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Winona Republican Herald: Friday, April 23, 1954 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - April 23, 1954, Winona, Minnesota                              Occasional Rain Tonight and Saturday Orphan Annie Starts Today On Back Page NINETY-EIGHTH YEAR. NO. 130 SIX CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY EVENING, APRIL 23, 1954 TWENTY PAGES Although Ht Probably Isn't, Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy appears to be bored as he yawns in this candid photo made during the second day of the McCarthy-Army hearing before the Senate In- vestigating Subcommittee. (UP Telephoto) Cooperative Peace Proposed by Ike By JAMES DEVLIN NEW YORK Presides Eisenhower likens Communisi aims to those of Adolf Hitler and counsels the free world to build a cooperative peace to avert Red domination. "Aggression is still a terrible he said last night at a dinner of the American Newspaper Publishers Assn.'s Bureau of Ad- vertising. "Either the nations will build a cooperative peace or, one by one, they will be forced to accept an Imposed peace, now sought by the TODAY How Sen. McCarthy Operates Jy JOSEPH and STEWART AUSOP Joseph R. McCarthy made public his charges against Assistant Secretary of De- fense H. Struve Hensel only after threats to "expose" Hensel had failed of their desired effect. The desired effect was to frighten Hen- to that it gives to the things that sel and Sec. of Defense Charles E. j divide them." Wilson into making a deal with j "if proposed laws and policies McCarthy. I are described as mere battle- McCarthy and his hangers-on be-1 grounds on which individuals or gan to make desperate attempts to parties seeking political power head off the'McCarthy-Army jnves-I suffer defeat or achieve victory, tigation as soon as the first Army report on the McCarthy-Conn Communist powers, as it was by Hitler." The President, sun-tanned from his Georgia vacation and dressed in formal evening clothes, de- clared: "If this is -qot to be an age of atomic hysteria and horror, we must make it the age of inter- national understanding and coop- erative peace. "Even the most rabid Marxist, the most ruthless worshipper of force, will in moments of sanity admit that." An unprecedented police guard was posted for the President, argely because attacks on Ameri- can public officials by Puerto lican Nationalist fanatics have jeen plotted in New York. One thousand policemen lined the President's route between La Guardia Airport and the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, where he spoke. Approximately 250 policemen were stationed in and around the grand ballroom during his address. The President disavowed any in- tention of telling the publishers "how to run your business" but suggested the press could do more to promote domestic unity and international understanding. More than publishers, ad- vertising men and guests applaud- ed when he said, "The press should give emphasis to the things that unite the American people equal Monitored McCarthy Call of Senator rouses Sec. Of The Army Robert Stevens, right, is shown as he arrived at the Senate caucus room today to take the stand for questioning before the Senate Investigating Subcommittee on the second day of the McCarthy-Army dispute hearing. On the left is Gen. Robert Young, Asst. Chief of Staff for Personnel. (UP Telephoto) Roy Cohn, right, used both hands to cover up his microphone and Sen. Mc- Carthy's as the two conferred together today while Army Secretary Stevens wis testifying before the Senate Investigating Subcommittee. (UP Telephoto) Pvt. David Schine, central figure in the dispute between the Army officials and Sen. Joseph McCarthy, had nothing to say to reporters upon his arrival in Washington. Schine was expected to testify at the hearing today. (UP Telephoto) Adm. Carney Urges Full Preparedness CHICAGO Adm. Robert B. Carney said today America's strategy must be flexible enough to meet all possible he mentioned as an example a rift between Russia and her Chinese satellite. Carney, Navy member of the strategy-making Joint Chiefs of Staff, did not predict this would happen; he posed it only as an example of how national plans and policies must be patterned to a U. French Troops Reach Indochina By JOHN RODERICK SAIGON, Indochina (ffi Ameri- can-airlifted paratroopers from France began pouring into Indo- china today as the desperate French defenders of Dien Bien Phu battled new Vietminh attacks on their hard-hit northwest defenses. The first of a fleet of huge U. S. Ah- Force C124 Globemasters touched down briefly in Saigon to- day with 220 beret-wearing French jump-troops who were rushed out of Peris' Orly Field Tuesday. The total number being ferried out by the American Air Force in the hurry-up move to save Dien Bien Phu was a military secret, j Advices from Paris said the Amer- 13 Minnesota indiviauals and firms j the strategic implications if one Scans possibly would airlift who have been placed on a Federal j day Red China's Mao Tse-tung 13 State Firms, Individuals on FHA Blacklist MINNEAPOLIS (fl Names of variety of possibilities. Strategy, said Carney in an ad- dress prepared for the Executives Club of Chicago, "is not a static thing; it is an accommodation to circumstances and circumstances are never static The wise planner will review his basic as- sumptions often and carefully." No Wishfui Thinking Then the admiral said: "Can you imagine, for instance then indeed is the American sys- tem distorted for us and for the he said. Without referring to current hearings on the dispute between Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy (R-Wis) and the Army, Eisenhower said: "If the day comes when personal both McCarthy counsels Roy Cohn conflicts are more significant than and Army counsel John Adams j honest debate on great policy, then Schine mess was published. These attempts have taken the form of amicable hints coupled with not very veiled threats. Suggestions have cotr.e from the McCarthy side, for example, that hange in Draft, Training Laws May Be Asked troops in 10 planes. Detour Around India En route they were forced i Housing Administration "precau-I .should disassociate himself from to detour from the direct Europe-to- Asia commercial route to refuel at the British base at Colombo, Ceylon. India's Prime Minister Nehru announced that his govern- ment would permit no foreign troops to cross Indian territory, by air or by any other route. tionary" list for government-in- sured home repair loans were made public here today. The list was released by Wallace Berg, Minnesota FHA director, aft- er a national list had been placed on record before the Senate Bank- ing Committee, probing FHA mat- ters, in Washington. (In placing the list on record, three of the giant, troop-packed Globemasters landed there yester- day and two more came in today. Bai jkok, the capital of Thailand, was their next stop before Saigon. WASHINGTON top Penta-1 Two hundred and twenty jump- gon official said Thursday the De-1 troops, wearing 'their character- Dispatches from Colombo said Senator Capehart (R-Ind) describ- the Kremlin? A clean break be- tween Peiping and Moscow obvious- ly would have profound impact on the grand strategy not only of the United States and her allies but on the strategy of the Soviet Union. "We should never be beguiled into wishful thinking, but it is pleasant to contemplate that dicta- tors are suspicious critters subject to hates, passions, and prejudices, Western Big 3 Plans Moves at Geneva Parley PARIS in Western Big Three gave their North Atlantic partners a confidential preview to- day of their plans for the Geneva conference and the difficulties they anticipate with the Communists there. After brief warning remarks from Lord Ismay, their British sec- retary general, the 14-nation NATO Council of Ministers closed their 1 doors on outsiders to hear from U. S. Secretary of State Dulles, British Foreign Secretary Eden and France's Foreign Minister Geo_rges Bidault. With military plans for the year decided last December, the NATO foreign ministers attention fo- cused today entirely on world poli- tical problems particularly the Korea and Indochina questions to be discussed with Russia and Com- munist China at the Geneva meet- ing beginning Monday. ___ _____ ___ ______ Before they went into secret ses-1 senator to state it without em- sion, the ministers were welcomed I bellishment. by Bidault and beard from Lord! "This is completely Ismay that Western Europe still j monitor a conversation without faces a military threat and the I telling the person on the other end "Soviets will continue to do their I that you are doing McCarthy Solon Admitted Trouble With CohnOverSchine Calls Recording 'Indecent And Illegal' WASHINGTON GB-Sen. McCar- thy (R-Wis) threw the Senate Investigations Subcommittee into an uproar today by denouncing as "indecent and illegal" the action of Secretary Stevens in monitoring a phone conversation with him. Testifying in the second day of hearings into his controversy with McCarthy, the Army secretary started to detail z telephone con- versation he said >ie had with the Wisconsin senator last Nov. 7. Chairman Mundt (R-SD) ruled, after a verbal battle, that an Army employe identified only as Lucas n the testimony must come before the committee and swear that he made a transcription of the phone call. Before McCarthy exploded into action, Stevens had told the com- mittee that McCarthy said to him on the phone that "one of the few hings he had trouble" about with rloy M. Conn, McCarthy's chief counsel, was G. David Schine. Stevens had charged that Mo arthy and Conn sought by "im- jroper means to get special treat> nent for Schine, a former commit- :ee consultant later inducted into the Army. McCarthy has denied anything improper. Ought to Central Stevens quoted McCarthy as tell- ing him in the phone call: "Roy thinks Dave ought to be a general and operate from a pent- house on the top of the Waldorf- Astoria." Stevens said that McCarthy "thought that few weekends off for David Schine might be ar- ranged, perhaps for taking care of Schine's girl friends." When Ray Jenkins, committee counsel, asked if the transcript of the conversation were available, McCarthy erupted with a point of order. "This is one of the most indecent, dishonest things I have ever heard of McCarthy began. Jenkins started yelling at the same time that McCarthy was not making a point of order and Chair- man Muniit told the Wisconsin utmost to divide us." Ismay said NATO has said, made I "It is completely improper, in- should be fire, and the whole mat ter then dropped, with polite re- tractions from both sides. There have been other proposals for a deal, whicli was first made some weeks ago, at a carefully pre-ar- ranged dinner party. No Response McCarthy, a leading supporter, the Hearst executive Richard Ber- lin, and Brig. Gen. A. J. Drexel Biddle were brought together at this dinner party, as previously the flame of freedom will flicker low indeed." The President said there were many misconceptions, fanned by Communist propaganda, between Americans and citizens of other countries. He said some "foreign friends" regard American civilization as "a collection of shiny gadgets" and Americans so immature in world politics as to be ready to provoke war recklessly and needlessly. reported in this space. Gen. Bid-1 "it is even worse to learn that die, who is Army Chief of Staff j we are Often judged as power- Mathew Ridgway's aide, failed hungry as the men in the Krem- he said. But he declared: "We know that we seek only peace, by cooperation among equals. Success in this great pur- pose requires that others likewise know this." WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and Vicinity Mostly cloudy, occasional rain tonight and Saturday. Somewhat warmer to- night, moderate temperature Sat- urday. Low tonight 45, high Sat- urday 65. to respond to the numerous hints about a deal from Berlin and Mc- Carthy. The hints were then fol- lowed by much head-shaking about McCarthy's unfortunate duty to ex- pose Struve Hensel. Both the hints and the head- shaking came to nothing. Apparent- ly Biddle did not even report back the substance of the conversation to Ridgway or Army Secretary Stevens, as he was of course meant to do. More direct methods were then decided upon. Postmaster General Arthur Sum- only man in the cab- inet, still close to selected by the McCarthy forces for this more direct approach. In the last week in March, Summer- field was by Mc- Carthy himself or one of his hench- men is not McCarthy had a secret weapon in the form of explosive charges against Hensel. Wilson Troubled McCarthy was reluctant to use this secret weapon, it was inti- it would be far bet- ter, in the interests of party har- mony, to have a private, friendly settlement of the McCarthy-Army (Continued on Page 7, Column 1) ALSOPS fense Department may ask Con- gress soon for a drastic revision of present draft and reserve training laws, Asst. Secretary of Defense Han- nah told the Senate Armed Serv- ices Committee the new program will inclvde: 1. A requirement that thousands of youths within the 18-26 age draft bracket take only six months of istic berets, were aboard the first Globemaster landed there Thurs- day and two more came in today. The airlift leader stopped only briefly in Saigon. It later roared off towards an undisclosed airfield outside the combat area to deposit its burden of fighting men. Planes manned by pilots from the French air force or American civilians will drop them into Dien Bien Phu. ed it as a list of hundreds of j and not without personal ambitions, j great strides since its creation five j decent and illegal under the law." individuals and firms to whom j History reveals that the personal (years ago but added: lending institutions were advised j relationship between Hitler and "The threat remains and it would not to extend government-insured Mussolini left much to be desired home repair loans without special j and the personal ambitions of one "precautions." (Capehart called it a "blacklist" of firms which he said had cheated homeowners by padding casts and performing inferior work in return for money borrowed under govern- ment insurance programs. (Sen. Lehman (D-Lib-NY) pro- tested use of the world and said those listed were "large- ly a number of little fellows" whose reputations should be handled with leagured French fortress in north- west Indochina where the Commu- nist-led Vjetminb are going all out for a major victory to influence the impending Geneva conference on Far Eastern affairs. Heavy Fighting There today the rebel troops smashed again into the northwest defenses of the shrinking French Union fortress and a French com LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 63; minimum, 37; noon, 63; precipitation, none; sun sets tonight at sun rises to- morrow at 5-10 AIRPORT WEATHER (No. Central Observations) Max. temp. 57 at noon today. Low 42 at a. m. today. Other noon readings scattered layer of clouds at feet, visibility 15 miles, wind from the east at 12-miles-per-hour, barometer at 30.19 falling, humidity 56 per cent. active duty, and then be required I The reinforcements were sorely to attend regular drills and active training under reserve units, eluding the National Guard. 2. A requirement that men com- pleting two years or more active service continue to attend regular National Guard training for most of the eight years of service now obligated but not entorced. 3. A new set of limits on the size of both regular and reserve forces of all services, to be determined by the Joint Chiefs of Staff. No Action Planned By U on Teachers Called Communists MINNEAPOLIS w No action will be taken in the case of two University of Minnesota teaching assistants accused in January of having been members of the Com- munist party. Those placed on the FHA list from Minnesota, together with the be a mockery of all the exertions and sacrifices that have been made apart." did not always contribute to the if we were now to be complacent best interests of the other. Or to relax, or, worse still, to faU "One day this might bring satel- lite leaders to conclude that a part of Russian strategy is to trade un- limited advice and limited arma- ments for a war by proxy. Not bad trading, one would say, for the So- viet Union, Soviet Strategy "The subject of Soviet strategy brings to mind another thought which has occurred and reoccurred McCarthy .said if the transcrip- tion were put into the record verbatim and was not merely a compilation of notes taken by someone who was listening in, he would not object to its being put in the record. The rest of today's session was j set aside for a statement by each! foreign minister of his views on the ___. ____________ ._ pressing problems facing the cessed until p.m. with the un- 'derstanding that Lucas, the man Mundt upheld this point. To Call Expert In the upshot, the committee re- to me many the Navy chief j Washington. alliance. Some of the smaller-power min- isters already have been brought up to date on the Big Three dis- cussions under way since Dulles arrived here Wednesday from continued. The NATO gathering die! not halt David Robert and Louis Abra- hamson, Minneapolis and St. Paul, Nov. 17, 1941. John Brogan, Rochester, May 31, 1950. Paul Brown, Minneapolis, May 7, 1952. Joseph T. Burke, St. Paul, Aug. 7, 1945. Capital Insulating Co., Rochester, munique said fierce hand-to-hand 1 T fighting was in progress c L; Fassett Jr., Minneapolis, i The brief French communique Seg.t- 12< did not indicate whether the con-' Harold Fenr tinuing see-saw battle for the northwest defenses was the start of the anticipated third mass try at overrunning the batterej French defenses on the encircled plain. The Vietminh were driven out of some forward points in the north- west corner Thursday by fierce counterattacks. The French claimed, the enemy suffered "heavy losses." Dr. James L. Morrill, university But the rebels came back early president, said the two, Jules i today with renewed attacks at this Harold Fenner, Mankato and Du- luth, Nov. 27, 1942. "When people suffer from op-1 the work of the Big Three ministers pression and privation and finally I on their strategy planning for reach a point of desperation in their need for improving their cir- cumstances, they inevitably come to one conclusion: Revolution. "Today there are literally hun- dreds of' millions of people whose plight is .desperate, who desperate- ly need and seek betterment of their conditions; they are listening attentively to the offers being made Geneva. They met for two hours Thurs- reported to have made the tran- script of the conversation, would be called then to testify a.s to whether it was full and complete. Stevens had been questioned only by Jenkins up to this point. The committee routine is for the coun- sel to ask the first questions. Then the senators.take 10-minute turns. Jenkin.s began with the day last February when Stevens took of- day but still had many points to fjce and went step by step through agree on finally, informed sources j his first meeting with McCarthy said. I and their later relations. to them for all sides We are offering them the beauties of free- dom and democracy; Communism is offering them stark, unvar- olution." Chametzky and Eugene Bluestein, had submitted sworn statements denying the charges. Mrs. Barbara Roehric'h, Minne- apolis, accused the two English department assistants when she appeared in Washington before the subversive activities control board. sector, trying for a breakthrough Joe Goldman, Minneapolis, May I nished, and understandable rev- 7, 1952. Herman B. Haas, Worthington, April 29, 1952. W. A. Mason, Minneapolis, Sept. 12, 1944. Fred W. Roedter, Duluth, June 17, 1946. Spencer Furnace, Inc., Worthing- ton, April 29, 1952. Non-Farm Employment Drops in March to the heart and nerve center ofj ST. PAUL Minnesota had the fortress' shrinking perimeter. Already, by a series of night assaults and furious digging and thrusting, the Vietminh had man- aged to draw their steel ring tighter around the fortress. They She admitted she had "been a have cut its girth from a broad former member of the Communist 16-by-4-mile area to one not more party. i than a mile and a quarter across. non-agricultural workers on the job in March, a drop of from February, the State Depart- ment of Employment Security re- ported today. Main cause for the reduction was shutting down of ordnance making, a result of the halt of the Korean War, the department said. A Bad Knee Acquits Accused Burglar NEW HAVEN, Conn. Superior Court jury acquitted Char- 1 Hospitalized with a skull fracture les Starr, 32, of a burglar charge i and other injuries was Mrs. Nora The trio Dulles, Eden and j For the most part, his' testimony Bidault-scheduled another meet- was a repetition of what he had ing Saturday afternoon before leav- ing for the Swiss city. Suitor Beats Widow, Commits Suicide MINNEAPOLIS A 43-year- old widow was in critical condition today after a severe beating police said was administered Thursday by a department store shoe sales- man who later leaped to his death from a Mississippi River bridge. yesterday because he couldn't run. Starr was accused of breaking into a diner here last Dec. 21 after the proprietors, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Chappell, identified him as the man they saw in their place. They said, however, they couldn't catch him because he ran so fast. But Starr displayed an ailing knee which he said had been ailing him long before the burglary. To prove the point, he got up and shuffled around the courtroom, go- ing no faster than a hurried walk. Breault, 43, who was found in her blood-splattered living room. Shortly afterward Myron Blum- enstein, 50, jumped to his death from the Lake Street bridge. His body was recovered, Det. Capt. Clarence McLaskey said Blumenstein and Mrs Breault had been keeping company. A .32 caliber pistol and a blood- covered piece of metal were found in Mrs. Breault's apartment. Po- lice were called after Mrs. Breault managed to telephone a neighbor. said in a formal statement Thurs- day. He related that McCarthy pro- posed to him last September, when Schine was about to be drafted, that Schine be given a special as- signment to dig out Communists in the Army. Stevens said McCarthy said be thought Schine should be made a special assistant to the secretary, or a special assistant in Army In- telligence. This proposition, Stevens said, was made to him in the Waldorf Towers apartment of Schine's wealthy parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Myer Schine. He said McCarthy invited him to the apartment. The secretary also told the sub- committee that young 27 and a private in the Army- told him last October that he (Stevens) was doing "a good job in ferreting out Communists" in the Army, Stevens testified at the outset today that one of his first official acts as secretary was to order a checkup on security and loyalty procedures.   

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