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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: March 6, 1954 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - March 6, 1954, Winona, Minnesota                              Fair, Not So Cold To nig lii f; Colder Sunday CIVE MOW! GIVE NINETY-EIGHTH YEAR. NO. 89 SIX CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA, SATURDAY EVENING, MARCH 6, 1954 FOURTEEN PAGES uns aze in rto Ri ican Raid Warden Edwin T. Swenson of the Minnesota State Penitentiary at Stillwater displays the type of nose drops he said inmates were using to "get a The warden said criminal charges would be brought against five prison employes who smuggled the drops and whisky into the prison grounds. The men, including four guards, already have been suspended. (AP Photo) o Criminal Charges Loom at Prison STILLWATER, Minn, if) evidence warrants, crimina charges will be brought agains five employes and some 20 inmate involved in the Stillwater Prison contraband smuggling. Alvin. Gillette, correctional super visor in the State Department oi Welfare, said late Friday evidence gathered thus far would be put into the hands of the Washington County attorney for possible pro- eecutions. Gillette said his office w o u 1 c "press these complaints with full vigor." His statement came after Warden Edwin T. Swenson report- Wreckage of U.S. Air Force Plane Spotted NICE, France head- quarters in Nice said today the wreckage of a missing U.S. Air Force C47 had been spotted in the mountains behind this French Riviera city. The plane was carrying 20 per- sons when it disappeared Thursday on a flight from Rome to Bitburg, Germany. The police said a wing of the plane had been spotted by a French farmer, Etienne Gallean, through field glasses, and that they Aide of Stevens Resigns, Blames Lack of Support Reports Secretary Too May Quit Promptly Denied WASHINGTON A top aide to Secretary of the Army Stevens has resigned with a protest at the handling of the dispute, but a spokesman for the secretary said Stevens himself "has not resigned and has no in- tention of resigning." Stevens returned to his desk at the Pentagon today after a brief trip to New York, during which there were reports he was quitting the government. The aide who quit was John F. Kane, a special assistant who also worked for former Secretary Frank Pace. Kane announced his resignation from his job with a letter deploring what he termed a lack of "full fighting support" for Stevens in his troubles with Sen. McCarthy The letter con- ,.il_ T, JalLi will ildVe LU gratulated Stevens on "the gallant hower farm program as a whole or lose the value of it If to Put up for i Aiken, a strong supporter of ine Army. Former President Harry Truman smiled as he left the elevator of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel today to begin his morning constitu- tional as a policeman stood by holding a nightstick. Truman was flanked by an extra-heavy police guard as he took his walk in New York's 29-degree cold as a result of last Monday's attack on mem- bers of Congress by Puerto Rican Nationalists. (UP Telepboto) Keep Farm Program Intact, Aiken Warns By EDWIN B. HAAKINSON WASHINGTON Aiken (R-Vt) of the Senate Agri- culture Committee, said today Congress will have to adopt the Eisen- ed finding that nose drops, inhal- ers and whisky had been smug- gled the prison, Swenson said that four guards have made statements admitting they accepted leather handbags and wallets made by inmates as com- pensation for the smuggled goods. Two cases of eggs and some other produce from the prison poultry farm also were used ES "pay- he reported. The warden said the drugs i he drops and inhalers were of non-prescription nature. Inmate used the drops for intravenous in ections with needles smuggled int hem and chewed the contents o th inhalers, he added. The warden said the investiga ion began 12 days ago whe attendants noticed tha some prisoners were acting "absolutely ;trangely. There was no indicatio resigned. if violence but their behavior was I't normal, due to use of the drugs le added. William Conley, state crime bu eau agent, was called in and sus >ension of the five employes fol owed his investigation. had confirmed his report. The plane, mostly buried in snow, was at feet in the Alps, 10 miles southwest of the 3oy, 7, Pulls Sister From River STILLWATER, Minn. 1 ear-old Stillwater boy who would n't call his mother until the excite ment was over rescued his 8-year- old sister from the St. Croix River Friday night. The children, Victor and line Berglund, wandered down to the river after having dinner with their mother, Mrs. Cecil Berglund, in a Stillwater restaurant. While they were walking along a wall beside the river, Jacquelin tumbled off and broke through thin ski resort of Auron. iice- Victor jumped after her and Police said as far as they could cra.shed through the ice. He learn there was no sign of life dfag his sister to around the wreckage. They imme- diately began organizing foot part- ies to go to the scene, which they said was in a region very difficult to reach.Tlie plane was identified by markings on its wings. The site where the plane was spotted is only six miles from the Italian border, and on a mountain spire known as the "Peak cf Three Men." The craft carried 13 American servicemen returning from duty or leave in Italy or Tripoli, and three American civilians, plus a crew o four. CriminalNegligence Ruled in Death of St. Vincent Girl ST. VINCENT, Minn. (If) A coroner's jury ruled Friday thai an 11-year-old St. Vincent girl killed when a car ran into eight children Wednesday, "met her death through the criminal negli- gence of John Siator." Siator, 59, a shoemaker instruc- shore. Neither child can swim. After she fell in, Jacqueline shouted to her brother to "get but the boy said later he couldn't go for his "mother I pulled Jackie out." 'until He also said his resignation was due in part to poor health. Kane, reached by phone, did not say which of Stevens' superiors he felt hadn't rallied to the secre- tary's side in the dispute over McCarthy's handling of an Army general questioned in secret ses- sion. The Wisconsin senator has been criticizing the Army for the way it has dealt with alleged Com- munists in its ranks. But the only officials wlio rank above Stevens are Deputy Secre- tary of Defense Roger M. Kyes, then Defense Secretary Wilson and finally, P r e s i.d ent Eisenhower. Kane did say he excluded "every- body in the Army" from his lack of support charge. Resignation Denied The Chicago Tribune said last night that Stevens was "reliably reported" to have resigned. But associates and Mrs. Stevens said early today the secretary had "absolutely" anrl nnt program, hit out in an interview at any major modification of the program based on criticism of some features of it by individual members of Congress. He said: i "Success oJ: this program de- [pends upon adopting all of it. Nearly everybody can find some part or parts of it he likes." For Democrats to Fight Tax Cut on Stock Dividends WASHINGTON W Democrats said today they have decided to put up a House floor fight to try to kill a Republican sponsored pro- posal sharply reducing taxes on Nationalist Leader Held, Arrest Others Cubans Seized In New York At Same Time SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico lice captured Pedro Albizu Cam- pos, 62-year-old chief of the Na- tionalist party, after gunplay at his apartment today during a roundup aimed at the three dozen persons within the fanatical, independence minded group. Tear gas finally routed Albizu Campos. The apartment, set afire during he action, also yielded Doris Tor- resola, one of five women named n police warrants. Miss Torresola is a party secre- tary and sister of Griselio Torre- ola, who was killed in Washington n making an attempt on the life of former President Truman in 1950. Police Chief Salvador Roig said several shots were fired from Campos' apartment as the police closed in. Roig said the shooting in the House of Representatives by Puer- to Rican Nationalists was not the basis for the arrests here. The lo- cal politicians were picked up, he said, simply because they were members of a subversive group, and they are being charged with H. B. Kilstofte Dies of Injuries Received in Crash H. B. Kilstofte, 58, 272 Bierce St., Highway 14 three miles west ol a prominent Winqna general build- ing and construction contractor for the past 21 years, died early today at the Winona General Hospital of injuries suffered in an automobile accident near Lewiston Feb. 18. Kilstofte died at a.m., 15 days after he suffered multiple rib fractures, internal injuries and se- vere shock when bis car went off and ''definitely" not Stevens, away from Washington, could not be reached for comment Administration officials and Mc- Carthy have been embroiled in controversy since Stevens several weeks ago asserted he would not stand by and allow Army witness- es to be browbeaten by congres- sional committees or by anybody else. This happened after Brig. Gen. Ralph W. Zwicker, commandant at Camp Kilmer, N.J., had com- )lained to Stevens about the way McCarthy questioned him on the discharge of Maj. living Peress a dental officer whom McCarthy called a "Fifth Amendment Com- munist." Stevens ordered Zwicker and an- ither general to ignore a McCar- hy subpoena, but later rescinded his order after a "peace confer- nee" with McCarthy and Repub- ican members of McCarthy's enate Investigations Subcommit- ee. The agreement was generally egarded as a Stevens n interpretation lie secretary ballenged. a round f Pentagon and White House con- a new statement e-emphasizing his determination ever to permit abuse of people nder him. McCarthy has stead- astly refused to concede he ever bused any witness. tor at the Stony Mountain Peni- tentiary near Winnipeg, is being held in charge. jail at Hallock without Killed in the crash was Elaine Fitzpatrick, daughter of Mr. nnd Mrs. Jolin Fitzpatrick. Of the oth- ers who were hurt, Martin Gard- ner, 8, still is-in critical condition in a Hallock hospital. Witnesses identified a car Siator was driving at the time of his arrest as the death car. 2 Boys Killed in Truck, Auto ST. PAUL Wl Two brothers were killed and five other children injured when the auto driven by their school teacher collided with a feed-laden truck in rural Ram- sey County Friday night while they were on the way to a hayride. The county's death toll went to three for the night after another car ran off a road and struck a tree to kill the driver and critically injure his son. Fatally injured when the truck plowed into the car at intersection of U. S. 8 with County Road J were Raymond Sedarstrom, 13, and his brother Allen, 12. Injured and brought to Ancker Hospital here were Richard Ny- ;ard, 13; Darwin Nelson, 12; Pat McCarthy, 13; David Martin, 13, md Joseph Bjergo, 14. All of the ictims were students at Wood- rest School in Fridley, a northern uburb of the Twin Cities. The car, driven by Donald Wat- son, 25, the teacher, was travel- ling east on the county road. Lloyd Johnson, 40, Harris, Minn., said the auto loomed up so suddenly in his lights he did not have ai chance to stop on the main high-! way. I Watson was driving the first of a caravan of four cars taking 19 students to Circle Pines, near the accident scene, for the party. He said he was unsure of the way and was being directed by the boys in the car when the collision came. The Watson car was tossed onto its side while the truck, loaded with five tons of turkey feed, plowed a path 100 feet out into an adjacent field. Killed in the second rural Ram- sey County accident was Walter M. Baird, 39, living on Birch Road near WhHe Bear Lake. Taken to Ancker Hospital in critical condi- ion was his son, Walter C., 12. Officers said the machine left the road and smashed into a tree. The three deaths carried' the Minnesota highway toll to 92 this year, compared with 81 on the same date of 1953. stock dividends. They said this move would be included in the one motion allowed to the minority party when a vast tax overhaul bill, including the dividend proposal among many others, reaches the House floor. Republican leaders announced Fri- day they planned to bring up the bill March 17 and vote on it March 18, The 800-page measure would re- write almost all tax laws. An an- alysis by House Ways and Means Committee staff showed to- day it would provide in tax through more liberal first year. The relief figure climbs to more than two billions in later years. Court Appoints Attorneys for 4 Puerto Ricans WASHINGTON Court-ap- pointed attorneys today assumed responsibility for defense of four Puerto Ricans charged with wounding five members of Con- gress in a wild shooting demon- stration Monday. U.S. District Judge James W. Morris assigned the attorneys at a brief hearing yesterday. In San Juan, Puerto Rico, mean- two days this week Aiken has been j violating a local subversive act. acting as sort of a referee for Ro'g said Gov. Luis Munoz Mar- Agriculture Department officials in has revoked a pardon that freed and critical senators in a running i Albizu Campos from jail last Sep- dispute about new and old farm i tember. He had been given prison programs. terms totaling 54 years following a Main controversies ___ ter around proposals to shift gov- ernment ?riee supports to a flex- ible and lower level and to "set aside" 2Vi billion dollars worth of farm surpluses, or about half those now in government hands. The set aside would be a guar- antee by the government that the goods would never be moved in ordinary trade channels. .Accord- ingly, they would not be counted as part of surpluses when the pro- posed new flexible supports, based on amount of various farm prod- ucts available, were computed This procedure presumably would make a transition to a flexible system less abrupt. Late yesterday Aiken criticized people in government, including members of Congress, "Who be- lieve in a permanent system of government controls." President Eisenhower and Secre- tary of Agriculture Benson have said their new program would mean far less government controls over what the farmer plants and markets "I'm sorry to say it but I believe that those who favor controls are revolt he led in 1950. Fifty persons were killed in that outbreak. Two Cubans Seized In New York Raid NEW YORK seized an arsenal in a deserted-I o o k i n g Manhattan store Friday 'and placed two Cubans, alleged oppo-1 BEMIDJI, Minn. stolen nents of the Batista regime, under (automobile containing what police described as a "small arsenal" Lewiston and crashed into a tele- phone pole. The exact cause of the accident never has been determined, al- though pavement at the accident site was covered with moisture at the time. 2nd County FitalltY This is the second traffic fatality in Winona County thus far H. B. Kilstoftt Small Arsenal Found in Stolen Car at Bemidji while, Courtney Owens, represent- ing Chairman Velde (R-I11) of the House Un-American Activities Committee, conferred yesterday with Gov. Luis Munoz Marin, pre- sumably on plans to investigate activities on the mainland by the Aiken said. "They have almost gained control of one of our major political parties." Department officials said the President would have authority to give all the set aside commodities away but Under Secretary of Agri- culture True D. Morse later said such action was not contemplated; He said recovery of some of the value of the produce was planned. Sen. Schoeppel (R-Kan) had said regular foreign purchasers of U.S. farm products might halt or de- lay sales if they had reason to hope for a free ride. Other department spokesme said they now are holding re- serves for possible losses on mor than 2H billion dollars of farm arrest. Detectives swooped into' the store, on West 99th Street, and came up with crates of mortar shells, anti-tank guns, garand ri- fles, grenades and a big supply of shells. Later Mario Cruz, 34, and Ro- berto Oscar Acevedo, 36, were tak- en into custody. They were booked early today on charges of violating the weapons law. Police Commissioner Francis W. H. Adams described them as mem- bers of a Cuban organization op- posed to the regime of Fulgencio Batista, president of Cuba. Eight other persons were ques- tioned by police and released. The arsenal is the second dis- covered in the metropolitan area small, fanatical Nationalist party. A resolution .was introduced in the commonwealth senate for commission to investigate the party. At the arraignment here yester- day, the judge tried to explain to the defendants the significance of entering pleas and their rights to counsel and a fair trial. Harry Hastings, a secret service agent stationed in Puerto Rico, was called in as a Spanish-English interpreter. Finally Lolita Lebron, self-styled leader of the Nationalist demon- strators, said: "I would like it to be charged that what I committed was the defense of my country." "But do you enter a plea of not the judge asked. "Yes, on those Mrs. Lebron replied. One of the three male defen- dants said something about com- ing here "to defend independence of our country." The judge entered innocent pleas also for the three Cancel Miranda, Andres Figueroa Cordero and Irving Flores Rodri- "the same grounds." products held at the end of las year. They said these reserves amoun ed to 636 million dollars or a average of 24 per cent with pos sible losses ranging from a low of 12 per cent on cotton up to 9. per cent on dried milk. Public hearings will resumi Tuesday. James Roosevelt Seeks Backing for Race for Congress LOS ANGELES Roos- evelt is seeking his party's endorse- ment as Democratic candidate for Congress from the 26th California District. But he has notified the 26th Dis- trict Council, which meets here Sunday afternoon, that he may not abide by its recommendation if it )icks another of the 11 aspirants 'or the nomination. Mrs. Romelle Roosevelt's attor- ney, Arthur E. Schifferman, agreed Friday to a postponement until May 10 of a disposition hearing in her separate maintenance suit against her husband because of his political plans. since Carlos Prio Socarras was ousted as president of Cuba by Batista in March, 1952. Adams and other police officials gave these details on the latest arms seizure: Cruz, a bus boy ordered by im- migration officials to leave the United States by April 22, and Acevedo, garment cutter resident here since 1945, rented the store for a month last November. They said it was to be used to manufacture crates. Recently trucks started unloading heavy cases outside the store, the window of which had been painted black. was discovered by police here early today outside the Bemidji Implement Co. at the edge of town, Capt. Martin Daly and Patrol- man Cliff Smodel said they be- lieved the occupant or occupants of the car had fled only moments before. The car contained four .22 cali- ber rifles, a 30-30 rifle and two ihotguns, all loaded, plus a quan- tity of ammunition, a hunting inife, some soft drinks and candy. The officers said the guns appear- ed to be new and apparently had 'been stolen from a store. The officers went to the imple- ment company after discovering that the nearby Chester Berg Motors garage had been broken into and in cash stolen. Keys to cars stored in the garage were scattered about. At the implement company, po- found the car parked outside with a chain saw half in the car. Hearing noises, one officer went in from the front and one from year. On Jan. 11, a Rochester salesman was injured fatally when his car ran into a telephone post on East Sarnia street in the city. A native of Chicago, Kilstofte had been in the construction busi- ness with his father at Askov, Minn., for 13 years before coming to Winona 21 years ago. He had directed the construc- tion of many buildings throughout the state and in Wisconsin, Iowa and Texas. Among the buildings in Winona for which he held the general con- struction contract were the Jeffer- son School; the Heise Clinic; the Cathedral of the Sacred Heart and its rectory; St. Mary's Grade School; the St. Stanislaus School addition; Kelly Hall, men's dormitory and the St. Jo- seph's Hall additions on the St. Mary's College and Immaculate Heart of Mary Seminary campus; the YMCA, and the new Cotter High School building, the last now under construction. Projects in the Winona area in- cluded the Central Grade School at Rochester; schools at Harmony, Chatfield, Kenyon, Gopdnue, Rose- mount, Minnesota City, Minnea. polls and St. Paul; St. Joseph'! Hospital, Arcadia, Wis.; the Mar- quette School, Madison, Wis.; A- quinas High School additions, Crosse, and schools at Lake Mill! and Portage, Wis, During the war he had the con. tract for the construction of large housing projects at San Antonio and Houston, Tex. Other wartime projects were completed at Army and Air Force installations, most of them in and near San Antonio and Houston. Some of these were a number of warehouses, an airplane repair de- pot and an engine test cell building. There were projects at Kelly Field, Camp Stanley and Camp Hood, all in Texas. the back, but the place was empty. The car found outside the place had been reported stolen Monday night, along with from an Ellendale, N.D. garage. Early today another car was re- ported stolen from its parking place about three blocks from th implement company. A veteran of World War I, during which he was commission- ed a lieutenant while serving in France, he was a member of the Leon J, Wetzel Post 9 of the Amer- ican Legion, St. Matthew's Luth- eran, Church, the Winona Associa- tion of Commerce, Winona Athlet- ic Club, Winona Country Club and the Winona Contracting Construc- tion Employers Association, of which he was a past president. He was born in Chicago Nov. 13, 1895, the son of Mr. and Peder Kilstofte. Five Children In addition to his wife he is sur- vived by five children, Mrs. Loil Utz, Winona; Mrs. James (Carol) Dougherty and Irwin, Minneapolis; Mrs. James (Miriam) Dresser, Goodbue, and Lorin, at home; four brothers, Holger B. Kilstofte, San Tippy, 4-Month-Old Toy Fox Terrier broke both his front legs within five days at Rock Island, 111. His owner, Mrs. Edna Her- bert, Rock Island, sgys Tippy likes to jump, and jumping caused both fractures. (AP Wirephoto) Antonio, Tex.; Frode B. Kilstofte and E. B. Kilstofte, Wilmington; Calif., and S. B. Kilstofte, Roland, Iowa; eight sisters, Mrs. Henry Andersen, San Jose Calif.; Miss Herdis B. Kilstofte, Fresno, Calif.; Mrs. Ruth B. Lundsten, Buffalo, Minn.; Mrs. Cletus Rausch, How- ard Lake, Minn.; Mrs. George Headrick, Minneapolis; Mrs. James Avery Rush, Amarillo, Tex.; Mrs. Ejner Mortensen, Moss Point, Miss., and Mrs. Ezra Benz, Toppernish, Wash., and four grand- children. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Monday at St. Matthew's Lutheran Church, the Rev. A. L. Mennicke officiating. The body will lie in state at the church from 1 to 2 p.m. Monday. Burial will be in Woodlawn Cemetery. Friends may call at the Breitlow Funeral Home Sunday from 2 to 4 WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and Vicinity Fair to- night and Sunday. Not so cold onight, turning colder again late Sunday. Low tonight 20, high Sun-" day 34. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 lours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 45; minimum, 18; oon, 45; precipitation, none; sun ets tonight at sun rises to- lorrow at AIRPORT WEATHER (No. Central Observations) Max. temp. 47 at noon today. X3W 15 degrees at a. m. to- ay. At noon, the skies were clear ith visibility of 15 miles plus, IB wind from the southwest at i miles per hour, barometer at- 9.89 falling and the humidity is- 49 per cent.   

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