Winona Republican Herald, September 18, 1953

Winona Republican Herald

September 18, 1953

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Issue date: Friday, September 18, 1953

Pages available: 20

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Publication name: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

Pages available: 38,914

Years available: 1947 - 1954

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Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - September 18, 1953, Winona, Minnesota Clearing and Cooler Tonight; Fair and Pleasant Saturday VOLUME 53, NO. 180 Read 'Green Water' Page 7 Today SIX CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 18, 1953 This Map Locates some of the critical tar- get areas for Civil Defense purposes as outlined today by the Federal Civil Defense administra- tion. Boxed segments A and B locate critical areas. (AP Wirephoto to The Republican-Her- ald) 10 Red-Held POWs Decide to Go Home Some Americans Expected to Be In Freed Group By ROBERT B TUCKMAN or more Allied prisoners who once refused repat- riation have changed their minds and will be handed over to the U.N. Command tomorrow, the Communists told the Allied Com- mand today. Some could be Americans, but the Reds did not give any nation- alities. The Communists said previously they hold about 300 South Koreans and about 20 non-Koreans who had TODAY Ike Report Planners Face Facts By STEWART ALSOP WASHINGTON Eis- enhower and his chief advisers have decided, wisely and courage- ously, to trust the people with the hard underlying facts of the na- tional situation in the nuclear age. But they have not yet firmly de- cided what must be done about these facts. As things now stand, this is the basic weakness of "Op- eration the President's otherwise admirable plan for a ser- ies of candid reports to the nation. In the short time that has passed since the President decided to go refused to return home. At least some Americans were believed to be among the score of non-Ko- reans. An announcement from the U.N. section of the Joint Military Armi- stice Commission said the Allied prisoners would be released at 11 a.m. Saturday (9 p.m. Friday Red sources said earlier this week that the 320 reluctant Allied prisoners were at Kaesong, and probably would be moved into In- dian-guarded camiy in the neutral zone this weekend. Meanwhile, South Korea's pro- vost marshal general accused the Communists of intimidating anti- Red North Korean prisoners in Indian custody and threatened to free the few thousand left in Allied camps. Taking Names Lt. Gen. Won Yong Duk said the Reds are taking names and 193 U.S. Cities as Enemy WASHINGTON the wake of Russia's H-bomb announcement, the United States government has tagged 193 American cities as probable targets of atomic attack of them as "critical." But the list "does not purport to include all possible the Federal Civil Defense Administra- tion said in issuing it last night. "For security it added, "certain targets that have national or military significance, including the atomic energy installations, have not been listed." First Disclosure It was the first disclosure of areas officially designated as prob- able A-bomb targets. It supersedes a list adopted in 1952, sent to gov- ernors and local Civil Defense di- i ciuuio

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