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Biloxi Daily Herald Newspaper Archive: June 18, 1832 - Page 1

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   Biloxi Daily Herald (Newspaper) - June 18, 1832, Biloxi, Mississippi                                 8 pages  If yoa do Bot rtri-iTe yonr Hemld  please phooe beíor® 6:30 p, m. 37—Bibxi 90—Gulfpoït  The  Daily He rald  THB MISSISSIPPI COAST U tbt Best Place is tiie Statt fa* CoaTentions, 8ay The«« Who Attend Them.  ASfîOCIATED PRESS LEASED WIRE—XEA SERVICE  HERALD BUILDING, BILOXI  MISSISSIPPI COAST, SATURDAY AFTERNOON, JUKE 18. 1»32  HERALD BUILDING, GÜLFPOBT  15c A WEEK—VQLUMB XXXIV—NUMBER 2»  BUTLER SEEKS TO REPUDIATE UQUOR PLANK  ing: Chance" if Prohibition Stand Is Changed.  Parrot's Screams Awaken Owner As Home Burns  All^n H. PosMf-thTraite proLabl.T owe» bif ]¡fe to the flutterinj? and scream» of a parrot in a ea?e in ihe home, trhen fire dcstrc'vi'd the place about 2 o'clock this morning. Th»" home is located on Back Bay of Biloxi near the Jafkson Club and is Republican Leader Says believed to hare caught fire from a Tr„.._ . I bot wa;or heater. Tiie loss amounted  Hoover May Have Sport- , build-  ing and contests were desiroved.  Mr. Postlethwaite -was alone in the home at the time of the fire and Tras awak^n^d b.T the parrot, which vras aroused by the smoke and blaze, ■which started in the kitcbcn. The fire Tvas well under way when Mr. Posrleth-waiie was awakened and he ijuickly g;rabbpd a few of his personal belongings. freed the bird and left the home.  Mr. Postlethwaite ic a retired rice buyer and came to the Coast from Louisiana about 10 rears ago, piir-chasicg his prp.«ent home, which was known a« the Old James Monpy place, ilri. Postlethwaite was visiting in \ew Orleans at the time of (he fire. Xeijhbors rendered all assistance pos-sib/e. but conM do lirile except save a few of the outer buildingí. The fire shrcatened the adjacent iishiuj camp of Bab Lyle.  Xp.w York, ,Tiine 18.—f>P)—The York World-Telegram today Fiiife« that Nicholas Murray Butler. v.ho let! tiie iijht for a repeal plank in iho liepuifii-;.u nntional platform, will lead a niovpuient to bring about a rfpijiiintion by Xow England and rnid'lie Atlantic Republican state  nvr-nfiont; of the plank final.'y auojited in Chicago.  If he succeeds, Dr. Butler said, I'rf>ident Hoover may have "a apiirtine chanre'' of election. If he fa^h, he preiJicted, the Republican parfy will ••«o over the dam."  Ar!nr)iion /if the present plank by Uppiiblican n:itional convention, in C'iiicaso was described by Dr. Butler "the mo.it .shocking exhibition of jiatronase control of a convention />ince 1872. when riy.sscg S. Grant won his sccond nomination."  E."MPLOY DELEGATES  "[ was fold." he .«aid, ''tiiat six raiiinet m^nibiTS were at the con-Tcinion, that o7 of the »7 delegates jioni Xew York and i.pward of 4<)0 of the convrntion'g membership were oi'ficf hoider.*-'.  "XiKit ¡R rppuinniit t > Republican tr.Tdii ion«. In 1!:K>4 lioosevelt d-"-cinrrj against the election of federal office holders as delegates. And in VJ2i, in February, ilr. Coolidge gave stern statement to the press cJej,luring tlip pending ot postmasters ami other office holders to the convention which nominated him.  "But this year the po.stmasters were nctually whipped up by the po.=r office department as we saw oy thnt scandalous incident in ilis-sonri."''  lie referred, he said, to an appeal made in behalf of Hoover's candidacy by «n assistant postmaster general si a convention of po.stmasters in Missouri.  NINE ESCAPE INDICTMENTS  Lo>d Daris Charged With Murder and Houston Rubl« With Man slaughter Are Oiren Their Freedom  EARTHQUAKE HITS MEXICO, THR^ DEAD  Terrified Residents Flee Into Parks and Fields and Vivid Flashes of Lightning; Precede Quake.  Overthrown  WRITTEN BY MILLS  Dr Butler said he had been told that the plank regarding prohibition a.s ailopted by the convention was wiitteu by Ogden I^. Mills, secretary of the treasury, Ray Benjamin of San Francisco, E. A- Yan Yalken-burj: of Philadelphia, and Charles F. Srott of lola, Kans.  "Hut erery word wac passed by the Wliite House," ho added.  Dr. Butler said his plank, embodied in the Bingham minority report. would have won had the convention been "let alone."  "We had filU assured voles on ^fonday night," he said. "Estimates that we could muster 700 votes were made. Ill any event, we had a majority. And then the »dmini.?tration (Continued on page eight)  MORE SUPPORT FOR NEW BANK  MiMisflippi Coast Clearing Hoiwe Association Believes I/MjuidaHon Would Piove Disappointing.  Allotlier expression of belief that the opening of the new bank in Gulf-p.-rt under the iiroposal now being .submitled to depos'iior.s offers a more advantageous solution to the financial .situation now jii-evailing than would liquidation w;is given yesterday when 1lll^ Mississippi Coast Clearing House A'-.snciation went on record as favoring the new bank proposal at a meeting held in Biloii.  The definite expre.ssjon as> atitlior-iV.ed by the association and given the lireis for publication reads as follow.«:  It has come to our attention at re'iular session that there has been ■"no adjii-'tnicrit of the banking .situation at Gulfport, and realizing thit sn early solution of the matter i« of great iniportani'e to the interwt of file Missis-iippi Coas(. we feel that an e.xpressioH from tliis organization will be helpful at this time.  are inf<irmed regarding the two courses of procedure open to depo.s-itors, liquidation of the old bank or tiie opening of the new bank under a plan proposed by the Comptroller of the Currency at Washington. From liie best iiifonuation obtainable, the results of lio.uidation hare been di»»-appointing in normal times and ic is natural to presume that they will be less favorable iind<»r present conditions. The pl.Tii drafted by the Comp-troiier of the Currency for the organi ration of the new bank appears to offer a definite concrete program whi' h shoidd protect the interests oi the depositors and promote the welfare of the comimmity.  It is our earnest couviciion that tiie opening of the new bank in Gulf-IH.rt offers the mont advantageous .soiitiion to all concerned. MlSSISSIPn COAST CLEARING -HorS^K ASSOCIATION  Out of a total of 32 cases awaiting grand jury investigaViou last week iu which those charged with crimes were either in jail or under bond awaiting action of the inquisitorial bo<iy, there were only nine in which indictments were not returned during the four days the grand jury was in session it. was .said today.  No indictment was returned in the 8»!e murder charge awaiting action of the grand jury, na-mely that against Lo.vd Davi.s, Bil"xi youth who shot and killed Ira Hosli, his brother-in-law, some months ago. Hosli was killed by Davis, it was said, during on altercation between Hosli and his wife, Davis' sister, and the coroner'.s jury holding the inquest over Hosli's body was reported to have returned a verdict of "justifiable homicide."  A murder charge was filed against Davis, however, and he was held to the grand jury.  Houston Ruble, Gulfport youth, charged with manslaughter in connection with the death of .Io.s. T. Jackson of Biloxi, killed in an automobile collision where Ruble was said to have been the driver of the ear that struck Jackson"« truck, was not indicted,  Xo indictment was returne<l against R. C. Barrett, charged with pofisei-si<pn of stolen property in connection with the alleged theft of some fencing wire and there was no indictment returned agpainst Theodore McMillan and Johnny Gardner, members of a group of Hancock county negroes that had been accused of participating in n series of store burglaries. Five members of this group of colored men yere indicted and four of them have already entered pleas of guilty and been sentenced to terms of imprisonment.  Tliere was no indictment returned, ir was understood, against Dr. C. .7. McEachern of Biloii charged 'with assault and battery, who was also among the list under bond awaiting grand jury investigation.  Loren (^uevas, charged with desi^r-tion, Ira Lizana and Semon Moran, chargai with larceny, and John Dou-lin, Jr.. with false pretense, were among those not indicted.  ABANDON DEBT CHANGE IDEA  Re^KM-t from Reparadons Conference Says United States Will Not Be Asked to Cancel Debt.  Mexico City. June 18—i<P)—At least three persons were killed and many public buildings were damaged today by an eartliquake which shook Colimna. It was the second big quake of the mouth.  Tlie disturbance was felt in many parts of Mexico. Here in Mexico city the populace was terrified and many persons fled t« parks and fields of the suburbs.  Dispatches from Colimua said that three sharp quakes were felt there, A wide area of the state o< Jaliwo also was affected and it was feared that the death toll would mount.  In Mexico City there were yivid sheets of lightning before and after the quake. It was not thought that the damage here wa.s very great, btit it seemed probable that in nearby states the blow may have been heavier.  The epicenter was e.stimated at about 5<X) miles southwest of Mcxico City, probably in the Pacific.  Telephone lines were down betweea Guadalajara and Colimua, giving rise to fears that CoJimna, badly damaged by an earthquake earlier this month, had been struck again, (iuardalayara reported that the shocks were very heavy there.  SHIP REPORTS SHOCK  Col. Marmaduke Grove, a Chilean of Irish descent, was the military leader of the Socialist coup which overthrew the government of President Juan Montero in Cliile. His government lasted only two weeks before he was imprisoned by rebels.  San Francisco, Calif., June 18-  (/P)—The Mackay radio station here reported receipt of a message from the boat Chicken-of-the-Sea saying buildings were knocked over at Manzan-illo, Mexico, by a sharp earthquake early today. The city was in confusion. the captain's radio said.  The ship was forced by port restrictions to close down its wireless before giving details of the reported disaster.  The Chicken-of-the Sea arrived at Manzanillo, on the Pacific coast due west of Mexico City simultaneously with the quake, which the captain said lafc'ted two minutes.  Previously at 3 a. m., the ship felt the lighter disturbance at sea. The crew thought the craft bad grounded or struck a submerged object, but fifty fatlioms of rope was let out without striking bottom. It was not until they arrived at Manzanillo and encountered another shock that they realized what had happened.  MRS. LEWMAN IS PRESIDENT  MfComb Woman Chosen to Head Woman's -AuxHiarj- pf the Spanish War A'eterans for Ensuing Year.  CONSERVATION CONVENTION  Governor Sennett Conner to Be Principal Speaker at Monday Nigftt's Biloxl Convention Session.  Farewell Dinner to Colonel Anderson  A farewell dinner and testimonial ■ixiU be given at Hotel Markham in tJuIfport Monday at 12:15 o'clock in h'uior of Col. W. D. A. Ander-.S 'li. district engineer with headquarters nt M'lbile. who has been active in the inipmvfnieut and maintainant.e of the (;u!ftK,>rt hariior. He has bfen tiaii>!erred 'rom this district to the B.iltiinore disiri,t.4l  The public is incited. There will be a nominal charge per plate. Other en-'ineers to be present will be Edw. H. Dignowit.^. e.\evutive officer, corps rt'gineers. Mobile; W. T. Hannum. c loncl Coast area. New Orleans, and H. I. C^.dlin.s U. S. Engineer'» offic«, Uobìi», ,  T.atvsanne. Switzerland, June 18. (JP) —la quarters close to the big powers ass(iciated in the conference on reparations and war debts." it was said today the European statesmen are preparing a final reparations settlement without an American guarantee of, cancellation or revision of the war debts payments due the United States.  An.v notion of a reiohition proposing to ask the government at Washington to cancel the war debts apparently has been given up as likely to interfere with the presidential election in the United State.«;.  The methcHl under di.^cussion, it was said, is to oancel Germany's unconditional and conditional annuities under the Young plan, to bond the German railways for an undetermined amount and then, without « direct appeal to the United States, to publish l>alance sheets showing Germany unable to pay her debts in the hope that American opinion would draw l«Torable conclusions therefrom.  Governor Sennett Conner will be the principal speaker Monday night at the fifth annual convention of the Jlissiisippi As.sociatiou for the Conservation of Wild ].ife. which opens at the Buena Vista Hotel Monday morning.  A pre-convention field trip for the study of native plant life will be held Sunday afternoon, with car.s leaving he Buena Vista Hotel at 4 o'clock. :\Irs. H. Rollins of Gulfport, i-^ director of the field trip and will be ssisted by Miss Lucy Ewin of GuIl-port. Mrs. R'dlins and ^li.ss Ewin have laid out a trip which will take the visitors to various localities in the neighborhood of Biloxi where thry may view many types of wild plants typical of this section. Ben Arthur Davi.=; oi: Meridian, secretary of the Mi.ssissippi Federation of Garden Clubs; and D. E. Lauderburn, forester for the extension department from Mississippi State College, arp among those who wili be in attendance on the field trip.  Arrangements for the convention are in the hands of Misg Fanny« A. t'ook, Cry.stal Springs, executive see-retar.v to the association, who arrived on the Coast today.  Speakers on the program ^Monday include: W. F. Bond, .Tackson. state superintendent of Jackson: Talbott Denmead, Mr?. W. D. Cook. J. W. Foley Jr.. W. H. Smith. T. T. Quinn. coromissioner of game and fisheries. Montgomery; R. W. Harned. past (Continued on page two)  The third convention of the Mississippi department of the Woman's Auxiliary to the U. S. Spanish American War Veterans, in session since Friday morning at the Hotel Mark-ham, Gulfiwrt. closed its business sc.s-sion at noon today, and will devote the afternoon to a boat ride to the nearby islands, instead of having a beach ride as formerly planned. Tonight, S o'clock, at the Markham roof, the ladies organization will join the veterans for a memorial service, this night meeting terminating the two conventions.  At the closing session officers were elected for the ensuing year as follows : Mrs. O. V. Lewman, McComb, president; Mrs. O. E. Jones, Jackson, senior %-ice-president; Mrs. H. M. Rollins, Gulfport, junior vice-president; Mrs. W. H. YanDusen, Jackson, secretary-treasurer; Mrs. T. X. Moore, Jleridian, patriotic instructor; Mrs. C. A. Xeal, Jackson, historian; Mrs. L. M. Gipson, Biloxi, conductor; Mrs. M. B. Ready, Meridian, assistant conductor; Jlrg. R. E. Cox, Jackson, guard: Mrs. H. 51. Thompson, Jackson, assistant guard; Mrs. E. D. Schlaffer, McComb,. chaplain.  Delegates elected to the national (Continued on page four)  BLAZE HITS NESHOBA mm SEAT  Ffre Bn^neM Firiiis fai Path of Flames at Philadelphia Early Today; Fkr« Fosght Four Honrs.  Some Veterans Leave And Others Remain After Cash Bonus Payment Is Beaten  Philadelphia. Juns 18.—(vf^—Fire of undetermined origin swept through the bu.siness district here early today causing damage estimated at $60,000.  Five business firms, located jnst off th» public square, were in the path of the flames which Mg«d for nearly fonr hours before being brought under control.  A night watchman diseoTwred the blai€ shortly after 3 a.m. and sounded the alarm.  All five hnsinesf Rrms were located in the large Seward building, which was a total loss.  The following firms suffered heavy damages, only partially covered by in--surance: Mississippi Power and Light Company, display and storag« Rooms: Mecca Cafe, Evans Barbershop, Philadelphia Hardware Company and the Wright Undertaking Compan.r.  SPANISH WAR VETS ELECT  M. Trahart Moore ot Meridiaa CWn D^crtmeiit Commander at Nfaitli Aanui EiMonipmeiit.  Nathan Smith Dies While Playing Pool  G. Xathan Smith, about 2T ysars old, was stricken fatally while playing pool in a Gulfport recreation hall tills afternoon. He shimped over on he table and expired before th« ambulance arrived, it was stated. Younu Smith was a boat fireman and spent considerable time on the sea.  He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. C-'iarles P, Smith of 22nd avenue. Bc-ides his parents he is survived by his wife, a two and one-half year old daughter of Mobile, and two sisters. Miss Lelia Smith and Mrs. Hubert Miller, both of Gulfport. The funeral services will be heW Sunday afternoon at an hour to be announced later.  Widow May Succeed Congressman Eslick  Pulaski, Tenn., June 18.—OP)— Mrs. Edward E. Eslick, of Pulaski, widow of the Tennessee congressman who died on the floor of th| House of Representatives in Washington last ' Tuesday, may become Tennessee's first woman to be elected to Congress.  AVilliam Fry, Columbus, Tenn., .it-torney and ex-service man, announced in Columbia last night after a visit to Mrs. Eslick here that she had agreed to seek election as representative from her husband's district io fill his uni-xpired term.  Mi%. Eslick herself said 'T am willing to do anything my husband's friends want me ,to do."  Fry said that a number of ex-service men, friends and relatives had urged her to make the race, and that she had consented.  LEVIATHAN AGROUND  FOR SHORT PERIOD  London, June. 18—(JP)—The United States liner Leviathan was aground for less than three quarters of an hoar today off the Isle of Wight, a message received by Lloyds Agency here said, but she got away again without difficulty or known damage.  The liner ivas reported hoisting the .signal "not under control" at 7:40 a. m., on ihe Dean sand approaches to Spithead. It was dne in nearby Cowes Roads from Bremen this morning to take on passengei'« for N^ew York, brought out by tender from Southampton.  Within Jess than three quarters of an hour, however, another message said, the ship had hauled down its distress signal and proceeded to the roads where, by mid-forenoon, it was diijcharging and receiving passensers.  FIND AMERICAN'S BODY  Shanghai, June 18.—(<?)—The body of John M. Hansen, Brooklyn, N. Y., who was sought by police in connection with the slaying of another American, Rodney K. Heim,,of Portland, Me., early today, -was found tonight in' a rooming house in the French concession. Police said he had committed suicide.  VEGETABLES SHIPPED  Brookhaven, June 17.—^Thirty-one cars of tomatoes, two of cabbage, two of mixed vegetables, thre of potatoes and three of beans, a total of 41 cars have moved from Brookhaven in the past few weeks. Most of the cars were consigned to firms in Philadelphia, Baltimore, Toronto, Ontario, and other Eastern markets.  Statement By Depositors Committee  100 From Beauvoir To Go To Reunion  A party of nearly 100 veterans, vrives. widows and atten'lants from the .Tefferson Davis Soldiers' Home are Iwiving tomorrow morning for Richmond. Va.. to attend the Confederate Reunion. Supt. and Mrs. E. Tartt will be in charge of the party. Mr. Tartt has been taking the veterans to reunions for many years and leaves nothing undone to make their trip.« enjoyable.  They will leave Gulfport tomorrow night, reaching Montgomery at <3 a. m.. etaying there until 11 a. m.. 1 hence going to Atlanta. Daurille and Richmond.  Mr. Tartt is taking along a large quantity of good things to eat. including 200 chickens, ice cream, bananas, oraages, eweet milk and other foods. In Richmond the party will stay at the quarters prcrvided by the reunion nuinagement. Mr. Tartt is mnking arrangements to take the group on to .WsiAiaatoa ffJlaiiB» t^A  Woman Killed On Way Home After Trip to Gulfport  Hattiesburg, June 18.—(JP)—Mis. W. P. Fcrgtison, 71 years old, wife of Dr. AY. P. Ferguson, veterinarian of Grenada, died last midnight of injuries iucnrred when an automobile driven by her husband went off the road near McLaurin. Dr. Ferguson also was severely injured, suffering brnises .tnd cuts.  The couple were homeward bound from the grand lodge meen'ug o' Odd Fellows at Gulfport when Dr. Ferguson lost control of the car while rounding a curve in loose gravel. It hit a stump after leaving the road, ^irs. Ferguson on first examination was fouud to have incurred a broken leg and severe facial cuts and bruises. Later X-ray examination showed her skull fractured. Dr. Ferguson is a member of the state board of veteri-uarv examinTs.  Following is a statement from the Depositors' Committee:  The Depositors' Committee is just in receipt of a telegram from Wa.'^h-iugton, advising that the Comptroller of the Currency has been attending the Xational Republican convention Chicago fotr some dayg past, and that he will not return to Washington until today at which time he expects to take some action on the depositors' petitions which have been transmitted to him some fifteen days ago.  We have received numerous inquiries from depo.sitors asking for information as to what national banks, in the hands of a federal receiver, generally pay, to the depositors and creditors of such banks. We have not been able to answer this que.stion before for lack of exact data. However, we have been able to secure certain reports of the Secretary of the Treasury which gives a great deal of light on this subject. According to these reports, it appears that^ national banks, in the hands of receivers which have closed, and distribution been made to the claimants, between April 14. 1S65. and Oct. li):;i. in the states named below which have been selected at random from the refwrt. h.tve made distribution as follows:  printed on June 18 involving the amounts to be put into the new bank by the depositors on the one side and the stockholders on the other in the event of reorganization, we desire to say that all of the figures contained in said statement were taken verbatim from the federal bank examiners' report now on file with the Comptroller of the Currency. If thes.-figures are not correct step« should be immediately taken to have them changed. The same figures are contained in the report of the Depositors'« Committee made at the last meeting of the depositors. We are always glad to correct anything stated by us if shown to be in error.  If the loans referred to had been secured or if the officers, directors or stockholders or their corporations owing the same, had any considerable amount on deposit, it is not easy to understand how they would ^ve been classified for the most part in the 45 per cent regarded as unsuitable to be a part of the assets of a national bank.  Further with regard to the value of the seeurity to the depositors of the stock liability of the stockholders in the new bank. This cannot be known unless it be given out who the  M. Truhart Moore of Meridian was elected department commander of the United States Spanish War Veterans ct the dose of their ninth annual convention here today and Xatches wa« chosen as the plac« of meet ing. Other officers elected follow:  John L. Heiss, Gulfport, senior vice commander; H. M. Thompson, Jackson, junior vice commander; C. P Milner, Jackson, inspector; John M Mcintosh, Jackson, surgeon, W. H Kier, Corinth, jnd^e advocate; Rev. Pat lather, Kosciusko, chaplain; T. R. Shields, Jackson, historian; T, B. Birdsong, Clarksdale, patriotic in tor.  A memorial for those bavlu« passed away during the year will be held on the roof garden of the Markham hotel at eight o'clock tonight.  The social event of the occasion was the banquet on the roof garden of Hotel Markham last night that -was attended by both the Spanish War Veterans and members of the Auxiliaries.  Captain Tom Gibson of Friars Point, past commander of the state organization,, was toastmaster. Judge Rufus Foster of the federal court in New Orleans was the principal speaker, saying in part that while there was compparatively only a small amount of death and destruction in the Spanish-American War, it ■was one of the most important engagement« ever fought and that it was purely for the purpose of freeing a downtrodden people from oppression. It was noble in its purpose and had reflected its character to the veterans who iwere members of the Spanish War organizations.  The conduct of this war showed Continental Europe that the United States could organize an army and fight when necessary, he said. The standing army in the United States when war was declared w«« less in numbers than the number, of soldiers Spain had in Cuba under General AYeyler, but the American troops were imbued with the spirit that spurred them on to victory.  This 'war settled once and for all the position of the United States on the Monroe Doctrine, he said.  Speaking of pensions, Judg« Foster said that it had been the policy of the United States in all w.irs to pay pensions and the system was all right. Pensions ought to be paid and it would bp all right to pay the bonus demanded at the present time if the country had the money to pay it.  Taxes were tremendously burdensome at the present time, he said. The air we breathe would be taxed, he believed, if air bootlegging could be prevented. •  A number of others made short a-d-dressee, among them being Dr. T. B. Birdsong, Commander 0. V. Lewman C. J. Bolts, Mrs. Emma YanDusen, Captain E. A. Wink. Comrade Ross, T. Moore, H. White, Commander John Heiss of the local post. Miss Caroline Patton. Mb. Tom Gibson. W. H. Kier, St. Clair FaVrot of Ijouisiana and Messrs. Hooper and Jordan.  Many delegates yesterday afternoon were taken on a sight seeing tour in autos along the beach to Waveland, and a number of them extended the ride to Biloxi. Another sight seeing tour east was enjoyed this afternoon and a boat ride to Ship Island was also on the program.  The business of the Encampment today included:  Report of Resolution Committoe; Final Report of Credentials Committee ; Installation of newly Elected Department Officers.  Jlembers of the Boy Scouts who have been on duty constantly since the Encampment began have rendered highly appreciated service.  Leaders Determined To Stay, Request Money And Food  Washington, Jnue IS.—G^l—Discouraged war veterans who came to Washington in hope of receiving cash for their war service certificates straggled homeward today a? their leader« vainly strove to hold their ranks intact.  The Senate's overwhelming defeat of the bonns payment measure by a vote of 62 to 18 last night took its tcfc of the ranks and soon after daylight the roads leading away from Washington were dotted with groups of weary, rain soaked veterans leaving the nation's capital behind them.  Police and leader® of the bonus marchers differed as to the cause of the departures. The former said the veterans were leaving in large groups with their cash payment hopes dashed, btit the veterans' leaders declared that only about 150 had gone home to recruit men for their army.  The veterans' executive committoa issued a statement condemning the Senate's action as prompted by "special interests" and called for recruits to the ranks.  The committee also asked for food and money donations from veterans in all parts of the country to assist in "the determination to remain in the capital."  GRAVE SUBE KILLS TWO IN WWm PIT  Fifty Men Work Thirty Mln-ut^ to Remove Bodies and Free Two Other Workmen from Debris.  SENATE REFISES BONUS  Washington, June 18.—The soldiers' bonus will not be paid this summer.  Definitely, crushingly, the Senate late last night defeated the bill by which thousands Upon thousands o! veterans of the World war had hoped to draw immediately almost two ^nd a half billions in cash from the federal treasury.  The tremendous margin of 62 to 18 was rolled up against the measure despito an amazing day-long seigc (Continued on page four)  Wiggins, .Tune 18—Two workraea were killed near here today when they were buried under a slide in t gravel pit and two others were re.'=uscit«ted when they were dug ont half an hour after the cave-in.  The four were digging out gravel for use on the county roads while another youth, Roy Morse, who was hauling the gravel on his truck had just arrived and loading of tee trtick had started. The cave-in occurred at abotit ten o'clock this morning.  When the four were trapped by th« .slide, a crew, numbering more than fifty volunteer rescuers worked frantically for thirty minutes ro lift the debris from them.  Fred Phillips, 18. and J. B. Alexander, 20 were taken from the pit dead. Their fellow-workers, Mills Bond and Bourbon Htighes, injured, were revived by first aid treatment.  Phillips was» the son of Mrs. John Philli^ps, and .T. D. Alexander the son of Mr. and Mrs. Will Alexander. All of the young men were residents of Wiggins and vicinity.  Mors« rushe<l the news of the tragedy to Wiggins, where numbers of men jumped in cars and sped to the scene of the accident, taking but about thirty minutes to remove the debri.» from the trapped victims.  Both Phillips and Alexander wer* completely covered with tons of gravel and dirt, while Hughes was covered with the exception of his head, and was the first to be taken from the debris.  Notice to Jurors  By Order of Hon W. A. White. Circuit Judge. All Jurors summoned to appear before Circuit on Monday June 20tb. are hereby notified to appear on Tuesday June 21st instead of Monday, June 20th.  A. J. BAJJSAY, Clerk.  *dTS IMt     State    No.    Claim* Proven    Dividends Paid      Aiabnnia ............    _____ 12    $ 1.O10.22.T    $ 630.546      ('a!i'"'>i7)i.'i ...... ...    ____20    7.049.7.^.';    5.414,022      Florida ............    .... 20    7.20;?.64l    5.740.446      Georgia .............    .... 21    3.424.092    2.866,349      Louisiana ..........    .... 8    4.276.035    2.832,536      Massachusetts ......    .... 18    24,099.712    22.672.103      Mississippi .........    _____ ."Í    167,338    118,300      Missoitri ...........    ____ 14    7.349.382    6.741,060      Kentticky ......... .    .... 8    1,108.720    1,084,476          126    .«.'56.67S.880    $47,999,868     It thus appears that the federal re-c- iver iu charge o: 12(> national banks in liquidation bare paid dividends on the ciaim> proved, ii? the siaie named amounting to S4.5 per cent. The report shows that taking in all receiverships in the United States from 1865 ro Oct. 31, 1931, there was paid on the proven claims against said banks. 77.04 per cent.  Referring to the criticism by the Stockholders C.mmittee of the state-Hffiffit  new stockholders will be, and also the amount of sft^ each one will take, and whether tiey will hold their stock for the same length of time the depositors are asked to freeie their deposits : or whether the real owner of the stock would be willing to remain liable in cast it became desirable for him to transfer bis stock.  By order of Depositors Committee this the IS day of June, 1932. J. R »AfJjQWAT^  EYES FOCUSED ON GULFPORT  Hearing on Petition for Reinstate-ment of Carl Marcali Scheduled for Monday.  Eyes of Mississippians Monday will be fwused on Gulfport where a hearing before Chancellor D. M. Russell on a petition for the reinstatement of Carl Marshall as a practising attorney in the courts of the state is scheduled to be held.  Mr. Marshall, resident of Bay St. Louis and former state senator from Hancock county, was recognised as one of the state's most able and eloquent lawyers prior to his disbarment last November by the state supreme court. His disbarment was an outgrowth of the so-called ?SO,000 War-renite '-scandal" wherein Marshall was alleged to have been guilty of unethical conduct.  Although the petition seeking reinstatement is ex-parte and so f^r ^s could be ascertained today is unopposed by the State Bar Association, the orsanization that brought about his disbarment, there is ■ record number of attorneys appearing as counsel of record for the petitioner and if all these actively participate in the hearing as well as some 200 volunteer character witnesses that are said to be ready to testify for Mr. Marshall, the hearing will be a lengthy one.  The petition seeking reinstatement was filed some days ago in Hancock county under provisions of a special Act of the 'recent state legislatur<-relating to reinstatement of disbarred attorneys by means of petition in the chancery court of the district in which they reside.  Although filed in Hancock county, the hiring will b« held io Gixlfport ibr  Five Years Old Damage Suit Tried  The damage suit of John Fayard, Waveland. vs. John R. Perei, New Orleans, the outgrowth of an automobile accident in Bay St. Louis Mar. 13, 1927, is being tried in federal court at Biloxi this morning. The matter was taken up yesterday afternoon and is the last jury case of the term as the jurymen not on the case were dismissed yesterday.  Several matters were disposed of esterday including the suit of T. M. Grantham et al vs. the Mississippi Power Co., which was compromised; Robert X'ecaise vs. Interstate Motor Express Co., outgrowth of an automobile wreck, remanded to circuit court and S. S. Swetman and wife vs. C. F. Tete for damages from overflow of a well on property. Court will remain in session through the middle of next week.  The second «roup of federal prisoners wili be taken to Atlanta tonight by Deputy ilarshal Sardin George. Thirteen are being take to Atlanta this trip and 25 went last Saturday.  HEAVY VOTE AT GULFPORT  Estimated That Between 1600 Md 1700 Will Vote in Today's Pj-imary Election for Mnnicipal Offices.  TODAYS  GAM  NATIONAL LEAGUE  (First game) :  Chicaff.:i .....000 000 200—2 8  Xew York ...200 002 OOx—4 6  Bush, Smith and Hartnett; Bell, Luque (7th) and Hogan. Homer: J. Moore (7th).  (First game) : Cincinnati ...000 110 000—2 11 1  Brooklyn ____012 000 OOx—3 4 0  Frey and Ix)mbardi, Manion ; Thurston and Sukeforth.  (First game) : Pittsburgh ..000 000 000 02—2 8 1  Boston .....000 000 000 00—0 5 2  Swetonic and Grace, Padden (10th) ; Brown and Spohrer, Hargrave (11th).  St. Louis .200 lOO 000 010—4 11 2 Philadel. .200 000 10(1 011—5 11 3 Hallahan and Mancuso, Wilson (Sth); Rhem and Davis, McCurdy (11th).  Homers: Klein (1st); Wilson (llth); Taitt (11th).  (Second game) : Chicago at New York— AVarneke and Hemsley ; Fitasim-mons and Hogan. Homer: Cuyler (1st).  (Second game) :  Cincinnati ........10  Brooklyn .......02  Carroll and Lombardi; Vano« and Picinich.  (Second game; :  Pittsburgh ........OKt  Boston ..........000  Kremer and Grace; Bett« and Spohrer. Homer: Barbee (2nd).  AMERICAN LEAGUE  Boston at Cleveland— .Andrews and Tate; Harder and Myatt.  New York.......20  Chicago ...... ...01  Pipgras and Dickey ; Birry.  Lyon» and  Washington.......  Detroit ..........4  Coffman and Spencer; SorreU and Hayworth. Homer: Reynolds (1st).  When you want to readi the people of the Mississippi Coa4$t try Ma *d in Ha Tln^  Citizens of Gulfport today are casting their ballots in the municipal election in which they are to name a mayor for the eusuinS four years and two city commissioners. -  Up to 1:30 this afternoon there had been a total of 1100 votes cast at the City Hall, the only polling place in the election and those in charge of the election estimated that fully 1600 of the 172CPSa:egister€d qualified electors eligible for participation in the primary would re^ster their ballots.  A large crowd of friends and workers for various candidates milled-about the front of the building throughout the day handin.g out cards and soliciting support for their favorites.  Today's balloting is the first primary in the municipal election and the second primary is scheduled for one week later.  The ticket carries four aspirants for the mayoralty position, namely J. W. Milner, incumbent; Charles Haydon. a former mayor of this city J. Benton Howie and W. J. Breed.  The two city commi.ssioners, Mi.«3 Florence Ca.ssibry and Georse Odom, are seeking reclection and other candidates for the commiss-ioner.^hip are Ivan Ballenger, W. D. AVeaver, H. C. Gridley and Paul Evans.  SEEK LOANS FOR TEACHERS  Melvin Traynor Heads Bank Group Refusing to .Advance Mpnej'—Chicago to Ask Federal .\id.  Chicago. June 18.—(JP)—Mayor Anton Cermak and Illinois representatives in Congress will knock on the doors of the reconstruction Finance Corporation at Washington next Tuesday with a plea to save Chicago teachers froia privation,  A l.a^'t appeal to borrow money from the corporation to purchase ta* warrants of the city and county was made to the loop tankers at a conference in the mayor's office last night. The answer of the bankers, as given by Melvih A. Traylor, was ••no!"  "You can not borrow yourself out of the mess your are in." the internationally known financier told the mayor and other officials and civic leaders. ''You'll hare to pay your way out with taxes. The teachers should direct their efforts to those who refused to pay taxes.''  A taxpayers' strike hag left many millions in taxes unpaid and municipal leaders'declareii there was little hope of bettering the situation in time. They decided to journey to Washington and ask the R. F. C. heads to change the rtlles of the corporation to permit borrowing by mtinicipalities.  The plight of the teachers will be laid before the R. F. C., by 'fayor Cermak himself, spokesmen for teachers. United States S^■nator8 from Illinois—James Hamilton Lewis and Otis F. Glenn—and ot'i:er Illinois leaders in Congress.  Twenty million dollars is due the teachers alone in back pay and a loan of .$25.000,000 will be asked to help pay other employes also.  The mayor's conference was called yestei^ay as a climax to an exciting day for the teachers. Thousands of them paraded through loop streets and staged a big demonstration on the lakefront in protest against HODilWf-jrflfeAi   

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