Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Winona Republican Herald: Tuesday, September 29, 1953 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - September 29, 1953, Winona, Minnesota                              Windy With Showers Tonight, Fair Wednesday An Informed Press Means An Informed People VOLUME 53, NO. 189 SIX CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 29, 1953 TWENTY PAGES Bill The Tanker Ticonderoga limped into Los Angeles harbor with a hole you could float a tug through in her middle. The huge tunnel was made by a mysterious explosion inside the ship at sea. The tanker, inbound frcm Honolulu, came in under her own power. No injuries were reported. (AP Wirephoto) Kansas City Boy, 6, Kidnaped by Woman KANSAS CITY millionaire parents of a 6-year-pld boy, kidnaped by a woman who prayed before the abduction, said today they were willing to go to any lengths to get their child back safely. They said no ransom note had been received. The boy, Robert Cosgrove Greenlease Jr., was lured from his classes in an exclusive private school on a ruse. woman gained admittance to the school, Notre Dame de Sion, by telling a nun Mrs. Greenlease had suffered a heart attack and the boy had to be taken to the hospital. She said she was the boy's aunt. The nun suggested the woman pray for Mrs Greenlease in the school chapel while she waited for the child to be called from his class. The woman walked into the chapel and knelt. On leaving the school with Bobby, Jet Averages In California 23 of 41 on Big Airliner Die in Crash Army-Chartered Craft Carrying Puerto Ricans The Streets were crowded with many persons wandering among the few possessions they were able to save by carrying them into the strees after a fire wiped out an entire block of 24 homes LOUISVILLE, Ky. death toll from the worst aviation dis- aster in Kentucky's history climb- ed to 23 today when steward-ess Dorothy Jean Bush, 32, of San Antonio succumbed. Twenty-two persons, including 20 Puerto Rico soldiers, were killed outright when a two-engine char- tered airliner nearing the end of its'journey went out of control late Mc.iday and crashed in the -center of Louisville's Standiford Field. The remaining 18 of the ship's 41 passengers remained in critical condition in three hospitals. The twin-engine C46, one of five chartered by the Army to transfer 140 soldiers from Camp Kilmer, N. J. to Ft. Knox, Ky., nearly touched ground when undetermined trouble developed. After pulling up to about 400 feet, the liner nosed down and crashed with a terrific impact. Bodies were scattered as far as 100 feet. Some were decapitated. Miss Bush was the only member of the crew of three who escaped immediate death. Resort Airlines of Miami, Fla., operator of the flight, gave her address as Miami, but hospital records listed her as from San Antonio. The pilot, Capt. Whorton Holler, 33, and his assistant, Co-Capt. John DeWitt Pickel, 31, both of San An-1 y at st. MatthewsRomanCath- tonio, Tex., were dead when am-j0jic Cathedral, bulances arrived. j Dignitaries including Vice Presi- The status of the soldiers was dent and Mrs_ and Secretary not clarified immediately since Of state and Mrs. Dulles, along their records went with them on witn friends of the sen- the transfer. 1 ator and his bride, were invited Authorities at Camp Kilmer said to attend the solemn Catholic rites in the Negro section of East St. Louis Monday. This photo was taken just after the fire was brought under control. (AP Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald) Sen. McCarthy, Miss Kerr Wed In Washington By G. MILTON KELLY WASHINGTON Joseph R. McCarthy (R-Wis) and Miss Jean Fraser Kerr, an attractive brunette who formerly was on his office staff, became man and wife they were among a group of Puer- to Ricans processed jrom overseas uniting them after a long court- ship. THERMAL, Calif. UPI A U.S. Navy pilot who flew faster than any man over a measured course today, this international speed contest technicalities for a Monday tries again time to overcome new world record. Lt. Cmdr. James averaged 742.7 miles the woman remarked: "I'm not a Catholic, but I hope God heard my prayers." The FBI declined to comment j when asked whether it was taking part in the case. B. Announcement of the kidnaping Verdm was withheld from the press and an hour in four passes over the three-kilom- eter (1.803 miles) course on the desert at the edge of the Salton Sea Monday in the Douglas F4D This was not quite fast enough to be considered a record over the speed of 737.3 made by British Cmdr. Michael Lithgow in Libya last Friday in a Vickers Super- marine Swift. That's because the air speed governing body, Federation Aero- nautique Internationale, requires a new record to be at least 1 per cent higher than the old one, which made Verdin's target 744.6. FAO Director To Be Replaced WASHINGTON LTi Norris E. Dodd, a former pharmacy clerk who rose to a position of world leadership in agriculture, evidently will be replaced as director-general of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization Secretary of Agriculture Benson announced Monday that the United States will seek election of Dr. P. V. Cardon. former administrator of the department's Agricultural Research Administration, to suc- ceed Dodd. While the other FAO members could insist on Dodd's retention, there appeared to be little likeli- hood that would occur. Dodd. whose FAO term expires late this year, has been director- general since 1048. FAO has its headquarters in Rome. WEATHER radio for three hours. Police Chief Bernard C. Brannon explained au- thorities feared earlier disclosure might result in death or injury to the child. (for reassignment and1 that quite j Miss Kerr, a native of Washing- likely some of them saw combat D, C., who was raised in the j service in Korea. j Presbyterian faith, has adopted Lt. Col. .Roscoe Buckles, staff McCarthy's religion, duty officer at Ft. Knox, said the Their vows were spoken before men had been taken to Camp KE-1 the Rev. Fr. William J, Await, mer from Puerto Rico. who also conducted the nuptial low None of the survivors could tell) mass assisted by the Rev. Fr. Au- gustine Maloney of Augustinian One witness, Carl South, a trans-1 College here. A reception at the ex- portation agent for Trans World i elusive Washington Club followed. Airlines, said the plane came into j It is the first marriage for Mc- view at about feet and de-jCarthy, 43, and for Miss Kerr, 29. scended in a normal manner. He j She is the daughter of Mrs. Eliza- said he noticed the left elevator beth Kerr and, in her college days, Greenlease, 71, is a distributor spacious field. flap on the tail drop and the plane pulled up. All at once it nosed down and crashed into the middle of the FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and Vicinity Mostly cloudy and windy with light local Communist p t showers tonight, then turning cool- er. Wednesday generally fair and cooler. Low tonight 52, high Wed- nesday 70. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum. 84; minimum, 51; noon, 74; precipitation, none; sun sets tonight at sun rises to- morrow at AIRPORT WEATHER (No. Central Observations) Max. temp. 75 at noon, rain. 59 at a.m. Noon readings sky overcast at 15.000 feet, visibility 12 miles, wind 5 miles per hour from east northeast, barometer 29.55 falling, humidity 56 per cent. for Cadillac. "I don't know why anybody would do anything like he said. "There are so many reasons why anybody would be foolish to take such a risk. It just doesn't make sense." The woman, described as chunky, about 35 years old and having reddish brown hair, left the school with the boy in a taxicab. The nun then telephoned the Greenlease home, talked with Mrs. Greenlease and learned she was not ill. Then it was discovered the boy had been taken from the school on a ruse. Later the taxicab driver, Willard Creech, 62, told police the woman and young Greenlease left his cab at a parking lot only a few blocks from the school. They got into a late model blue sedan with Kan- sas license plates and drove off. Mrs. Greenlease collapsed from strain and was under care of a physician. The Greenleases also have an 11-year-old daughter. Kremlin Orders More Tractors LONDON The Kremlin to- day ordered its war factories partially to switch over to manu- facture of farm tractors in order to help increase the Soviet Un- ion's potato and vegetable output. The decree was issued by the Council of Ministers headed by Premier Georgi Malenkov, and the Central Committee of the Soviet The plane broke into two parts I and both engines burst into flames. (Most of the survivors seemed to come out of the tail section. i Well Worth Smell, Skunk Chaser Says STURGEON BAY, Wis. There's something in the air here and its origin is as plain as white Ion black. I Police Chief Romy Londo said Monday his men had dispatched 70 j skunks in the last 10 days and there are more around. The one person who isn't too per- iturbed by the unusual invasion is dogcatcher Luke Webber, who is collecting the remains. "Skunk oil is worth a gallon, thank says Webber. The decree, broadcast by Mos- cow radio, instructed the Soviet Ministry of Defense Industry to ensure an output of tractors in 1954 and to double this the year. Farm production has become one of the most important items in Malenkov's domestic policy. To- day's action represented another phase in the government's cam- paign to boost farm output and living standards. Less than two weeks ago the government outlined a new farm policy, easing restrictions on peas- ants and reducing some farm taxes in order to spur production. was picked as a beauty queen both at George Washington and North- western Universities. Her father, William P. Kerr, died some years Reds Agree to Big 4 Meeting on Germany PARIS Soviet Union! Oct. 15 at Lugano, Switzerland, in came up today with two proposals j a conference on the German and for international conferences A j especially new Big Four power meeting on Ger- ;n soviet proposals. The Rus- many and a five power meeting sians have asked before that the including Red China to discuss the! subject of Germany be dealt with entire problem of world tensions. The two proposals were contain- ed in the latest Soviet reply to invi- tations from United States Britain and France to meet 'on ago. McCarthy and his blue-eyed bride have kept secret their honeymoon plans, except to say that a great deal of the trip will be in his native New Hoover Commission Sworn In WASHINGTON new Hoov- er government reorganization com- mission, patterned after the earlier one but with wider powers, be- comes an official entity today in oath taking ceremonies at the White House. The 12-member group headed by former President Herbert Hoover has seven Republicans and five Democratic members and half a million dollars to look for further economies in a government now costing about 70 billions a year. The new commission has a duty not held by the earlier one, which wound up its work nearly four years ago. Besides inquiring into before consideration of a treaty have also proposed a meeting of ct t i the four powers and Red China to discuss a full slate of world prob- lems. The Western powers have not gone along with either side. The Soviet note, about 10 type- written pages, was delivered Mon- day to the three Western embas- sies in Moscow and relayed to Paris, London and Washington. The Russian communication ap- peared to reject the Western in- vitation for the Big Four foreign ministers to talk about the dead- locked Austrian independence treaty at the same time they dis- cussed Germany. Instead the Sov- iets said they had not received a Western answer to their note of Aug. 28 proposing that discussions State and County Increases Total Levy City Council Chops Own Budget By Final Approval Near By ADOLPH BREWER Republican-Herald City Editor The City Council has chopped its own tax budget about under the current one, but the next city tax bill will be nearly 8 per cent higher, _ _ With committee work complete, the Council is pro- posing to levy for operation of city government and the public schools during the 12 months beginning next April 1 The comparable figure for the current year is so the proposed increase is about In mills the increase is about 9 5 However, that's just part of the bill facing the city of Winona tax- payer in 1954: The .levy by the county board of commissioners is up about 36 per cent from 000 to a gain of approximately The city taxpayer pays about 58 per cent of the county bill, so the increase to the city will be about here. The state is increasing its tax levy by about two from about 4.58 to 6.58 on homestead property, an ap- proximate hike of 40 per cent. In dollars: From about 000 to or Total anticipated tax increase on real and personal property in the city (the result of city, county and state j This year the city taxpayers are i paying about The in- I dicated percentage gain in taxes I an average 15 per cent. I These figures are unofficial, since I the exact levies will be determined 1 by the county auditor after receiv Board of Fire and Police Commis- sioners, reduced the levy for the new Central Fire Station from 000 to With money now in the fund, the commissioners may be able to start the construction during the year beginning next Ap- ril 1. Made no commitments on sal- ary adjustments, except that mon- ey is provided. City salaries are set as of May 1, Set up funds for a building in- spector who will be employed in conjunction with the adoption of a building code for the first time. The inspector will be in the engineering department. Here's a comparison of the pro- posed levies for the various funds: General Less receipts Plus 3% for uncollected taxes Total General Bond fund Fire Police Park ing all official notices from the I Band governmental units. The levies are usually announced in December. Up for Final OK Next Week Library Fire Relief Police Bath Total Council, I School General Wisconsin. McCarthy told newsmen j how efficiently a government ac yesterday they had planned to be gone four weeks, but that the staff tivity is performed, it has author- ity to study whether the activity of his Senate investigations .sub- snouid be performed by the fed- committee had persuaded him to j erai government at all. stay away no more than three, j The law creating the new corn- McCarthy has recounted that he mission directed it to Submit its tried to hire Miss Kerr the first final report not later than May 3i; time he saw her in 1945 when she 11955i Presumably preliminary re- visited a member of his staff. A i ports WJ11 be submitted before that college student at the time, she accepted the job, but changed her mind and didn't take it. It was not until 1948 that .she went to work for McCarthy as a research- er and adviser. She left the job last year to become a free lance writer and research worker. Sen. And Mrs. Joseph McCarthy (she is the former Miss Jean Fraser Kerr) are shown leaving St. Matthew's Catholic Cathedral in Washington today after their marriage. (AP Wirephoto to The Eepublican-Herald) time. The Republicans on the new commission are Hoover; Atty. Gen. Brownell; Arthur S. Flemming, de- fense mobilization director; Rep. Clarence J. Brown of Ohio; Sen. Ferguson of Michigan; Solomon Hollister, dean of the School of Civil Engineering at Cornell Uni- versity, and Sidney A. Mitchell, New York investment banker. Democrats are Sen. McClellan; Rep. Holifield of California; Rob- ert G. Storey, Dallas, dean of Southern Methodist University Law School: James A. Farley of New York, former postmaster gen- era) and Democratic national chair- man, and Joseph P. Kennedy of Massachusetts, former ambassador to Great Britain. Minneapolis Man Held in Death of Traffic Victim MINNEAPOLIS (ft Roger W. Lindahl, 34. Minneapolis, was held in jail today after police said his auto struck and killed Minnesota's on the Autrian treaty continue through diplomatic channels. The Russians also did not spec- ify where or when they thought the proposed five power conference should meet. The bulk of the Soviet note was a review of past diplomatic ex- changes between the East and the West over the German problem and world tensions. The proposals for the two parleys were contained in two terse paragraphs. TALLAHASSEE, Fla. W) Gov. Dan McCarty last night lost his gallant light against heart trouble and pneumonia. Death came to Florida's 41-year- old governor shortly before 10 p.m. in Tallahassee Memorial Hos- pital. McCarty was conscious al- most to the end and spoke to his wife and his doctor a few moments before he died. His duties passed to Senate President Charley E. Johns, 48- year-old insurance executive, who came to Tallahassee from his home at Starke to take over until a new governor is elected in 1954 to serve the last two years of Mc- Carty's four-year term. Citrus Grower McCarty, a Fort Pierce cattle- man and citrus grower, became governor in January and served less than nine months. He was the third Florida governor to die in office. McCarty was taken to the hos- pital a week ago today after a severe cold he contracted the week- end of Sept. 12 developed into pneumonia. He had suffered a heart attack Feb. 25 which put an end to nearly all his activities and from which he never recov- ered. McCarty was born at Fort Pierce and was a graduate of the University of Florida. He was a colonel in World War II n-fter serv- ing as speaker of the Florida House Gets Picture of His Car in Flames TOPEKA, Kan, Lyle, 464th traffic victim of the year in 1941 at the age of 29. Monday night. Patrolmen William Herkal andjMgvy Kenneth Maus said they saw Lin- MC" dahl drive on after his car struck Herdom Sorenson, 57, at Minne- haha Ave. and 33rd St. Lindahl was arrested two blocks away where he had stopped his machine to inspect the damage done to it. Herkal said Lindahl had a drunk- ometer test of .208 whereas a per- son is considered drunk by police. if the reading is as high as .15. The driver told officers he thought he had struck a box in the street, or a dog. School The City Council tax budget I for its own general fund, the funds I of the city boards and the public schools is up for final approval next Monday night. Last night the aldermen, meeting as a commit- tee of the whole, gave it informal approval. Here's what they did: Added to the previously designated for the con- tingent fund. That was proposed by Council President William P. Theurer for salary adjustments next April 1 and to build up a re- serve in the general fund. The city began this fiscal year with in the general fund, the lowest reserve in years. Should the Council next April 1 provide salary adjustments costing as much as an average of S25 a month, it would still have remain- ing about of the The is designated for specif- ic items. Put into a new Prog- ess Fund it'll appear as "con- struction" in the budget at the urging of Ald.-at-Large Gordon L. Weishorn and President Theurer. They indicated to the Council that they may be able to encour- age a civic-minded group to form a foundation, aiming to accept gifts and bequests for the use of major civic improvements. The is intended to show the "faith" of the city. When the foundation has ac- cumulated sufficient funds to fi- nance a project the president mentioned a swimming pool and auditorium as examples it would turn the money over to the city, which would use the funds in the Progress Fund for the same pur- pose. President Theurer, Aid. Weis-, horn and 4th Ward Aid. Joseph! to start the new Central Fire Sta- Karsina and Daniel Bambenek ton, few o her major un- wanted to start the fund off with provements anticipated in the new S5 O0fl j budget. Among the improvements, Eyi Parking Mefer Fund I them major by the jtand- the next Total City "These are not exact dollar lev- ies, but rather are mill levies. Tha exact mill value will not be known until later. The fire and police re- lief associations get one mill; the municipal band one-half of a mill; the municipal bathing beach board one-quarter of a mill, and the school building fund 10 mills. Although it exercises varying de- grees of control over other funds, the general fund is the special province of the City Council. In that fund, the budget for the engineering department is up from to the new budget including to pay a building inspector for a year, buy a pas- senger car for him and operate the office. City Engineer W. 0. Cribbs said that building inspection fees might yield as much as a year, but City Recorder Roy G. Wildgrube the Council's principal financial adviser on the budget said it would be inappropriate to anticipate first year's revenue in the first year's budget. Cribbs said that the engineering budget would be down except for the new inspector, mainly because he has not replaced two men who have left the department. There are now 13, he said. is set up for the engineering department in- cluding in salaries, and for the treatment plant, lift stations and sewer system, includ- ing for salaries. Few Major Improvements Although the Council is approving appropriation of funds to finance the current addition to Winona Sen- ior High School and appropriating Eyi Parking Mefer Fund e Decided to transfer, during jard of the years since 1945 next fiscal year, from 1. Repairing four blocks of the parking meter fund to the gen- eral fund. This has the effect of permitting the Council to levy 000 less in taxes. The will be expended by the street depart- ment for maintenance in the met- East 3rd Street. 2. Cleaning out of the Lake Wi- nona outlet ditch, The state will kick in when the proj- ect is completed. 3. Widening of one block of Man- ered area. i kato avenue. This was ap- Knocked out for new, proprjated for the current year, downtown street lighting (although i but was not done Exceptional ex- funds would be available, never- j penditures, such as the Lake Park theless, next year to do one sewer interceptor break, costing set up in the street depart-1 pernaps may involve funds ment to rebuild four of the seven designated for the widening and blocks on East 3rd street which i for new street lighting in are in poor condition because of abandoned street car tracks under the surface; levied forthecontinuing street building program somewhat under the current pace (about S21, _ rr, T-. UJ1UCJ. LilC L.U11C111 I 000 to for cutback Capital, grabbed his camera and] rushed out lor pictures when a fire truck roared up in front the newspaper's office Monday. i Arriving at the scene Lyle found I the firemen beating out a blaze in the rear seat cushion of his car. He got the picture. the current budget. 4. Storm sewer construction. 000. This is another repeat appro- priation, In three years beginning of o or cuac a appropriated agam for widlPP segments, enmg Mankato avenue between since stm sweere en i for cleaning out the Lake Winona outlet ditch. With the compliance of the used for other' purposes, prin- (Continued on Page 9, Column 6) CITY TAX BIUL   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication