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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: April 22, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - April 22, 1954, Winona, Minnesota                              Fair, Cooler Tonight; Friday Cloudy, Warmer Orphan Annie Starts Friday On Back Page NINETY-EIGHTH YEAR. NO. 129 SIX CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY EVENING, APRIL 22, 1954 TWENTY-FOUR PAGES McCarthy, Cohn 'Pressured' Him Reber Testifies Secretary Of The Army Robert T. Stevens, left, smiles at some- thing being whispered in his ear by John G. Adams, counselor of the Department of the Army, while on the right Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy engages in a whispered conversation of his own with Roy M. Cohn, chief counsel of the Investigations Sub- committee. Seated alongside Stevens is Maj. Gen. Robert N, Young, Asst. Chief of Staff for Personnel. The photo'was made just as the hearing got under way today. (UP felephoto) This Was The Scene in the caucus room of the Senate Office building in Washington today as the Senate Investigating Sub- committee began hearings into the McCarthy-Army dispute. Left to right at the committee table are: Sen. Dirksen; Ray Jenkins, Western Big Three Foreign Ministers Map Geneva Plans By MAX HARRELSON PARIS The foreign ministers of the Western Big Three con- tinued meetings here today to put their plans for the Geneva confer- French Foreign Minister Georges Bidault got together last night, problems which will come U.S. Air Lift To Indochina Not Crossing India Pine Island Youth Given 5 to 40 Years ROCHESTER, Minn, ffi dap- per young Pine Island, Minn., man and his bride of seven weeks wept in court here today when he was sentenced to 5 to 40 years in Still- water Prison. Sentenced was Joe Bassett, 21, I who had admitted the holdup-shoot- Monday. linS early last Thursday of Darrell British Foreign Secretary Eden j Hall, 23, also of Pine Island. Bas- i was due to join Dulles and Bidault pleaded guilty to a first degree for a session at the French For- robi3ery charge in Olmsted District eign Office immediately after his Wednesday. arrival bv plane from London to- vv v Assault charges, which author- ities said would carry a lesser penalty, were not filed against day. Earlier today, the diplomatic chiefs were closeted with their top advisers, working out the detailed strategy for the coming talks on A I Korea and Indochina. All talks here are being carried Bassett. When Judge Arnold W. Hatfield asked the weeping bridegroom why WIESBADEN, Germany i.T) U.S. Air Force spokesman con- j All talKs nere are oemg carneu d R u B tnrtav that the American on in strictest secrecy in hope the i ne nafl snot roonea nan, frnned today that the American slrategy decisions wiu not leak out j sett muttered "I was a little foggy before they are unveiled in Gen- j just then." eva. 1 Bassett's bride, the former Bar- The only thing that has been bara Sanborn of Cresco, Iowa, ar airlift of French troops to Indo china is not crossing India. But the Air Force still refused to di- vulge the route of the giant C124 Globemasters on grounds that such VylUUCllleI5i.ti3 uu _ Tr information might endanger the they are ea both Korea disclosed officially about the Big Three meetings in Paris is that success of the operation. up a Western reply to -i- u u lA J- v" Indian Prime Minister Nehru Russia's note March 31 offering told his Parliament in New Delhi i to join the North Atlantic Treaty today that his government would not let the troop-carrying U.S. planes fly across India, the nor- mal route for aircraft bound from v was expected to be approved in time to be laid before the NATO Council meeting Friday, at which rived here Wednesday with her father. Authorities said Bassett could be released in less than five years on good behavior. Hall, who had been hospitalized here since the shooting, returned to his home with a bullet still in his chest. Hall changed his earlier account of the incident by telling author- ities Wednesday that he knew special counsel; Acting Chairman Karl E. Mundt; Sen. McClellan; Sen. Symington; Sen. Jackson; unidentified general; Army Sec. Robert Stevens; Maj. Gen. Robert N. Young; Roy Cohn, hand to face; Sen. McCarthy, and Francis P. Carr. (UP Telephoto) Says Youth Lacked Qualifications to Become an Officer By G. MILTON KELLY WASHINGTON Gen. Miles Reber testified today that Sen. McCarthy and Roy Cohn repeatedly pressed him for an officer's commission for G. David Schine, committee consult- ant eventually drafted into the Army as a private. The bearing was recessed at p.m. (CST) today until p.m. During the period from July 17 to July 31 of last year, Reber said, he received an average of about two telephone calls a day from. Cohn, chief counsel to McCarthy, regarding Schine. Reber-said there also were "two or three calls" from McCarthy, and that earlier the senator had called him to his McCarthy could bring it up again later if he chose. Appearing in uniform, Reber" testified under protest from Mc- There Was Early Activity in the caucus room of the Senate Office building today as prepara- tions were made for the opening of the Senate Investigating Subcommittee's hearing into the Mc- Carthy-Army dispute. (UP Telephoto) nist questioners, is "not to allow I any foreign troops to pass through or'over India, by air or any other mesns." He said no action was necessary by the Indian government since "the Globemasters are not flying over India now." WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and Vicinity Fair and cooler tonight. Friday increasing cloudinesf and a little warmer. Low tonight 37, high Friday 64. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 j hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 63: minimum, 36: J> ii Europe to the tar bast thg foreign ministers of all 14 Bassett's name all along, but was India's policy, he told Commu-1 member nations will get together, afraid Bassett would come back) PMlAcfirtTlPrfi. IS 'HOt tO allOW -tf____J 4_ im. ii.UVi if 1no Tmfoal. I Russia offered to join up with the united Western de- fense against possible Soviet ag- if the West would drop plans for a European Defense Community to include West Ger- man troops. The Russians also asked the Western Allies to join them in a European security pact that would keep Germany perma- nently disarmed and neutral. The U.S. State Department an- nounced iis rejection of such an idea. It charged Russia with try- ing to sabotage EDC plans and wreck NATO, leaving Europe dom- and "slug" him again if he reveal- ed his identity. Hall said he had picked up Bas- sett during a rain storm at a high- way intersection here and drove him to Oronoco before he was slugged, shot and robbed of his billfold and car. Bassett was arrested over the weekend in Salina, Kan. Author- ities planned to take him to Still- water later today. Frank G. Newhouse, county at- torney, said Bassett signed a six- page confession in which he: Admitted shooting Hall and rob- wrec u.jw-v...0 inated by the Soviet bloc. Britain j bing him of after having been noon, 51; precipitation, none; sun sets tonight at sun rises to- morrow at AIRPORT WEATHER (No. Central Observations) Max. temp. 60 at p.m. Wed- nesday. Low 39 degrees at a.m. today. Noon 47, visibility 15 miles, skies clear, wind from the northwest at 6-miles-pcr- hour, barometer at 30.27 steady, humidity 58 per cent. and France followed suit. The NATO meeting is expected to be limited to a review of world problems, including princi- pally those to be taken up at Geneva consultations on Korea, since 9 of the 14 are expected, to go on to Geneva as representa- tives of U.N. members which sent troops tc Korea. The NATO group also is expect- ed to take up the Indochina ques- tion even though the war there between the French Union and the given a lift by the wounded man, then driving Hall's car to Roches- ter, whence he left for Salina, Kan., where he was arrested over the weekend. Newhouse said Bassett admitted the shooting was done with a .25 calibre pistol stolen a week ago Tuesday from a Winona apart- ment. Newhouse said that Bassett had been dishonorably discharged from military service after having served 18 months in an Army dis DCLwuen me rrencn uuiun uic J.Q inuuuia ui Communist-led Vietminh rebels is ciplinary barracks for burglary, outside the organization's region I He had b-een held here under n.f I of responsibility. 000 bond. Crude Bomb Damages Cafe At Virginia VIRGINIA, Minn, iffi A home- made bomb planted in the doorway of a Virginia cafe exploded in a thundering blast early today, caus- ing extensive damage to the front of Tony's Coffee Shop. No one was injured. A Virginia contractor, John Len- ci estimated damage at Police Chief George Forte said the explosive apparently was fash- ioned from "a small cardboard box filled with taconite over a layer of dynamite. The taconite directed the "force vof the blast downward instead of out into the street." The cafe had been picketed for six months "by Local 84 of the AFL Restaurantj Hotel and Bartenders Union. Pickets were still parading in front of the damaged building today. The original signs used by pickets last fall stated that em- ployes were on strike. When the 12 employes of the cafe an ad in the Mesabi Daily News here saying they were not on strike and did not want to join the union, the banners were changed to read the place was "unfair to organized labor." Maj. Miles Reber, Com- manding General of the Army for Western Europe, was the first witness to testify in the Senate Investigating Subcom- mittee hearings in Washington today into the McCarthy-Army squabble. (UP Telephoto) Guard Convicted Of White Slavery MINNEAPOLIS iffl Jack L, Kreinbring, 31, former Minneapolis workhouse guard, was convicted Wednesday of white slavery charges by a federal court jury. Judge Mathew M. Joyce set sentencing for April 30. Paster, N.D. AifomeyGeneral Found Guilty BISMARCK, N.D. North Dakota attorney general and a St. Paul, Minn, coin machine dis- tributor were convicted by a federal court jury today of con- spiring to violate a federal law prohibiting the interstate transpor- tation of gambling devices. Atty. Gen. Elmo T. Christiansen, 33, who was re-elected to office in 1952 while under indictment, and Herman Paster, 50, head of the Mayflower Distributing Co., St. Paul, were accused of con- spiracy to violate a federal law that became effective Jan, 2, 1951. It was their second trial on the same charge. A federal court jury which heard their first trial a year ago was unable to reach a verdict. Attorneys for both Christiansen and Paster said they would file motions for a new trial. Judge Charles J. Vogel set next Tuesday ,as the time for hearing motions. I Both are free under bond. I The federal conspiracy act under which Christiansen and Paster were charged calls for penalties ranging up to fine and five years imprisonment. office to talk about a commission it was "hearsay" evi- for Schine. j Schine was "impa- At that time, Reber was the tient" when he was asked to fill Army's liaison officer with Con- out forms for a possible Army com- He is now commanding gen- j mission on last July 16. eral of U.S. Army forces in the Reber said the Army Tracspor- Western European "area. Reber, relating efforts he said were made to get a commission for Schine, said there was "unusual methods" and that "it wasn't nor- mal action." And, he declared, in his 10 years as liaison officer there was no case where he was put "under greater pressure." Reber was the lead-off witness as long-heralded hearings began on the stormy row between McCarthy and top Army department officials. The dispute turns on the conten- tation Corps, the Provost Marshal and the Office of the Chief of Psy- chological Warfare all found that Schine lacked qualifications for a commission in any of the three I units. When Reber said he had "two or three telephone calls directly from the McCarthy in- terposed that he didn't hear the testimony. When Mundt paraphrased it, Mc- Carthy said: "Is that what you said. "That I got two or three tele- tion McCaVtty and hs assi ian s phone calls .from you, Senator, sought by "improper means" to "'SMS sPeed m this Reber afd this that after Schine that the charges as to him and Schine were designed to interfere with (a) his investigation of Com- munism in the Army, and (B) an investigation of what he termed "misconduct and possibly law vio- lations" by H. Struve Hensel, as- sistant secretary of defense. At the outset of the televised hearings, before a packed Senate caucus room, McCarthy demanded I that the Army officials critical of him present their cases as indi- viduals, not as "the Department of the Army." The "bill of particulars" against fharae see whether a commission could asserts Ibe obtained in the Air Force or the Navy. Reber said the Air Force was not then commissioning any men directly from civilian life while the Navy's requirements were sub- stantially the same as the Army's. Ray Jenkins, special attorney for the subcommittee began a cross- examination of Reber. He brought out that Reber re- ceived many telephone calls with reference to inductees and pros- pective draftees from senators, representatives and others. Jenkins asked whether Reber felt at any time that McCarthy was by" to JW him as to individuals, but by an attorney for e- the Army Department. "IS" McCiellan Sen. that McCarthy's own bill of par- ticulars was signed "Joe McCar- thy, chairman." He suggested that under McCarthy's point of order Not High Pretsure m Arkl nntprf Reber Said he felt Mc' (D-Ark) noted Carthy wgs pressuring me to the word "chairman" should be i stricken out. The fencing over this was any great extent" but had thought McCarthy wanted a "favorable answer." Sen. Mundt (R-SD) presiding over the hearings, gave a solemn warning that "the reputations, the actions and perhaps thi that _since the formal complaint against Me- Carthy was not then before the committee, the point of order could not be raised at that time. He said Mundt pledged the subcommittee (Continued on 3, Column 3) HEARING   

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