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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: March 2, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - March 2, 1954, Winona, Minnesota                              Continued Cold Tonight; Fair, Cold Wednesday Memo to Caesar A Lenten Feature Starting Wednesday NINETY-EfGHTH YEAR. NO. 85 SIX CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, MARCH 2, 1954 SIXTEEN PAGES Rep. Bentley Fighting for His Life Lollta Lebron Rafael Concel Miranda Andrei F. Cordero Irving Florei Four Consider Selves Patriots By BEM PRICE WASHINGTON are four Puerto Ricans three m and a woman in jail and accused of disrupting official business of the world's mightiest nation with gunfire. Although they expect to be punished, they do not consider them- selves criminals, but rather patriots. Mrs. Lolita Lebron and Rafael Concel Miranda made that quite clear Monday night 'in an inter- view at police headquarters barely eight hours after they let go with a wild fusillage of pistol shots that felled five congressmen. To Americans, the whole incident may seem incredible, but to the pair, somehow, George Washing- ton, the American Revelation and TODAY Stevens Fumbles Ch ance the shooting are connected. Certain facts are clear. They met in New York City Feb. Washington's perfect their fanatic plans. Obviously, Mrs. Lebron and Mir- anda, at least, thought of them-' selves as two of the world's little people; two people without a voice but with a burning message, "Puerto Rico must be Their two alleged associates in the shoot- ing did not appear at the inter- view. Mrs, Lebron reminded reporters, almost wildly, that "when you lib- erate your country, your people they fight and die." Mrs. Lebron, 34, the oldest of the four charged and the most articulate in English, said frankly they came to Washington "to make a political demonstration." She apparently had considered the very practical question of who By JOSEPH and STEWART ALSOPJ would 1'Sten to four Puerto Ricans WASHINGTON -As an awful' T" "n" object lesson, the real story of the McCarthy-Stevens imbroglio1 is worth recounting in all its peculiar detail. Here are the inside facts, which divide themselves naturally into .scenes of a drama: SCENE I: After being told he is unfit to wear a uniform by Sen. McCarthy, Gen. Ralph Zwicker called his superior officer, Lt. Gen. Withers Buress. "I don't have to take this says Zwicker in effect. "I quit." Gen. Buress tells Gen. Zwicker to keep his shirt on; then telephones the Army Chief of Staff, Gen. Matthew Ridgway, that Zwicker has threat- ened to resign his commission. SCENE II: Gen. Ridgway calls a meeting of senior Army officers, who agree that McCarthy is en- dangering the morale of the Army, j The generals then present their views to Secretary of the Arm} Stevens. Stevens immediatelj agrees that it is his duty to protec the men in uniform. He thereupon issues his celebrated defiance o Sen. McCarthy. SCENE III: The White House President Eisenhower's vacation headquarters at Palm Springs, the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the rest of official Washington learn of Stevens' action from the press tickers, for he has consultec no one. Presidential Press Secre- case, the of gaining attention, while violent, was successful. She and Miranda seemed to feel that through the interview they had achieved their end, Picked March Date She said March 1 was selected Cancellation of Corporation Tax Cut Predicted By CHARLES F. BARRETT WASHINGTON Key Repub- lican members predicted the House Ways and Means Commit- tee would act today to cancel two billion dollars in scheduled corpor- ation income tax cuts. They said this recommendation would be added, in a surprise ma- neuver, to an 800-page bill gener- ally overhauling the entire tax structure. The top corporation income tax 'ate, now 52 per cent, is scheuled to drop automatically to 47 per cent April 1. President Eisenhow- er has urged a one-year extension of the present rate to help reduce lie federal deficit. At on time the President's pro- )osal had stirred strong opposition, ncluding promises of a fight by Rep. Daniel A. Reed ffays and Means chairman. Also, here was widespread talk of a compromise at a 50 per cent cor- poration income tax rate. Committee members said much if the opposition has melted, how- ever, because of other tax cuts in effect or planned this year, notably jusiness benefits provided in the general tax revision measure. If approved by the House and Senate, would reduce revenues from in- .ividuals and business by about the first year and more later, chiefly through more liberal deductions. Previously, Republican commit- because that was the date for the tee members had ruled out any opening of the Inter American effort to deal with major tax rates Conference in Venezuela. tne revision bill The evident She said the shooting was to decision to shift tactics came at bring the attention of the private caucus late yesterday, pie to the plight of Puerto Rico, j after a series. of meetings involving It is a country that is not free." i Republican congressional leaders, Rep. George H. Fallon (D-Md) points to the spot where he was shot by Puerto Rican Nationalists Monday. Rep, Fallon is re- cuperating from his hip wound in Casualty Hospital in Washington. (UP Telephoto) 6 Navy Men Die in Helicopter Collision She country likened it to the American tary James Hagerty announces that Eisenhower is "standing aloof." It is arranged that Stevens and McCarthy are to confront each other at a public hearing. These developments throw the two great administration factions, the ap- peasers of McCarthy and those who would stand firm, into frenzies of activity. SCENE IV: The appeasers, who include the President's Congress- ional liaison officer, Wilton D. Per- sons, the attorney general's assist- ant for political intrigue, William Rogers, and one or two more, first seek to defer the date of the Mc- Carthy-Stevens confrontation. This is accomplished Monday. Their next purpose is to bring Stevens together with McCarthy and Sena- tors Mundt and Dirksen. This is accomplished Tuesday afternoon, when Stevens agrees to lunch with the senators on Wednesday. The vice president is informed of this. SCENE V: The White House group that favors standing firm places the whole situation before the President on his return from Palm Springs. They do not tell him (Continued on Page 5, Column 2.) ALSCPS colonies before the Revolution. The words came tumbling out as she declared that in Puerto Rico, "a woman of 60 is in prison There are many women in prison. There are many political prisoners." was scornful of the duly KEY WEST, Six Navy men died today in the flaming crash of two helicopters a mile from downtown Key West. The helicopters 'collided 100 feet off the ground seconds after taking off on a training escercise. Navy officials said they were flying in formation and as they turned to cross Fleming Key about a mile from the seaplane helicopter slid into the other. Both plunged to the bleak coral key and burst into flames. Each helicopter carried three men, a pilot, co-pilot and crewman. Their names were withheld pending notification of next of kin. The six were members of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron No. 1, formed two years ago, and the Navy said this was the first patrol accident here. Four Others Shot By Puerto Ricans Out of Danger By WILLIAM F. ARBOGAST WASHINGTON added 30 guards te the Capitol and resumed business as usual today although still aghast at the incredible pistol attack by Puerto Rican fanatics of the House chamber. An air of grimness was heightened by news that Rep. Alvin M. Bentley seriously wounded of five lawmakers hit by the spray of bullets from a gal- lery-remained in a critical condi- tion. A bulletin from the 35-year-old lawmaker's physician still gave him only a 50-50 chance to recover despite emergency surgery and four blood transfusions. Bentley, hit in liver and lung, was in an oxygen tent. The other wounded lawmakers were all reported to be doing well. About 200 members were in their seats when the House convened at 11 a.m. They stood with bowed heads as the Rev. Bernard Bras- kamp, chaplain, prayed for the re- covery of the victims, for strength and faith for their relatives, and for forgiveness for their assailants. Four Puerto Ricans Held The four Puerto Ricans held for e attack were described by po- lice as showing no signs of re- morse. U. S. Attorney Leo Rover an- nounced the government will be- gin presenting evidence against the four to a federal grand jury Wednesday. They are charged wit'i assault Eisenhower and Secre- tary of the Treasury Humphrey. GOP members said the new plan would: 1. Help counter a Democratic ar- gument that the revision bill is senhower today called on men Ike Asks All Join in World Day of Prayer WASHINGTON Ei heavily loaded in favor of business benefits. 2. Clear the air for separate 1 j i i i 41. a ji iui a i. lnJher handling of another bill dealin land. They have pledged allegi-! only with exdse tax rates ance to the United jt had been planned to put s Sthe corporate and excise rates into As for Miranda, he stood almost] a package stolidly for about 30 minutes, an-j i swering only an occasional ques- tion. someone asked a question about the details of the shooting and he burst out, "We don't talk about the little things" and em- barked on an arm swinging out- burst of words in which he said the only things he wanted to talk about were "my country and free- dom." Iowa Lock Passes First '54 Towboat KEOKUK, Iowa The first tow- boat of the year passed through lock 19 here Sunday with tons of petroleum on six barges bound for Bettendorf. The season opened Feb. 21 last year. A Movis Photographer moves in for a closeup of the flag and guns used by the Puerto Ricans who started a shooting spree in the House chamber Monday. (UP Telephoto) of good will" to join Friday in observance of a world day o prayer "to find the way towarc the goal of peace." The President's appeal was recorded for television and radio The day of prayer is sponsored by the United Church Women o: the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the Unitec States. The President said "At the very beginning of our own national life, at a time when the constitutional convention was plagued by dissen- sion and on the point of breakini up, Benjamin Franklin suggested that all join him in a moment of prayer. After that silent moment, the delegates suddenly seemed to be united in their purposes and there was born the great docu ment by which we live. "Throughout the history of this country, all the men and women we most revere as inspired leaders constantly sought divine guidance in the discharge of their public responsibilities. "The hosts of people who take part in this world day of prayer are 'seeking the help of the Al- mighty to find the way toward the goal of peace, toward the triumph of freedom and the unity of men. "In this noble purpose all men of good will may devoutly join." That Woman Problem VENTNOR, N. J. hottest debate of the year wound up a draw at the Debating Club of the Ventnor Avenue School. The topic? "Resolved: That only weakmind- ed females swoon over teen-age idols." to "kill the President" He was arrested yesterday ai about the same time a group oi Puerto Ricans in the balcony of the House of Representatives in Washington sprayed shots onto the crowded House floor, wounding five representatives. He was arrested on a charge oj nonsupport while he was testifying against his estranged wife, who was being tried in police court on a charge of breach of the peace, was taken to police headquar- ters for fingerprinting. Detective Capt. Joseph P. Mc- Donald quoted policeman Otto H. felie as saying Orozco threatened to "kill President Eisenhower while he was being fingerprinted. McDonald reported the incident to U. S. Atty. Simon S. Cohen, who I issued a warrant for Orozco's ar- j M. Holden. Holden, finding probable cause, i ordered Orozco held in bonds of Although two policemen testified before Holden that they had heard Orozco threaten the- President's {life, he denied having made the Dispute Settled at i statement. "I never carried a gun or a Albuquerque, N.M. pistol." he said on the stand. "No kill anyone." ALBUQUERQUE, N. M. W) i Cohen said that while Orozco has The police blotter told the story been drawing unemployment com- this way: Ipensation benefits here, he has "Subject walked into a tavern I made trips to New York and De- and explained loudly: Tm a Texan troit. Cohen said a complete inves- and I can whip any non-Texan in i tigation of the man's travels would the joint.' One man accepted the j be made "since we don't know if challenge. Subject Texan received i he is a lone wolf or a member of cuts on the back of his head when 11 h e Puerto Rican nationalist his head hit the floor." i group." Puerto Rican Charged With Threat to Ike HARTFORD, Conn. W-Pedro S, Orozco, 24, a Hartford Puerto Rican, will be presented before a federal grand jury at New Haven jWltb to kl11 against each of today on a charge of threatening Je congressmen. If convicted, they could receive sentences of up to 75 years in prison. If Bentley should die, the charge would be changed to murder which is punishable in the District of Columbia by death in the electric chair. Rep. Miller chairman of the House Interior and Insular Affairs Committee, said'he is con- sidering introduction of a bill to give Puerto Rico its independence. The purpose, Miller said, would be to give the United States some control over movement of Puerto Ricans into this country. Expresses Regret As a commonwealth, residents Puerto Rico now may come an go in the United States withou restriction upon their movements The delegate from Puerto Rico A. Fernos-Isern, arose to expres his regrets over Monday's occur ence. He read a telegram from Go Louis Munoz Marin of Puerto Rico who is now on his way to Wash ington, expressing shock at "thi savage and unbelievable lunacy. The telegram said the Puerto R: can people with "deep solidarity' condemned the action of the fan atics. The House gave a standing roum of applause. Others Wounded In addition to Bentley, th Bounded are Reps. Kenneth A Roberts (D-Ala) shot in the knee Jen. F. Jensen woundec n the left shoulder; Clifford Davis shot in the right leg and George H. Fallon, hi n the hip. Roberts also underwent surgery Rep. Alvin M. Bentley This Is A View of the House chamber Monday after three Puerto Rieans, including a woman, stormed in, began shooting and wounded five congressmen." The picture was made from behind the rostrum and from the general area in which the shooting took place. (UP Telephoto) but it was of exploratory nature. His physician reported that nerve damage proved to unfounded. Bentley was struck in the upper right chest by a bullet which traveled through the lung, diai- phragm, liver and stomach and came out his left side. After a 1% hour operation Mon- day the first-term multi-million- aire representative from Michigan was given only a 50-50 chance for "He is now in the hands of the said the surgeon, Dr. Charles Stanley White, after the operation. At 5 a.nr. CST today, however. Dr. Joseph R. Young, chief of staff at Casualty Hospital, said the 35-year-old congressman, while still in critical condition, had shown im- provement, was cheerful and able to talk coherently. Fairly Restful Night A a.m. report said Bentley had a "fairly restful" night; that temperature, pulse and respiration were at "a satisfactory though the pulse rate is higher than desirable." A morning bulletin from Belhes- da, Md., Naval Hospital said Jen- sen and Davis spent a comfortable night and were "feeling pretty well this morning." Both ate breakfast and "neither of them is on the list of seriously the bulle- tin said. It added that Jensen might be operated on today for removal of the bullet from his shoulder. A scene of confusion without pre- ;Continued on Page 2, Column 3.) SHOOTING Gunman Slugs Grocer, Flees With RACINE, Wis. A lone gun. man slugged James Coffey, co- iwner of the Marcoff Food Store, and fled with more than in jasa, in a bold, daylight robbery Monday. Coffey said the bandit hit him with the pistol when he told him here was only in the cash reg- ster. The gunman marched the into a back room where ash and checks were kept in eparate cigar boxes. Passing up he checks, the intruder pocketed lie money, then forced Coffey into ie basement at gun point. Coffey heard a car drive away while he was in the basement. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and Vicinity Partly loudy tonight, lowest 14 above, Wednesday generally fair and con- tinued cold with highest in after- oon 28. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 ours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 46; minimum, 23J oon, 28; precipitation, none; sui ets tonight at sun rises morrow at AIRPORT WEATHER (No. Central Observations) f; Max. temp. 40 at p.m. Mon- ay, min. 22 at a.m. todajg oon 29, scattered yer of clouds at feet, visT' ility 15 miles, wind 18 miles pe'r our from west northwest, barom- er 30.00 steady, humidity 55 per ent. -i   

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