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Winona Republican Herald: Tuesday, February 16, 1954 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - February 16, 1954, Winona, Minnesota                              Clearing, Colder Tonight; Fair, Warmer Wednesday Enter Dennis the Menace Contest Now NINETY-EIGHTH YEAR. NO. 73 SIX CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 16, 1954 SIXTEEN PAGES Willis P. Bryant, 32, poured milk for his family at a police station in Detroit, Monday, after their daughter, Penny, died in an auto that had been the family's home for two nights. Police said the child appeared to have died from suffocation. They were forced out of a hotel two days ago. Left to right: Bryant; Linda Lee, 2; Mrs. Bryant, 29; Paul, 4; and LeRoy, 5. An inquest into the infant's death has been ordered. The Salvation Army gave the family shelter temporarily. (AP Wirephoto) Support Cut Called Blow to Dairy Income Humphrey Claims Farmers Will Lose Million Yearly WASHINGTON tfl The eight- cent per pound cut April 1 in butter price supports will cost dairy farmers 600 million dollars an- nually. Sen. Humphrey (D-Minn) who ma-le that estimate late Monday, said he intended to make a Senate speech on tie matter. "It's a pity the Agriculture De- partment is so barren of ideas it can't come up with anything bet- ter than the jur.ior Min- nesota senator declared. Court Returns To Hi is r Moth er Ike Bucks More Aid to Indochina By JACK BELL 1 to volunteer to fly French planes. WASHINGTON Ei- Shipments 'of American material PORTAGE State of Wis- consin was ordered today to return to Mrs, Dorothy Tschudy the lit- tle two-year-old foster son it forced her to surrender after the death of her husband. for in an unidentified foster home pending disposition of the legal case in which the youngster is in- volved. Attorney Oscar Toebaas of Madi- son, who represented Mrs. Tschudy, called the decision "the "I've got everything waiting for j most wonderful decision I have clothes, ever seen come down. It is of tre- said Mrs. Tschudy at Monroe Imendous importance." where the 29-year-old widow lives and works as a hospital nurses's aid. i "I'm so happy I don't know which way to turn. I've been call- ing up everyone I know to tell so hard." be drastic. He pointed out that the I cfhlm' sa: Midwest would be especially seem hit because much of the affected Dut ve butter, cheese and milk for the nation is produced in that area. Thye said he believed that (i) Congress should have ha.d a chance first to work out a program and (2) that the cut in the support price for butter, cheese and dried Toebaas said Mrs. Tschudy had received letters from people in every state of the union. child in the custody of the Wel- fare Department. In his opinion, Judge Morrison said the state had made no com-1 plaint of the relationship that de- veloped between Mrs. Tschudy and the baby during the time the young- ster was with her. The department was satisfied with every detail of Mrs. Tschudy's petition, he said. "It is also uncontradicted that Jeffrey made normal progress and Columbia County Judge Elton 1 was equally devoted to the petition- J. Morrison, in his momentous de-jer Mrs. the court said, cision, handed down Monday (adding: night, held that the State Wel- fare Department had exceeded its authority when it set up a policy re- quiring a child to have both father At Madison Atty. Gen. Thorn- and mother in adoption cases. son's office reported today the j This was the rule invoked by the state would appeal the court ruling department when it forced Mrs. returning the child to Mrs, Tschudy. j Tschudy to give up baby Jeffrey "Under such circumstances, I cannot bring myself to believe that the tragic loss of the adoptive fath- er, as unfortunate as it was, and as satisfactory and capable a father as he proved to be, should neces- sarily require that the child lose not only the only father he has senhower is reportedly standing firm against increased French and British requests for broader Amer- ican participation in the Indochina are reportedly being stepped up. Informed sources said the Presi- dent indicated that because of cesseci- their interest in Malaya the British have joined the French in urging j milk should have been more gradual. "The drop is down to the very minimum permitted under the Thye told a reporter. "That I to study the law to de- will have a drastic effect upon Jermme the immediate status of Asst. Atty. Gen. William Piatz said he had conferred with depart- ment officials and it was deter- mined that the issue needed final settlement to determine power of the department and of the courts. Platz said he had not had op- the price of milk in areas where the bulk of the milk must be pro- Effect Severe said the effect will be more The President was said by in-1 more American help in Indochina" I severe in suoh producing formed sources, to have told Re-j This conceivably could include states _ as Minnesota, Wisconsin, publican congressional leaders the naval and air units. only manpower commitments he! Adm. Arthur Radford, chairman intends to make are for 200 armed I of the Joint Chief.-, of Staff, and services mechanics already sent to Indochina, plus permitting civilians TODAY Russians Have New Bombers the Dakotas, Iowa and other dairy areas than in New England and Eastern states where large amounts of fluid milk are con- sumed. Sen. Wiley (R-Wis) said he re- gretted Benson's "premature an- nouncement" of the drop in the support prices. Under Secretary of State Walter Bedell Smith faced Senate Foreign Relations Committee members in a closed session today in what could develop into a searching re- view of U. S. military strategy as it affects foreign policy. In this connection, Sen, Lyndon _____t ___ ___ uiji _uti uw ,____________, B. Johnson of Texas, the Demo- note that the'secretary w'iil shortly (are penetrating the "lower'Ievef of cratic leader, said in an interview j recommend additional outlets for I Crystal Cave. "It is true we have a problem of dairy surpluses on our serious the baby, Jeffrey, now nearly three years old and being cared last August. Her husband Vernon j known, but should also have to died in April, 1953, They had been planning to adopt Jeffrey. Judge Morrison-, who heard ar- guments in the case after Green County Judge Harold Lamboley disqualified himself, said the state "exceeds its authority and consti- tutes the act of legislating" when it requires that both parents must be living to petition for adoption of a 'Orchid Paradise' Greets Explorers By ED EASTERLY CRYSTAL CAVE, Ky. (ffl-The sight of "an orchid paradise" in stone today rewarded the men and I exploration on the third day of its seven-day expedition. The search was put on a round- the-clock basis, with four teams in lose the only mother he has known. Cites Daily Fear "I do not think it makes for the best interests of a child for pro- spective adoptive parents, who give a child all the love, care and affection it is within the power to confer over a period of a year or more to live within daily fear that they may lose that child in the event one spouse is taken even a day before the adoption may be completed. Tenseness, apprehen- sion, fear of the future are not conducive to a happy, relaxed and successfull family relationship." Judge Morrison said there was evidence Mrs. Tschudy made President Cela! Bayar of Turkey tried on for size a traditional "Texas Stetson Hat" at an official dinner given in his honor late Monday, in Dallas, Texas. Making the presentation was the Dal- las mayor, R. L. Thornton, left. Right of Bayar is an official interpreter, Orhan EraJp. (UP Telephoto) France Stands Firm Against Russ Lures By PRESTON GROVER yesterday analyzed bit by bit BERLIN Big Four con- ference battle for France appeared ended today, following clearcut Soviet package deal for a Eu- ropean security pact which would neutralize Germany, push Atneri- French refusal to every major can assistance out of Europe and "some improvident remarks foi- proposal made by Russia in the j make Russia the sponsoring power lowing the death of her husband, ipast three weeks of talks here, (in a "Molotov doctrine" for this and again when Jeffrey was taken j It was not known, however, what from her. damage Soviet Foreign Minister "If she did, I consider they can Iv. M. Molotov may have done to be charged to the emotional strain the cause of the six-nation Eu- Wiley sad. "I am glad to (women of nerve and stamina who j the field at all times. these losses occasioned. "The state feels she is posses- sive to the point of considering only he believes members of Congress need to know more about the ad- ministration's "new look" military program. "Our judgment is no better than our he said. "I want to get all the information that I disposal of these surpluses. "On the other .hand, we must not iose sight of the fact that the future of many dairy' farmers de- pends to a serious extent on ade- quate parity supports." Wiley said he is again stating By JOSEPH and STEWART ALSOP can to determine whether we arejthat if this country can spend bil- WASHINGTON-The Russian air shortsighted in our military industry is now producing two new Sen Gore (D.Tenn) said ta a heavy bomber types capable interview he believes the round top strikes at American breakup in fanure o{ the gets carrying atomic or hydrogen Big Four conference in Berlin "in- bombs. There are the 200 and the Ilyushin 38. This highly significant fact of in- ternational life has been suspected for some time. The probability that I officials seem agreed that it will one of these new bombers had I be necessary for American ground dicates there may be need for re- consideration of the drastic reauc-j Benson's order: "I think that is one tion of American ground forces." j Of the most disastrous things done He said and British by the Agricuiture Department in mjr memory." Instead of cutting the support price, he said, it should And the spectacle, found 300 feet below the earth's surface in this Mammoth Cave National Park area, is believed to be only a sam- ple of the wonders hidden in the wilderness of unexplored passages. The National Speleological (cave study) Society, 'now fully manned defenses, "houTbT spend a few hundred millions here ree m es lrom Ole cave en' at home-to sustain the welfare of the crucial farm segment of our population." Rep. O'Konski (R-Wis) said of lions of dollars abroad "for our TV.O in 'her own selfish interests. I am not jment. The room of enormous flower- ;mnroS5oH I Tn liko formations in gypsum is on the ropean Defense Community Treaty, soon to be brought up for ratification by the French Parlia- edge or the uncharted area and had been observed before by only a few intrepid explorers. William Burke Miller, a news- man accompanyi the expe- dition, described it as "an orchid TiarflrtlCp nn tho roiling" "tlin I impressed. Had she surrendered I In what was doubtless his major Jeffrey without exhausting every means to protect him, as she saw it, she would have been charged with losing interest'in him." The judge said Mrs. Tschudy had supported satisfactorily the child while he was with her and speech of the conference, French Foreign Minister Georges Bidault paradise on the ceiling" and "the any discipline she used on the most beautiful sight any of us had youngster was within proper lim- PVPT- er, that both bombers are in ac- tive production, and are already being flown by regular formations of the Soviet strategic air army. problem? Indochina Information Program Stepped Up trance, stepped up the tempo of The news is a depressing com- mentary on Secretary of Defense _________........ Charles E. Wilson's contention that! Streibert, director of the U S Soviet military preparations are j information Agency, said 'last I not offensive" in character. his agency has increased its I have been raised to 100 per cent. Dairy Surplus O'Konski said he believed there was a good chance that Congress would take some action before April 1 to prevent Benson's order from going into effect. Sen. Young (R-ND) said the drop PHILADELPHIA Wi Theodore, jto 75 Per cent "W'U do harm to farmer but will not solve surplus problem." "There is a recognized surplus proves that the Soviets are press- program in the Indochina area re- 1 Young said, ing the development of offensive cently by 50 per cent T weapons with great energy. The] "I have authorized a stepup of secretary was talking through his lour operations there to a level hat. New Bombers The existence of these new bombers radically changes the whole air-atomic balance. Until now the TU4. an improved ver- sion of the B29 crudely compar- able to our B50, has been the workhorse of the Soviet strategic air army. The TU4 is entirely capable of striking any American target, if it cannot do the roun trip from Soviet air bases to Amer ican targets and back again. Thus the strategic air army i essentially a one-shot air force so long as it must mainly depen upon the TU4. Expert opinion i unanimous that the Soviet ai crews are trained to fly one-way missions, and that the Soviet high command will order one-way mis sions, if need be. Nonetheless, was and is a severe handicap to have a one-shot air force; The im portance of the new bomber types (Continued on Page 1, Column 5 ALSOPS WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and Vicinity Clearing and a little colder tonight. Wed- nesday fair and warmer. Low to- night 24, high Wednesday 45. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 49; minimum, 29; noon, 40; precipitation, none; sun sets tonight at sun rises to- morrow at AIRPORT WEATHER (No. Central Observations) Max. temp., 47 at p.m. Monday. Minimum. 27 degrees at a.m. today. Noon readings- temp. 36, scattered layer of clouds at feet, wind from the north at eight miles per hour, visibility, 15 miles, barometer 30.23 steady, humidity 48 per cent. that had originally been set for he said in an interview. but I believe a better and more effective program could be worked out to assure a fair price. I suppose Roosevelt Hints Wife Took Files From His Office By GRAHAM BERRY James Roosevelt, who says documents were missing from his files after his estranged wife broke into his office last August, resumes the stand today at a hearing on her petition for support. The hearing is to determine whether the eldest son of the late seen. The stone flowers, he said, "hung in clusters of indescribable beauty and their colors ranged from pure white to red brown." They formed over the centuries in a reaction of the limestone with moisture in a circular room 18 feet in circumference and five feet high. The sight whetted the enthusi- asm of the 32 men and women in the expedition's Advance Camp No. 1, three miles and six hours of crawling and climbing from the cave entrance. Joe Lawrence Jr. of Philadel- itations, "Relying entirely upon the evi- j dence adduced at the trail, it ap- j pears that Jeffrey, now nearly three years old, is eligible for adop- j tion, and that the only mother he i has ever known is waiting to re-1 ceive him.': Nationwide Attention continent. Bidault turned it all down, quiet- ly and firmly. He denounced the proposals one by one as not con- tributing in any big way to peace. There remained the question whether the Western Big Three could pull out of the conference at the last minute some hope of ending the Indochina fighting this year. This may come up over caviar and vodka tomorrow night, on the eve of the conference ad- journment, when Bidault dines with Molotov at the Soviet Em- bassy. At that dinner Russian "gooc! of- fices" may agaifl be offered to stop the Indochina war, which has been draining French military manpow- er and the French treasury for seven years. Such an offer was tendered privately near thg start i of the conference, also at a dinner jat the Russian Embassy, but never SUPERIOR, Wis. Hi James has come out into open debate Cigarmaker's Slayer Draws 14-Year Term IE. Booth, 33, today'was starting Nationwide attention was drawn i a 14 to 25 years term in prison to the case when the state agency forced the former Albany, Wis., woman to give up the child. Friends and relatives in Green County met to map plans in the fight to leturn Jeffrey to Mrs. Tschudy. A fund was organized to carry on the legal fight and Atty. Oscar Toebaas of Madison was re- pedition, arrived at the outpost midnight to take charge of the1 as push into unknown area. f Scouting teams still are search- ing for a site for Advance Camp No, 2, which must be six hours farther in the cave. The teams are equipped not only (Continued on Paqe 71 Column 7) iPresident Franklin Roosevelt is crawling but have mountain- on Kage 11 column i) able to pay a dg_ climbing gear for scaling domes manded by his wife Romelle. She I wnicb. rise to a height of 50 feet Judge Morrison was called into the case to hear lengthy and emo- tional arguments from both sides. for the fatal beating of an aged of the Big Four. Through much of yesterday's meeting. Molotov was offering to cigar maker whose watch he stole. about things to whjch fte w t Booth, who lives in Duluth j obiects-for exam i e the relation- pleaded guilty to a charge obiects-for exam pi e, the relation- of shjp of the United states Red second degree murder and was jchina and Canada to his pr osed sentenced late Monday by Superior Judge Walter A. Dahl. He ad- mitted beating to death Andrew Stariha, 77, in the latter's small new European bloc, or how fast occupation troops could evacuate a neutralized Germany. He even ofered to "study" whether his Eu- Lly nni.uit.1 .113 IV tobacco shop here Saturday. ropean peace pact would The slaying climaxed a crime j the 14-natior. North Atlantic Treaty spree during which Booth admit- i alliance ted he also had robbed one man I Today the ministers again de- Asst. Atty. Gen. William A. Platz i and beaten and stabbed two others, i bated the Austrian independence defended the department. j Duluth and Superior police gave i treaty question with little hope of The Tschudys got the boy from I this version of Booth's activities; I agreement j. the' department in March, 1952. Judge Morrison held that his court had authority to intervene in the case whenever the state "ex- Marine Col. Frank H. Schwable, accompanied by Mrs. Schwa- ble, arrived at Marine Corps Headquarters in Washington today where he will face a Court of Inquiry convened to consider whether Communist torture should excuse an officer for "confessing" to germ warfare. Col, Schwable broke under Red pressure and signed germ warfare "confessions" which he repudiated after his release from a Korean prison camp. (UP Telephoto) seeks the sum for herself and their three children pending trial of their separate maintenance suits. Mrs. Roosevelt contends her bus- ifour men' became stranded band is worth two million dollars fatigue on the three-mile route to Advance Camp No. 1, finaBy arrived after 13V4 hours. Among them was Mrs. Ida V. Sawtelle of Brooklyn, the camp cook, Sh ered with." He said the money was for his iwn use and that Sloan has re- iaid the entire amount. Asked by his attorney, Samuel Picone, why he had placed the remove him. The prediction was published in the American Aviation Daily. It said the group opposing Harris is led by William Salvatore, described as the largest single stockholder in the airline. The paper said Salvatore's rep- resentative on the NWA board, C. Frank Reavis, New York attorney, led a "no-confidence" vote against Harris at a meeting early in Jan- uary. Salvatore was described as op- posed to establishment of executive headquarters in New York and the noney in trust, Roosevelt replied aircraft re-equipment program, e had lost confidence his wife i both Harris projects, not withdraw the entire! Croil Hunter, chairman of the mount from a joint account they j NWA board, said he had no com- reviously had had in New York. I ment on the story. trary and the withholding of the state's consent to adopt Jeffrey Toffl0rrow from Pine Bluff, Ark. Friday by i secret session to see if anything Cecil Talbot and both spent the j can be agreed on about a Korean night at a West Duluth hotel, i peace conference with Red China. Sometime in the cariy hours of The west says that also might grow Saturday, Booth departed with into negotiations about Indochina. of Talbot's money. Russian sources still insist Going to Superior, Booth attack-i France should be giving more at- ed Matt Moe, 54, in a hotel: tention to Molotov's first offer on washroom and robbed him of S27, Indochina. This was an unofficial "is likewise arbitrary, thus wav-jMoe suffered a cut lip and broken ;offer, but it was reported in the ing and dispensing with the nee-j nose. Taking a taxi back to Du-1 Soviet Communist party newspa- essity of consent of the state" inliuth. Booth entered the second-j per Pravda, which reports nothing granting Mrs. Tschudy's petition, 'hand store of Samuel Kasper, 65.1 the Kremlin doesn't want reported. Flames Spread Through the office building and main warehouse of the Sibley Lumber Co. in Harvey, 111., Monday as firemen from five other suburbs joined in helping the Harvey de- partment fight the blaze. Damage was estimated at more than (UP Telephoto)   

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