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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: January 25, 1954 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - January 25, 1954, Winona, Minnesota                              Freezing Drizzfe Tonight, Snow On Tuesday NINETY-EIGHTH YEAR. NO. 54 SIX CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA, MONDAY EVENING, JANUARY 25, T954 Want Ads Cost as Little As 65 Cents SIXTEEN PAGES sia to nite Germany Ike Submits 8-Point Housing Program Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Hemingway Safe After Two Air Mishaps in Africa Hemingway Safe In African Crash KAMPALA, Uganda Ernest Hemingway and his fourth wife were safe and unhurt today after two plane crackups here in the big game wilds of central East Africa. The couple's chartered sightseeing plane was damaged Saturday when they landed alongside the Upper Nile to take pictures. Later TODAY a rescue plane cracked up as it I tried to take off with them. Both i times nobody was hurt. Today the Hemingways were headed by road for Entebbe, at the head of Uganda's Lake Vic- toria. Asks Four More Years of Public Encouragement Suggests New Units in Next Four Years WASHINGTON UP) President Eisenhower today gave Congress an eight-point program for revis- ing federnl housing laws with the declared aim of providing "good housing in good neighborhoods for every American. Eisenhower urged authorization of four more years of public hous- ing, with new units to be started. The rate, a year, is the one now authorized. But this program, the President said in a special message to Con- gress, >should be coupled with "a new and experimental" plan to encourage private enterprise to meet the needs of low income families. The government should underwrite longer-term mortgages with lower down payments for families left homeless by slum clearance, he said. Overhaul Proposed The proposed, stem-to-stern over- laul of the housing program should >e based, Eisenhower said, on 'full and effective utilization of mr competitive economy." The President said: "The federal government must Dulles Presides At 1st Session of Big 4 Ministers BERLIN Soviet Union, Britain and Franca laid down their views today on how to cure Europe's cold war ills and the Big Four foreign ministers conference then recessed until Tuesday. The first day's session lasted nearly four hours. U. S. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles presided as chairman of the first session. He reserved the views of the U. S. government for Tues-------------------------------------- day. Earlier today France and Brit- ting in, Molotov arrived here Sat- 1 urday with this proposal on his am pleaded with the Russians v F join the West in uniting Germany) Secretarv of state John Foster as a( member of a sa.e commu- j Mo'JotoV) Foreign Secretary Thousands Of Students are shown massed out- side of the British Embassy in Madrid, Spain, to- day, in a demonstration against Britain. Shout- ing, "We want and stoning police guards, the students added new tensions to the diplomatic crisis between Spam and Britain. (UP Telephoto) rovide aggressive and positive eadership. At the same time ac- tions and programs must be voided that would make our citi- ms increasingly dependent upon le federal government to supply eir housing needs." Calling for slum eradication and new-home building level high enough to of the British colony of Kenya, Saturday for a 600-mile flight to the 400-foot Murchison Falls of Uganda. As Marsh landed ths small Cessna plane for Hemingway to take pictures near the falls, the undercarriage was damaged and the party could not take off. The and social well being of our coun- try" Eisenhower said: "I am convinced that every American family can have a de- cent home if the lenders and communities and the local, state and federal governments, as well as individual citizens will put j their abilities and determination j energetically to the task." Complex Program Presented By JOSEPH and STEWART ALSOP Eisen- J i I, T 11UI, LCUXC Ul-L. fcj.lt; hower has by no means finished plane had no radi and h j{ presenting his massive legislative to return East M program to the Congress and the ways launched a search country. The economic report, a The Cessna was about'300 yards doUars and money message on housing and a message ,from tne victoria three grants up to ?50 miU'on dollars, to recommending amendments of the miles below tne faiis, and 'in the tie ava'laDle to cities to ren- Atuniic energy Act are still to 'middle of scrub trees and thick decaying areas and elimiji- come. But thp address on the State-1 hush ate existing slums of-the-Union, the budget, and the Hemingways and Marsh Mortgage Insurance Federal Housing Administration mortgage insurance to help home owners rehabilitate aging houses in declining neighborhoods. FHA financing for the purchase of old houses as favorable to the buyer as the down payment and mortgage terms on new. houses. Increasing the FHA loan insur- ance for repair and modernization from to and giving Mitchell 1st T-H Hearing Witness WASHINGTON Senate Labor Committee, torn by dissen- sion between Republican and Democratic members, today summoned Secretary of Labor Mitchell as the first witness in hearings on Presi- dent Eisenhower's 14 proposed revisions of the Taft-Hartley law. Mitchell was certain to face searching interrogation from Dem- ocrats and from Republican Sen. Ives of New York over Eisen- Minnesota and He called for: Federal loan funds totaling 700 I Populations Up Spanish Students Riot, Demand Gibraltar Back MADRID Police on horse- men and five students were in- jured. messages on labor and farm prob- lems, on social security and on health, are now out of the way. This half-pound or so of docu- of them a plain ex- position of a complex subject or already enough to prove one point. In range and scope, in order and coherence of presentation the Eisenhower pro- gram for 1954 is due to set some- thing of a national record. It may be worth describing bow this rec- ord has been achieved. Relies on Staff As might be expected from his past training, the President relied on his staff to do the day-to-day I work By the beginning 'of las't Native of Bemidji October, when the wheels began to I turn Eisenhower himself had set! BEMIDJI, Minn m Mrs out the _ necessary major guide-1 Ernest Hemingway who survived posts. With the direction of advance I two plane crackups in the big well marked by- the President, game wilds of central East Africa White House Staff Chiei Sherman j with her husband, is the former Adams named a sort of staff com- Mary Welsh of Bemidji mittee to lay out the campaign in detail. meanwhile, had hailed a passing launch taking tourists to the falls. It brought them to Butaba, 40 miles south on Lake Albert, where a rescue plane landed to take them to Entebbe. The rescue plane was damaged taking off and failed to become airborne. One it burned. Again nobody was hurt. The party then took to the road I homeowners five years instead of for the 185-mile trip southeast to years to repay. Reorganizing the government's Entebbe. population went from to and Wisconsin's from to according to a study released Sunday by the Census Bureau, which compared population figures for April 1, 1950 and July 1, 1953. The Dakotas and states in the South and Northeast experienced most of the population declines in the past three years, a Census Bureau study showed today. bower's recommendation that the government conduct a secret poll of employes whenever a labor dis- pute enters the strike stage. In a speech two weeks ago, Mitchell indicated he wanted Con- gress to give special study to -this proposal. The other 13 points in Eisenhower's program, he said, should speedily be enacted into law. The committee, headed by Sen. H. Alexander Smith was split wide open last week when wiuu, u cu lu a amlllall Democrats refused to consent to j stone-throwing demonstration Jan. a vote on Eisenhower s nomination 22 of Albert C Beeson to the National Driven back from the embassv back and afoot today battled thou- sands of Madrid university students who staged a firey demonstration demanding the return of British- ime to negotiate a peace treaty held Gibraltar to Spain. Ten police-1Tne Russians have plumped for nity" of peaceful nations. France's Georges Bidault and Britain's Anthony Eden laid their governmental policy declarations on the square table of the Big Four parley soon after the foreign ministers formally convened in the American sector Allied Control Authority building. The French-British stand, back- ing up Dulles' previous policy statements, ran sharply counter to the views expected from Soviet Anthony Britain, and Bi- dault began their historic but not too hopeful Berlin sessions in the Allied Control Authority building in the American sector. It was Molotov's first visit to West Berlin .since the 1945 Pots- dam conference. It was Duiles" first major diplomatic mission since he became secretary of state. The four sat down together with their advisers around a square table under a ceiling painting of Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov. the angel Gabriel blowing his Bidault touched off the brass-1 trumpet of doom, tacks discussions with an assertion Their first business was to pose that the conference should be con- fined to German unity and an Au- strian peace treaty. Moscow has already said this meeting should be the springboard for talking about Asia, too, with Red China taking part. The West is standing solidly against this. Eden Follows Bidault The French minister declared the belief of Paris that a united Germany linked to a Western fam- ily of nations that is purely de- fensive in character is the surest way to prevent rebirth of ancient Prussian militarism. Moscow's rage over the North Atlantic pact and German participation in Eu- ropean defense has been some- thing less than secret. Eden, suave and silver-haired, 'ollowed Bidault with a declaration proposing free eleetions'to form an all-German assembly which in tura would form an all-German govern nent. Then he said, 'would be the the rival Bonn and East Berlin regimes to create between them- selves the machinery for a com- Police fired revolvers in the air Reichstag, a view that would and charged with night sticks to force the West to recognize the break up the wild demonstration East zone communists as equals. in which the students knocked five At ttis first stlch meeting. guamsmen from their mounts. The five s BidauJt said; f om tt to a v< Labor Relations Board, which ad ministers the Taft-Hartley law. Smith charged his Democratic col- leagues with "filibustering" and with attempting to embarrass Eisenhower. Sen. Lehman sup- ported by the other five committee Democrats, countered angrily there was no such intention. He said Democrats were not yet satis- It also indicated people still seem that Beeson.was quaiified for no fnlmiinnrt T-Tciv rL-r-fmlfivi'v Hemingway's Wife to be following Horace Greeley's advice of the last century to "Go West, young man." Western states had the greatest population growth. The principal members of this staff committee were White House Counsel Bernard Shanley, Legis- lative Liaison Officer Hilton Per- sons, speech-drafter Bryce Harlow, and staff members Gerald Morgan After being graduated from high school here, Mary Welsh enrolled at Northwestern University. In 1934 she became assistant society editor of the Chicago Daily News. (Continued on Page 8, Column 6) Generally, the pattern of shifting populace was much the same as IKE during the 10 years of 1940-50. WASHINGTON UP-Here are the eight points of President Eisen- hower's housing program as he listed them: 1. Neighborhood rehabilitation and elimination and prevention of slums. He proposed 700 million dol- lars of loans and 250 million of She joined Time and Life maga-j elimination of slums; and Jack Martin. resenting the budget was i w_r TT added to the group from outside.' ar JL ments and agencies were ordered to submit their legislative propos- als by Nov. 1, the White House Staff Committee had before it some 276 different projects requiring legislation. The character and past history of i these projects varied enormously. With a whole new government de. partment to organize, Mrs. Oveta Gulp Hobby had not made really final decisions on the health pro- gram. This one, in the end, was largely worked out at the White House. Tax Reform By contrast, the Treasury's tax reform program had been prepared with unprecedented pains and com- pleteness. Under Secretary Marion Folsom had named no less than 51 working parties, each composed of a Treasury staff member, a member of the staff of the con- gressional Tax Expert Wilbur (Continued on Page 9, Column 1) ALSOPS zines a few years later and be- an accredited war correspon- insurance for loans to re- the job. Mitchell became secretary of labor last fall, after former Secre- tary Martin P. Durkin, president, of the AFL Plumbers Union, quit in a public dispute with Eisen- hower over Taft-Hartley amend- ments. Smith introduced a bill in the Senate touching on all 14 points. The measure, calling for a vote after a strike had started, would provide that unless a majority favor continuing the strike, it "shall cease" to be a protected, concerted activity within the meaning of this act." Every committee Democrat has indicated unwillingness to adopt any .such provision, whether the would include "a scale of mort-jvote were held before or after a gage ceilings more realistically re- strike starts. And Ives termed it Ike's 8 Housing Points We shall encourage adequate mortgage financing for the con- struction of new housing for such families on good, well-located sites." 5. Modernization of National Housing Act. He said detailed plans on this, to be presented later, habilitate homes in "declining I latcd to the increased cost" of "unworkable" and a "direct swat dent for the publications durin" and five million I housing. dollars of matching funds to states I 6. Adjustment today, the students marched on t a nearby British bank and brok several windows with brickbat Then they paraded to the Spam's foreign office, where Foreign Min ister Alberto Martin Artajo appea ed on a balcony and sang with them the Falange party's anthem. 4 Austin School Explosion Suits Reach Settlement AUSTIN, Minn. (Pi Out of cour settlements totaling announced today as an outgrowtl of an explosion last February which wrecked a new addition to the Nevelri grade school. The estate of George Spicer, St Paul, received Spicer, who was working on the addition, was the only one killed in the blast Samuel Hoag received Leroy Bakken, and Everett Olson, All three Austin men were hurt. She became Hemingway's fourth I anc' cities planning to prevent (terms of government insured or wife in 1946. An earlier marriage i slums. i -m.. to Noel Monks, an Australian! 2- Conservation and improve- newspaperman, ended in divorce Game League Hits Denial of Funds For Director Salary ST. PAUL The 1953 Legis- lature's denial of funds to Bav the j ment of existing housing. He pro- 1 posed loans on older homes at comparable terms to those avail- able for new housing; a rise from to in the ceiling on in- sured loans for repairs, and a five-year repayment period instead of the present three years. 3. Housing for low-income fam- ilies. He proposed a new, experi- mental program of a long-term assistnt guaranteed mortgages. The Presi- dent said he should have limited authority to adjust mortgage cred- it terms in the light of "prevailing economic conditions" but again did not go into details. There will be a fuller discussion of this, he said, in his economic message to be submitted Thursday. 7. Secondary Mortgage Market. He said the Federal National Mortgage Association (FNMA) should be reorganized "to (at labor leaders. of permissible! Senators Purtell (R-Conn) anc Goldwater (R-Ariz) say they favor holding the strike vote before a strike actually starts, not after- I loans with low initial payment the users of the facility to Game Protective th j low-income families but gave no invest funds on a basis which details. Also, pending a test of would eventually permit the full this program, continuation of pub-i retirement of government funds lie housing with authorization secondary mortgage market -m- yvjlJI ilUUJUrlZaUUM lUi, ll-UHl 3CUUJ The resolutioni said the league new units over the next! operations, considers the action an unwarrant- four years ed, invalid and unconstitutional act 4. Housing problems of minority of interference with the adminis- trative branch of the government. E. R. Starkweather, who lost his job as assistant because of the denial, was urged to challenge the validity and constitutionality of the bill. group families. Without detailing plans, the President said "we shall take steps to insure that families of minority groups dis- placed by urban redevelopment operations have a fair opportunity to acquire adequate housing 8. Reorganization of federal housing activities. Saying the pres- ent organization of federal housing activities is "cumbersome, ineffi- the President told the law- makers he would present later a reorganization plan "to provide a better grouping of housing activi- wards. Smith said last night in a CBS radio-television interview he is not "wedded to" either a poststrike or prestrike vote, but is "wedded to exploring whether the secret ballot is being properly observed in the unions" and if not what could be done legislatively about it. Cowboy Actor's Wife Killed in Auto Crash LOS ANGELES wife of cowboy television actor Doye O'Dell was killed yesterday in a head-on automobile collision and the actor was hospitalized with ser- ious injuries. Traffic officers said Mrs. Ruth O'Dell, 33, was dead on arrival at a hospital. John Ritchie, 27, driver of the other car, suffered minor cuts on the mouth but was not hospitalized. He was not held. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and Vicinity Cloudy with occasional freezing drizzle. A little snow overnight. Tuesday cloudy, snow, sleet and a little warmer. Low tonight 5 to 10, high Tuesday 25. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. Sunday: Maximum, 43; minimum, 20; noon, 11; precipitation, none. Official observations for the 2-1 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 18; minimum, 9; noon, 18; precipitation, light driz- zle; sun sets tonight at sun rises tomorrow at AIRPORT WEATHER (No. Central Observation) Max. temp. 14 at noon today. Low 9 at a.m. today. Brok- en layer of clouds at feet, overcast at feet, visibility 10 miles with wind from the east at 4 miles per hour. Barometer 30.13 falling and humidity 74 per cent. i do not believe that agreements reached on a broad plane will be advisable or even effective. We do not see why the fate of Aus- tria should depend on that of Ko- rea, why there should be estab- lished a link between the unifi- cation of Germany and a change in the international accords gov- erning Communist China." Warning to Molotov This proposal by the French for- eign minister served direct notice for photographers of four nations and two and West Germany. They allowed 15 minutes for the picture taking. Dulles and Molotov arrived more than a half hour early to have a preliminary talk on conference ar- rangements, such as the choice of a chairman. Attention was cen- tered on any meeting of these two principals particularly in view of. the impending discussions on world atomic energy control proposed by President Eisenhower and re- ceived sympathetically by Moscow. May Cold War In a fleet of big, black limou- sines, the top world statesmen raced through the streets of di- vided Berlin to converge on the neutral grounds of a building where the four powers once met in har- mony to preside over tie ashes of Hitler's crumbled empire. The critical business of the Big Four over the next three or four weeks will be German unification, the place of Red China and Au- strian independence. In battling out such issues they will find whether the cold war can be eased or not. As motorcades for each minis- ter swept through the marble gate- way and around the oval drive, flags of all four countries whipped Erom four high white staffs before the entrance. German crowds watched as best they could from sehind police barriers. The whole area was heavily guarded by American MPs and West German police. Dulles, Eden and Bidault already lad held three preliminary talks lere to perfect their joint strategy 'or dealing with Molotov. American officials were convinced they had achieved a solid front. The Berlin conference seemed more likely to result in a strength- ining of the drive for West Euro? to Soviet Foreign Minister Vyach- pean defenses against Soviet power eslav M. Molotov that the Western than in solving the problems of powers were united in their stand I German unity, Austrian independ- against his prodding for a Big i ence and cold war tensions gea- Five meeting with Red China sit-' erally. Soviet Foreign Minister V. M. Molotov, left, arrives for the Big Four conference in Berlin today. With him is Deputy Foreign Mint ister Andrei Gromyko. (UP Telephoto)   

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