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Winona Republican Herald: Saturday, April 24, 1954 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - April 24, 1954, Winona, Minnesota                              Cloudy, Cooler Tonight; Sunday Fair, Cool Welcome Exchange Club Members NINETY-EIGHTH YEAR. NO. 131 SIX CENTS PER COPY WINONA, EVENING, APRIL 24, 1954 IIOHTEEN PAOIS Legal Battle Snarls McCarthy Hearing Order for Seizure Of Phone Records Must Be Changed By JACK BELL WASHINGTON Mundt (R-SD) said today the Senate in- vestigating subcommittee may have to rewrite what he called its "fuzzy" order for seizure of records on telephone calls in the Mc- Carthy-Army officials' dispute. With the subcommittee's national televised hearings in recess until Monday, Mundt said in an interview there is some doubt about the legality of making public tran- scripts of monitored conversations without the consent of both parties. "If this matter gets into the TODAY Trends in Early Vote Scrutinized By JOSEPH and STEWART ALSOP WASHINGTON How _ do you recognize a political trend when you see one? This question is raised because the Democrats in Congress are claiming to discern very strong trend in their favor. They say that this trend first be- came visible with the autumn elec- tion upsets in Wisconsin and New Jersey, and that it has steadily gathered momentum ever since. House Minority whip John Mc- Cormack, for example, stoutly maintains that the Democrats to- day could easily win the House by a majority of 40 to 60 seats. There is also increasing talk among the Democrats of capturing the Sen- much more difficult feat. The Republicans, for their part, maintain just as stoutly that .the alleged trend is a figment of the Democratic imagination, heavily tinged with political propaganda. What follows, then, is the evidence which the Democrats advance to support their claim. Whether or courts, we don't want the whole investigation to go down the drain because of a legal he declared. The South Dakota senator is act-1 ing as subcommittee chairman dur- j Court, ing the inquiry. Sen. McCarthy! Smyth Rita Hayworth Denies Child Neglect Charges WHITE 'PLAINS, N.Y. W) Attorneys for Rita Hayworth and her secretary governess, Mrs. Dorothy Chambers, vigorously de- ny charges the actress' two chil- dren were neglected and mistreat- ed. The Westchester County Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Chil- dren Friday charged in Chil- dren's Court that Miss Hayworth's two little Welles, 8, and Yasmin Khan, 4 years old- were being neglected. Miss Hayworth left the girls with Mrs. Chambers during a two- week Florida vacation with her fourth husband, Crooner Dick Haymes. The couple reportedly left Miami by car on Thursday, heading north but unaware then of the Westchester action. The proceedings in Children's with Judge Gordon W. presiding, were behinc President Eisenhower, right, is greeted by former Vice Presi- dent Alben Barkley on his arrival at Lexington, Kentucky's Blue Grass Airport Friday. (UP the regular chairman, has I closed doors, as is customary in stepped off the subcommittee but! such cases. Specific details of th< retains the does the Army j accusations were not disclosed question witnesses, In a stormy session, the subcom- mittee's four Republicans and three Democrats voted yesterday to sub- poena "all memoranda, all docu- ments, all notes of monitored con- versations as between parties in this controversy and all others that are relevant if they are found to be material and relevant to the issues this committee is now considering." The unanimous vote came after McCarthy threw the hearing into an uproar with a charge that the transcribing of a Nov. 7, 1953 tele- phone conversation he had with Secretary of the Army Stevens was 'completely improper indecent and illegal under the laws" because he knew nothing of the action at the Sffvens has charged McCarthy and his chief counsel, Roy M. Cohn, sought special treatment for a drafted former committee aide, G. David Schine. McCarthy has re- plied that Stevens and his aides tried to pressure the subcommittee into dropping its investigation of alleged Communists in the Army. but it was understood that the com plaint originated with a neighbor. The youngsters first were placec under protective court custody but later left in Mrs, Chambers' care pending a hearing next Tuesday. Nonintervention Pact Requested For Indochina NEW DELHI, India an Minister Nehru called on the Unit- ed States, Britain, Russia and Red China today to enter into a pact at Geneva agreeing not to intervene directly or indirectly in Indochina. He made his proposal in a state- ment before the Indian Parlia- ment. It was part of a five point j program for ending the 7-vear In- Both sides have denied the j not this evidence is substantially I others' charges, and the subcom- idoctllna war- valid, the reader may be allowed mittee probe is aimed at getting i Nehru also asked that the big to the bottom of the maze of ac-ipowers "desist from further cusations and.denials, [threats and stepping up the war McCarthy demanded yesterday j give priority at Geneva for i that all records of telephone con- versations be obtained by the com-1 cease-fire' complete in .vme ici-cui mittee. Joseph N. Welch, counsel I dependence for Indochina, and inj. winnp-snta noil showing Sen 'for stevens and other Army offi-jtiate direct negotiations to end the wrTwaf He told the Parliament India welcomed the scheduling of next week's Geneva talks to seek a set- tlement of the Asian conflicts cen- tering in Korea and Indochina. His country, he declared, was inter- ested and concerned" in Indochi- na, and the Indian aim as "to create peace" there, Nehru said he felt "concern and forebodings in references to in- stant and massive retaliation" which have been made since the Big 3 Wind Up Secret Meetings By MAX HARRELSON PARIS Big Three foreign ministers wound up four days of private strategy talks today convinced many obstacles will have to bonfire in its fenced-in yard. There be hurtled before the Geneva Conference gets down to its primary! was no indication exactly when Russia Breaks Off Relations With Australia Charges Aussies With Conducting Slander Drive MOSCOW Soviet Union ias severed its diplomatic rela- :ions with Australia because of iiat country's refusal to hand jack its fugitive envoy in Can- jerra, Vladimir Petrov, as an em- bezzler and swindler. In a note handed Friday to Australian Charge d'Affaires Brian Hill in Moscow, the Rus- sians accused Australia's govern- ment of a "large-scale campaign of slander" in its allegations that Fort ress Climbers Found Frozen to Death On Austrian Peak OBERTRAUN, Austria OR A search party today found the Bodies of 3 German teachers and 8 of 10 teen-age schoolboys who Almost 400 police and mountain guards were mobilized this mom- ing for the most concentrated Al- if documents said to have ex- losed a Communist spy ring. It demanded that Hill, top-rank- ng Australian envoy to the Krem- n, leave with the five-member mbassy staff immediately. Soviet )eputy Foreign Minister Andrei "romyko told Hill the Russians the staff moved out in two r three days. At the same time the Russians ecalled Ambassador Nikolai E. jeneralov from Australia and an- ounced the embassy there would e closed. In Canberra, the big Soviet Em- assy staff was busy today burn- ig documents and books in a huge to judge for himself. Check on Polli First, there are the polls, for whatever they are worth. The Democrats point with pride to the following recent polls: thought to be in danger, with an amazingly comfortable lead over his opponent. A Denver, Colo, poll showing a 27-point drop from last June in those thinking the Administration was doing a "good" job, and an 11-point drop for those thinking the administration was doing a "good" or "fair" job. (But, it should be pointed put, a whopping 82 per cent still think the adminis- tration is doing at least fairly well.) A poll of eight states from the Republican Midwest, by the indus- trious Dr. Gallup, showing th Democrats rapidly closing in o the Republicans. A Texas poll showing a 12 pe cent drop fronr last August in th administration's popularity. Change in Tucson Second, there was the recent vol ing in Tucson, Ariz., Santa Fe, N Mex., and in certain small am medium-sized Massachus ett towns; and the registration in the County of In the last two elections, in 1952 (Continued on 18, Column 1. ALSOPS a Boy, 5, Cuts Rope Strangling Playmate MILWAUKEE old boy climbed a tree Friday and cut the rope that was strangling his eight-year old playmate. Michael Wozniak, who almost hanged himself accidentally, was rushed to County General Hospital in critical condition after police officers administered oxygen at the .scene. Daniel Boileau, 5, said Michael borrowed a jump rope from a girl playing nearby and climbed a tree. At a fork in the tree about seven or eight feet up he looped the rope and tied one end about his neck. Daniel said the next thing he knew Michael was hanging at the end of the ,rope with just his toes touching the ground, Daniel grab- bed Michael's pocket knife and climbed the tree. "I cut the rope in the tree Daniel said. "Then I pulled it away from his neck because he didn't seem to be breathing. He jus! lay there." Another child called his father, who administered artificial respir- ation and notified police. consent, saying "Nothing would de- light the Army more." McCarthy said he would agree only if every transcript were made public, adding that he wasn't going to allow anybody who might not be a principal in the hearing to refuse consent and thus keep a conversation secret. In Milwaukee, where McCarthy Dew after the hearing to make a pair of speeches today, the senator said further that he wants the Army telephone transcripts in the record because, he said, they would show efforts to get his investigators to lay off the Army. May be Violation Ray H. Jenkins, special counsel, told the subcommittee it might be violating the Federal Communica- tions Act if it spread on the record McCarthy in Milwaukee to Deliver Speeches MILWAUKEE ffl_ Sen, McCar- thy (R-Wis) prepared to deliver a couple of speeches today after a quick flight from Washington Fri- day night during a weekend re- cess in his bitter televised fight business of trying to bring peace to Korea and Indochina. U. S. Secretary of State Dulles, i British Foreign Secretary Eden and French Foreign Minister Georges Bidault arranged a final get-together this afternoon to iron out their strategy for the Geneva meeting which opens Monday. Following this meeting, Dulles and Bidault plan to leave for Gen- eva today. Eden was scheduled to fly there tomorrow. A long-distance clash by diplo- matic note between Russia and the West over the role of Red China at the Geneva Conference made t clear this problem in itself would be a major issue to be worked out before the conferees n Switzerland ever would come to he specific questions for which they were convened. Russia formalized her demand hat the Communist Chinese dele- jatipn headed by Premier-Foreign Minister Cbou En-lai be granted he po-sition of a great power. The Big Five promptly said no. Although this is described as nerely a procedural .problem, it has assumed the proportions of a major issue of the conference. The Russians apparently realize Dulles is on a delicate spot be- cause of strong American feeling against any sort of recognition of Red China and because of the growing feeling among other West- ern powers that the United States is attaching too much importance to this issue. For this reason, it is generally believed Russia will not drop the issue simply because formal West- ern notes yesterday rejected its Big Five proposal. French Cling to Main Defenses At Dien Bien Phu with the Army. McCarthy reiterated on his ar- rival here that he is insisting that all monitored Army Department telephone statements connected with the David Schine case be pre- sented as evidence in the hearings presently being conducted by his subcommittee. "We should bring it all in to put ,t back in the correct the senator said. "It will 'Show the efforts to keep us from exposing the covering-up processes of the last 10, 20 and 30 years." The monitored statements will also show, McCarthy said, efforts by the Army to get his subcom- mittee to "lay off" the Army. The Roosevelt Says Spite Behind the Russians would leave Austral- ia. In addition to repeating the So- viet demand for the arrest of Pet- rov on charges of swindling and embezzling Russian embassy funds the note accused the Aus- tralian government of kidnaping Mrs. Petrov, who the Australians say was granted political asylum with her husband. Australia already had rejected the demand for the return of Pet- rov when it was made earlier by Generalov, and kept him in a se- cret biding place. Mrs. Petrov was Calif. James reunited with him after a tumul- j Roosevelt says his estranged wife included the "infidelities letter" with her separate maintenance suit out of spite. The late president's eldest son, a congressional candidate, filed a memorandum in court yesterday that said "inclusion of the letter can only be construed as a delib- erate act designed to cause great By LARRY ALLEN HANOI, Indochina W) The. French hurled powerful counter- attacks today at the Communist-led AVA I.UC X11U3L Al- pine search in Austrian history, i outpost the rebels had The bodies were found frozen to der 18 inches of snow. The reinforced search group suc- ceeded where a smaller group of about 100 men had failed in eight days of combing the snow-covered Dachstein Plateau. The searchers were aided today for the first time by sunny weather and seven train- ed mountain dogs. The dead students and their teachers all were found in the neighborhood of a makeshift camp site, where the group apparently spent one night before they froze to death without food or shelter. with- tuous incident in which she was taken from a plane at Darwin just as she was about to depart with Soviet agents for Moscow. Bidaulf Free To Negotiate at Geneva Conference PARIS French Cabinet today gave Foreign Minister Georges Bidault a free hand to j negotiate for France at the Geneva conference opening Monday. Bidault had demanded that the Cabinet let him go to the Asian ____ ___ parley with no strings attached. I by Roosevelt and dated Feb. 27, senator, who has stepped down as I By giving him a carte blanche 11945. It lists infidelities with nine notoriety and publicity out regard to the harmful effects on the children aad others." The memorandum refers to Mrs. Romelle Roosevelt's answer to her husband's motion to strike the let- ter from the suit. The motion will be argued next Friday in Superior Court. The letter concerned was signed chairman of his subcommittee for the present hearing, insisted Fri- day that all conversations in any way connected with alleged efforts to get special Army favors for The Western stand, hardened by I Pvt. David Schine be presented in the attitude of the United States, I chronological order. is that Red China is no different j McCarthy successfully headei than any of the other several in- terested countries which were in- vited by the Big Four to a con- ference on Korea and Indochina. The United States also insisted Geneva talks were scheduled. "Misgiving had Four invitation make he declared, by the Vietminh step-i n h it plain Red China's attendance in no way implied recognition of the ping up the tempo of the war and the United States a i d i n g the But official said French-Vietnamese side. [yesterday his government will tervention would bar any kind o any conversation where one of the j interference, such as furnishin two persons involved didn't consent I troops and war material. Event to that action. He said committee !uallv il WOUW incorporated in members were taking "the chance i U-N- non-intervention treaty ope: of getting in jail." j to other nations. This squared with the opinion ofi ,France wa? j10' incMed among government attorneys familiar with I those requested to keep hands off the communications law, who ornBut that while monitoring a phone call Parls government should give as itself was not illegal the conversa- tion cannot be lawfully made pub- lic without consent of the party at (Continued on Page 2, Column 6) MCCARTHY The Indian leader's' proposed I Push for agreement on an immedi- four-power agreement for cease-fire in Indochina before the Geneva parley bogs down over whether Communist China is an honorable big power. This feeling is motivated by the strong popular demand in France that the seven-year-war against the Communist-led Vietminh reb- els in be brought to an end. H-Bomb May Change Weather, Jap Claims TOKYO Japanese weather expert said today United States hy- drogen bomb tests in the Bikini area may cause "a big climatic change bringing on an unseason- able cold spell ruinous to crops." The new Japanese blast at the American H-bomb experiments came at a meeting sponsored by the Meteorological Research Insti- tute of the Transportation Mini- stry. WEATHER surances at Geneva that she i taking steps to grant full independ ence to the Indochinese States o Viet Nam, Laos, and Cambodia. India has no direct part in the Geneva Conference. Elmo T, Christiansen, left, North Dakota attorney general, is shown with Herman Paster, St. Paul coin machine dealer, as the two left federal court in Bismarck, N. D., Thursday after a jury found them guilty of conspiracy to bring slot machines into the state in violation of federal law. The two will be sentenced next week. (AP Photo) FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and Vicinity Partly cloudy and cooler tonight, Sunday enerally fair and rather cool. Low tonight 38, high Sunday 54. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 lours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 68; minimum, 42; noon, 60; precipitation, none; sun ets tonight at .sun rises to- morrow at AIRPORT WEATHER (No. Central Observations) Max. temp. 63 at p.m. Fri- Say, min. 58 at a.m. today. Iky overcast at feet, visibility miles, noon temp. 57, wind calm, larometer 29.96 steady, humidity 30 per cent. j off the introduction Friday of conversation between himself am Army Secretary Stevens on Nov 1953. "A lot of important man hour were being lost" by the presen hearing, McCarthy said and ex pressed concern that generals anc senators were being kept awa; from other work. The senator declined to go inte his feelings toward Schine, a form er unpaid consultant for his com mittee whose drafting into the Army and subsequent military ca reer has been the main subject o; the dispute. McCarthy was slated to address the Wisconsin Women's Press Club this afternoon and a meeting 01 the Roundtable International to- night, McCarthy Called Bigger Threat Than Communism NEW YORK Christian Ac- tion, an organization of Protestant church men and women, charged Friday that congressional investi- gations headed by Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy (R-Wis) are "a greater threat to our institutions than do- mestic Communism." The organization said in a, state- ment the "whole trend, of which Sen. McCarthy is partly cause and partly has "undermin- ed the safeguards by which citizens are protected against arbi- trary injury by those in power." This trend, the statement added, "has greatly weakened the party in power as an instrument of gov- ernment, and this has injured the country as a whole." The organization urged "our fel- low Christians everywhere" to "re- sist this evil with the influence at their command before it grows in- to intolerable proportions." Christian Action was founded in 1951 to influence public policy on social, economic and political is- sues. It has members from all ma- or denominations in 42 states and j nine foreign countries and territor- j ei. L on handling negotiations on Indo- china and Korea, the Cabinet head- ed off what might have resulted in a collapse of Premier Joseph Laniel's government. After a 3% hour meeting of the Cabinet, its spokesman, Emile Hughes, banded out a communique saying: "The Cabinet approved the ar- rangements made and the inten- tions outlined by the chief of the French delegation aimed at lead- ing to peace in Indochina in con- formity with the declarations made by the head of the government and sanctioned by Parliament." Laniel has declared in addresses to the Assembly that France will miss no opportunity to reach a peaceful settlement in Indochina so long as the security and inde- pendence of the three Indochinese states associated with France in the French Union are not en- dangered. the heart of Dien Bien Phu. A French Army spokesman said the defenders of the fortress had not .succeeded in dislodging the deeply entrenched rebels from their grip on the whole northern half of the fortress' main airstrip. But he said the counterattack had given the French some added breathing space in which to estab- lish a new defense line of trenches and fortifications. Brig. Gen. Christian de Castries, heroic commander of the bitterly contested fortress, launched his counterassaults in an effort to snatch back the outpost captured Friday by the Vietminh in a day of furious hand-to-hand fighting. Heavy Red Loitei But the Vietminh threw in over- whelming numbers of troops and De Castries was forced to call jack the main body of his forcei to the heart of the fortress. The French claimed the enemy suffered leavy losses in today's fighting. Two Vietminh battalions number- ing about men were said by the French to have been hit se- verely by raking fire from and artillery inside Dien Bien Phu's shrinking perimeter. Meanwhile, there was specula- tion that loyal forces marching northward from the Indochinese Kingdom of Laos may be on their way to try to relieve the pressure against the completely encircled fortress. French-Laotian troops were re- ported to have reached the curve of the Nam Ou river about 18 miles south of beleagured Dien Bien Phu. But the French Army sources here would not disclose the objective of this northward movement from the Laotian royal capital at Luang Prabang. The French counterattack inside the fortress came after the Viet- minh took time out to consolidate their newly won positions in the north corner. Swamp of Red Mud Monsoon rains the past week turned the bowl-shaped Dien Bien Phu battlefield into a swamp of women, with names, places and approximate times. Roosevelt, denying misconduct, has said mud, hampering French war- signed the letter to avert a divorce j planes and bogging down field armament. The French defenses still intact covered an area less than a mile across Friday night. This was a tiny target for planes that must i parachute in all food and war Mrs. Roosevelt's answer to the motion to strike said her husband, if concerned with the welfare of their three children, could have had the file sealed. Roosevelt replied that this could supplies. The plight of the weary if )-inOn Hnna until tf3ftav flofonrln'TC IITO e at _ not have been done until "after nationwide publicity had been giv- en the letter." The memorandum says "attorneys for Mrs. Roosevelt knew beyond doubt that when the complaint was filed it would be available to the general public and the newspapers "It is an outstanding example of a premeditated act." Mrs. Roosevelt, in her separate maintenance suit, accused her hus- band of adultery with three other women not named in the 1945 letter. defenders was considered especial- ly acute because all escape routes from the remote mountain position have been blocked by the encircling Vietminh masses. The first of a new contingent of paratrooper reinforcements from France arrived at a secret Viet Nam air base Friday. U.S. Air Force Globemasters ferried the troops on a three-day, flight which skirted India. The French News Agency said in a dispatch from Saigon more landed in Indochina today. The Facilities of a French field hospital at Dien Bien Phu, Indochina, are heavily overtaxed since planes can no longer land to evacuate the wounded. Waves of Red rebels hit the crumbling defenses of the city today in attempt to reduce French-held territory so that parachuting of re- inforcements would become impossible. (UP Tele- photo) t   

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