.  Washington, June 20—Dr. Sidney E. Goldstein of New York today urged a Senate committee to pass unemployment relief legislation, warning its members that Congress dare not adjourn without meeting this situation.  He told the Senate manufacturers committee that "despair leads quickly to a state of desperation, and outbreak and explosion are nearer than our leaderii realize."  Dr. Goldstein, chairman of the executive committee of the joint committee for unemployment relief said:  "Those of us who are nearer to the working clas:se.s, kwjw that their temper is changing and that they will not suffer much longer without redress. No government can sow injus-chi^ftain;! tice without reaping a revolution-  Hearing on the petition oi Carl Marshall for reinstatement as a practising attorney in the court» of M»-sissippi opened at Gtilfport this? morning before Chancellor D- M. Russell before a crowd that packed to overflowing the spacious courtroom of the Harrison county courthouse.  With Webb W. Venable, president of the State Bar Association, assisted by J. H. Price of Magnolia appearing on behalf of the State Bar organization 'iTliich prosecuicci to a succw»-ful contiusion disbarment i)rorc#di3gs against '»(nrshall in liie State sttpreme court last November, Marshall's petition ie Dt'ing stoutly contested.  ilo.-c than 100 witnesses, all il«-clared to be voluntarily offering their t'\ timon.r fis to Mar>!;x.r? chir-tcter an«', r.,-^ 1 triion and hi» lii'e-s for ■■>. adni'>siun tt tne pracci-se ■ f law were .sworu iu ai the beginn.ui of the hearing, but when informed that they were all character witnesses Chancellor Russell requested Former Lieutenant Governor Bidwell Adam, leader of a group of 63 lawyers appearing as counsel for Marshall, to choose only repre.sentative ones from the long li!< and opi)osing counsel expressed a willingness to agree that others not introduced would testify along the sanje lines.  Only two witnesses. G. P. Bernard, Gulfport locomotive engineer, and R. A. Wallace, Gulfport lawyer, had been introdaced up to the noon recess-  Heated argument between counsel as to the introduction of some 2200 affidavits of prominent citizens throughout^ the state atte.sting to their belief that Marshall "had been sufficiently panished for whatever error he might have done" in connection with the $80,000 Warrenite scandal that led to his disbarment, resulted in the chancellor reserving ruling as to their relevancy. President Venable contended that th-e disbarment of a lawyer was not a penalty, but for the purgation of the profession.  It was "pointed out by the court, however that under the wording of the special legislative Act 2S1 enacted by the state legislature under the provisions of which the Marshall petition for reinstatement was drawn, there was an implication thfjt disbarment was penal in its character.  Marshall's petition is based upon the contention that he has been sufficiently rehabilitated since his disbarment to warrant re-admission to the Bar of the state.  The opponents of the petition main, tain that no repentance or contrition has been shown, that no willingness to even admit that he committeed "blackmail" and gave false testimony as set out in the supreme court order of disbarment, had been shown by Marshall.  Efforts were being made throughout the forenoon hearing to prevent references by witnesses to the supremo court action of disbarment, it being maintained by both Marshall's counsel and Judge Venable that the character and reptitation of Marshall since that time is the only matter into which inquiry is to be made.  Among other Coast lawyen» actively participating in the hearing thi.5 morning were W. L. Guice, Biloxi, J, L. Taylor and R. A. Wallace of Gulfport.  arrives Wednesday. Edward J. Flynn, New York secretary of state, (Continued on page five)  Conner Expects To Appoint Adjutant General This Week  .Tackson. June 20.—(A>)—Gov. Sen-nett Conner today scanned a list of vacancies to be filled by him with, likelihood that several appointments will b» made this week.  Heading the list is the post of adjutant general, made vacant by tJie recent death of Gen. Erie C. Scales. The chief executive said he "was not ready"' to make an announcement regarding the appointment today, but indicated it might be forth-coming tomorrow.  The governor said he was studying appointments for the state charity hospital board at Vicksburg and probably would announce new , members this week. It is the only charity ho.spital for which a new board has not been named.  ^embers of the newly created state barber bcrard also are scheduled to be a^ed during tiie w^k.  "Congress dare not adjourn without meeting this national catastrophe in an adequate and ßtatesmanlike manner. Mr. Hoover and his associates start at the wrong end. What ia needed i.s not an excuse in the credit power of financial agencies that exploit and oppress the people. Instead of credit power in the hands of others, we demand for the working classes immediate relief and employment.  "There is no excuse for the government's policy of delay and evasion. Roads need to be built, public buildings nef^d to be constructed, but most of all th*» cities of .\merica need a housing program .»ubsidized by the fe-ieral government."  A long li.«t of witnesses including representatives of the Catholic, Protestant and Jewish religious faiths,-urged enactment of the Democratic $2.000 000.000 relief bill now before the Senate of the $5.500,000,000 La-Follette public works bond issue bill.  Senators Lafollette. (R., Wig.) and Costigan ÎD-, Colo.) listened clo-sely to the testimony.  Members of the "bonus expeditionary force" of veterans were pre>ient.  There wa.'» applause when Edward  (Coatisu^ «fi tiro).  Deposit Guarantee Bills Will Fail To Pass This Session  Washington, June 20.—I'^P)—The Senate banking committee today decided to turn all bills urging bank deposit guarantees over to a subcommittee of five which concededly kills action at this session.  Included is the Stegall bill approved by the House, and £ measure sponsored by Senator Fletcher (D., Fla.) who moved that the subcommittee ba named to consider them.  Chairman Norbeck of the full committee will appoint the three other members within a short time. He and Fletcher will be members.  Action is considered by leaders to be impossible because of the few remaining days in which Congre.sg is expected to remain in .session.  Eight-Year Trading Record Is Broken  New York. Juno 2t7.—i/P)—Tlie New York .'^tock -Exchange experienced the slimmest volume of busl-nes,s in eight years today.  Total sales aggregated 388,165 share.?, the smalle.-it for a five-hour session since June 2, 1924, when the turnover approximated 310,000 shares.  Despite the reduce<l volume of trading. stock price.s heH well. Prices were irregularly changed at the close with some issues up SI or S2 a share, ^lost leading issues confined their changes to 25 or .'50 cents a share. Gains about equalle,! losse.s.  The previous low record for a full five-hotir session on the Ne^ Yftrk Stork Exchange during the 2l-ypar market was set on Sept. 1, 1931. Turnover wa^ 5;i;>.010 share^.-  The high record for all tinig was 16.410.030 shares, reached Octol>er 29, 1929, when the bull market experienced its most severe collapse.  BANDIT SHOOTS GROCER  Natchez, June 20—Instead of opening the cash drawer of his. grocery 5ti)re on demand of a negro bandit late Saturday night, W. J. Beach reached for a gun. The negro fired i^icting a serious wonod la tiw aeek ol the giwer tad tfeea fled. .   

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