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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: July 21, 1953 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - July 21, 1953, Winona, Minnesota                              Showers Tonight, Fair and Cooler On Wednesday No Game Tonight, Showers at Austin VOLUME 53, NO. 130 SIX CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, JULY 21, 1953 EIGHTEEN PAGES I Weishorn Fund for Swim Poo Itv StartGOP Leaders I W fc I _ _ Ducking Hike In Debt Limit Alderman-at-large Gordon L. "VVeishorn believes that the city should start levying to accumulate a fund for a swimming pool site. He's urging that one mill be levied in the 1954-55 tax budget wnich will be up for adoption in October. "There's something in the wind now, but we got to have a site, Alderman Weis- horn declared. "We've contacted some people, and they may be willing to go along i With US." I The alderman didn't elaborate further on this statement at the City Council meeting Monday night at City Hall. I Fourth Ward Alderman Daniel j Bambenek labeled it "a thought." Weishorn declared that the 1 Council has a mandate from the I people of Winona by reason of the referendum which authorized May Force Ike To Reduce Spending Sharply By JACK BELL WASHINGTON UP) Administra- tion leaders appeared to be back- ing away today from any immedi- ate increase in the federal debt limit and Sen. Byrd (D-Va) said I this may force President Eisen- hower to make sharp spending cuts. Byrd, who has been consulting with administration fiscal leaders, said in an interview he has made it clear to them he would oppose the city to issue up to S200.000 in i any effort in this session of Con- gress to raise the present 275 bil- lion dollar debt ceiling. "If the debt limit isn't raised, the administration .soon will be compelled. to cut spending below bonds for a pool- But Second Ward Alderman Wil- i Ham S. L. Christensen labeled that a "joker vote." j (On Nov. 3, 1947, the people of Winona voted to auth- i orize the City Council to issue i in bonds for a swimming [pool.) Alderman Christensen, who per- j i suadcd the level that Congress has ap- Byrd said. "The Presi- dent has power to restrict expen- ditures on a quarterly basis and if the limit is reached, it will have to be done." National Debt The national debt now stands the Council'this summer below the statu- Screen Acfor Gary Cooper wore horn-rimmed glasses as he tackled a one-year-old bull in the best "torero" style on the ranch of Castillo de Higares, near Madrid, during a reception for Holly- wood celebrities visiting Spain. (AP Wirephoto to The Republican- Herald) Charges False, Oxnam By HARRY SNYDER WASHINGTON W> Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam told the House Un-American Activities Committee today it should "frankly admit its inaccuracies and misrepresenta- tions" about him. And he called on the committee, in a statement prepared for a hear- ing which he requested, to halt "the practice of releasing unveri- fied and unevaluated material for which the committee accepts no responsibility." "We cannot bent down the Com- munist menace by bearing false witness against fellow on Sunday and the Comn for ihe balance of the v Cites Files authorize a tot beach at the j newly-dredged Lake Winona, said that the referendum should have been on the question of "swim- ming facilities" not "swimming pool." on Lake H talked of spending another S300.000 to develop Lake Winona of channels, un- covering of more springs and things like that. "In this first dredging opera- tion" the city was only interested in pumping out mud, Alderman Christensen added. "You sot stuck in the lake Fourth Ward Alderman Joseph Karsina commented. "So you .spend more there and then they condemn the water, what tory limit, but Byrd said he thinks the Treasury probably will be able to get by until January without reaching or raising the ceiling. However, he .said that unless the President takes some drastic ac- tion to cut expenditures, they will reach 74 billion dollars in the cur- rent fiscal year and produce the 10 billion dollar deficit Byrd al- ready has forecast. "Congress cannot do anything effective about slowing down these expenditures because the depart- Noland Gillmore, 12, a scout from Grandview, Mo., dis- cussed the swapping of an autographed photograph of President Eisenhower with two scouts from foreign lands who are attending the Boy Scout Jamboree in California. Noland and his brother, Stewart, wrote the President about their plans to attend the Jam- boree, pointing out the need of souvenirs for swapping purposes. Ike sent them six autographed pictures, The boys are trading them to foreign scouts as a goodwill gesture. Left to right: George S. Papadopoulo, Alexandria, Egypt; Noland, and Olof G. Tandberg, Stockholm, Sweden. (AP Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald) I Water Rates In Line With Other Cities A comparison of Winona's old and new water rates, with those currently in effect in other Min- nesota cities, shows that despite the new approximate 25 per cent increase the city ranks low in water rates. All are figured on a monthly basis per cubic feet unless otherwise indicated: WINONA First 300 cubic feet at 50 cents, second cubic feet at third cubic feet at all over that 70 cents. WINONA First cu- bic feet, next cubic feet, all over that 90 cents, ALBERT LEA: First cu- bic feet next cubic feet. next cubic feet, next cubic feet, 90 cents; all over that 70 cents. AUSTIN: First 200 cubic feet at 75 cents per 100 cubic feet; next i 300 cubic feet at 17 cents for 100 cubic feet; next 800 cubic feet at Cease-Fire Seen Within By ROBERT B. TUCKMAN A second team of staff officers PAVMTTVTniw rum- reportedly revising the truce line bunts of from across Korea worked on into the South Korea today as Allied Communist staff and liaison offi-1 But meanwhile, South Korea s cers put finishing touches on a j Foreign Minister Pyun Yung Tai Korean armistice. All signs pointed to a cease-fire ments have a carry-over of 80 bil- within tne week- lion dollars in funds already ap-1 but there was no indication just historic signing would told newsmen his government might "change its attitude" toward obstructing a truce unless it gets preprinted Bvrd said, "The ef- 'ord t Alderman Bambenek inter- orts it is making now to cut ap- propriations will" not be felt until next year or later. "The Appropriations Committees have done the best job I have ever seen, but the only way that spending can be cut effectively is i when the i come. I Link Increase With Necessary Improvements Bond Issue May Be Required for Elevated Reservoir After Aug. 1, your water bill will be about 25 per cent higher, but there's no reason to get excited. Just consider the factors that prompted the Board of Municipal Works to seek (and obtain) approval of the rate hike from the City Council Mon- day night. Like most other price boosts, rising costs was a fac- tor. Metered water pumping costs have soared to about 83 cents per thousand cubic feet, while the minimum rate in the city is only j 14 cents per 100 cubic feet; next 70 cents, cubic feet at 12 cents per! Mayor Loyde E. Pfeiffer pointed 100 cubic foqt, all over that Sl.lO! out "water'rates have been per cubic feet, almost stationary, despite the in- FARIBAULT: First cubic creased operational costs." This is feet. next cubic feet, borne out by the fact that the last all over that, SI. (increase, and that of 33 per cent, was in 1947. Also to be considered is the pro- posed improvement pro- gram, which will be started shortly with the additional income. How- ever, the big items on the agenda would not begin for several years, until a bond issue had been made. Explain to Council Along this line, the Board issued letters to members of the Council, acquainting them with the .pro- posed improvements. The plan in- cludes an elevated reservoir on the south side of Lake Winona at a cost of and a new main from the reservoir to the ex- isting system. Vice President William Holden, OWATONNA: First cubic feet, S3; next cubic feet, next cubic feet, all over that 75c, U. S. Advantage Over Russ Jets 65-1 in 2 Months SEOUL U. S. 5th Air Force today announced a 65-to-l prompt assurances from Washing- j victory margin over Communist One group of staff officers and the liaison officers recessed with- out scheduling further meetings. Jackson also made references to the committee's files on Oxnam arid for a site_.. said they mirrored a "record of aid CJM, plenty of and comfort to the Communist front." Wieshorn) I the President to do it The Virginia senator said he re- gards it as unfortunate that the i-upiod. "He just wants to start a land we don't have to buy a site Oxnam said Jackson drew from countered. for a Alderman Christensen the committee's files a conclusion He that he held Communist sympa- i can't thies. 'If a added that dedicated funds be protected anyhow, and First Ward Alderman William F. member of the committee Ifolden corroborated this. He said can be so misled by this material, i that numerous dedicated funds Oxnam quoted Jackson as having said in a recent radio debate wmi the committee "accutnu-1' it is no wonder that uninformed had been spent last fall when the citizens are similarly he city spent about S180.000 to build the Crooked Slough dike. Holden Presides Alderman Holden, presiding in absence of President William the Methodist churchman said, i lates all pertinent information re-j H. Theurer asked that discussion "The Communists want a divided j Utive to any individual saTthat America, an America whose cili-; the only'way'by whicV in zens are suspicious of each other, an America without trust, an Am- Cal bent of any Riven individual." Oxnam the philoso- T Wln erica open to infiltration. "I believe this committee will wish to end a practice that plays into Communist hands." The committee, some of whoso can to develop natural swim- facilities, not to build pools, got a pool? Has y j crosse got a Has St. phy of an individual be determined d asked Alder- by a scissors and paste process o; wcishorn (They all have.) .4. rt t ,.1 rtrt .-i c- I n -i "i TVin j cutting out dippinas that damn" He asked why thc person "who clipped derogatory statements con- members have been critical of thc mo" failed to clip news bishop, announced in advance of reports reflecting appointments. the session that he would be per mitted to read a la-minute opening He said he had oren appom'.i'rt 10 statement without interruption of honnr and by j government and has "held the want natural water." rest offices it is in the pr.v.'or of "Yes, they go out to "I have requested opportunity to i fellow churchmen to conlVi- upon replied appear voluntarilv to secure re- i me...I am one of the presii.c-ms dress for thc damage done me by the World Council of Churches, pc the release of information in the i haps the highest honor that c: of this committee." Bishop j come to a clergyman. Oxnam said. "I deeply appreciate j Rejects Communism Eisenhower administration has not changed the system, in vogue under the former Truman admin- istration, by which Congress is asked to appropriate for two or three years ahead. The argument has been that only in that way can the administration plan in advance its purchases of such things as military items which take years to manufacture. Carry Over "There is going to be a carry- over of another 80 billion dollars in appropriated funds next July 1, just as large as the Truman carry- Byrd said. "These carry- overs have caused Congress to lose control of the budget." Instead of making direct appro- priations in advance. Byra said, he thinks Congress should return to the system it used up until a few years ago of granting contract au- Jamboree Like Movie Colony By GARBER DAVIDSON JAMBOREE CITY, Calif. (0 This big Boy Scout Jamboree campsite is beginning to look like a suburb of Hollywood, The stars are moving in and the boys love it. Dorothy Lamour and Jerry Colonna wowed them at a show yesterday in one of the camp-, fire areas of this sprawling, j meeting. thority for the departments. Under this system contracts could be let, but the departments would have Now as for La CroVser'Alderman Ito come baek to Congress with a Christensen reported, there the !seccnd of the projects city'closed up the beaches some before they would get the money vears ago, with the idea of in- ton .that Korea will be unified. Want Guarantees He said South Korea also wants guarantees from the United States on how to stop possible new Red aggression. At the truce site, things continued ito move at a feverish pace, two days.after the Communist agree- ment to go ahead with final prep- arations for signing an armistice. Marine Col. James C. Murray, who heads the U. N. staff officer team working on the truce line, had to rush from the staff officer meeting today to attend the liaison meeting as chief Allied liaison offi- cer. The Allied and Communist liai- son officers met 32 minutes and recessed without setting another meeting time. Liaison officers usually exchange communications for higher officers and arrange meetings of the full truce delega- tions. After MIG jets in the past two months. A comparative lull fell over the ground front after savage hill clashes between the Communists presiding at the Council session, agreed with the Board's contention that possible reduction of insur- ance rates is secondary to the im- portance of giving the city a de- and South Korean troops as truce preparations proceeded busily at Panmunjom. Announcement of the aerial vic- tory came with the disclosure that two U. S. Sabre jets were shot for all emergencies. It was pointed out in the letter that at present, the maximum sup- ply of water in case of electric power failure would last about six hours. A similar maximum was set in j ji on n 11 til iiia Aim uui tl u.j down Monday the first since f mecnanjcai failure in the May 17. One pilot blasted two MIGs main suction header at the John- the liaison session, Col. Murrav rushed back to the staff acre ranch. The cast for a big show in the 'main outdoor arena tonight in- cludes Bob Hope, Jeff Chandler, Danny Kaye, Jane Powell, Debbie out of the sky before he went down. In the same period. Allied Sabre pilots destroyed 131 MIGs, the Air Force said. The period included a new record 15 MIGs were destroyed. Seventy-four were shot down in June. In Tokyo, Far East Air Forces reported 27 U. S. Superforts smashed at two Communist air- fields Monday night in the Sinuiju area of far northwest Korea. Crews reported Communist night fighter and antiaircraft opposition. The B29s loosed 270 tons of bombs through an overcast but results wer_ not observed, the Air Force said. Farther south, U. S. B26 twin- bombers hit Communist At the same time, the other staff group, believed mapping the route engine to be used by neutral nations in and from the five ports of entry, on each side, announced they had j reported missions flown son St. pumping station. And in case of contamination of water in the present underground reservoir by a flood of the Mis- sissippi, the city would only have a four to six hour supply of pure water. The proposed reservoir, would supply approximately a 24-hour reserve, which could be utilized while the main system was being repaired. Favorable Comparison And even with the increase in rates, Winona compares favorably with most cities in Minnesota, ac- cording to figures compiled by Fred Dabelstein. accountant in the department office. 'igurinjr on the consumption of i positions in the Kumsong-Kumhwai gallons of water, the cost f I sector. The U. S. 5th Air Force! in Winona would be In Man- i t i l-nto with a 1Q50 population of no IlPnhiP UJ1 ccn-n oiuc. ForoTanrl Rorv recessed with no further meeting I land-based Allied planes in 24 hours j 809, the ivicuoy ana "ory i j would cc Work on B.ilding the outside, a swarm North Ko- and workmen hur An overcast tampered air strikes later in the day. Most of the ground fighting cen- 1 1- an unusual waiver of its rules. Seeks Redress to carry them out. rirnsin" the traffic at thc pool.! "When we eliminated contract hut there was so much protest; the i authority, we eliminated the an- to open two beaches mlal review of expenditures and Host our real anility to hold down "Thev Byrd remarked. Reynolds, Tim Calhoun. For a matinee tomorrow scheduled entertainers include Wil- jliam Holden, Mitzi Gaynor, James toTompTetETa building where i tered in the still-unsettled Kumsong Stewart and Bob Williams. j the wiu be signed Tney j sector of the Central Front, where Miss Lamour made a big hit, worked all through the night under j Chinese divisions ripped into Re- I with a hula dance and songs. After j floodlights put "up for them by public of Korea lines last week, the show swarms of boys followed American soldiers. i South Korean troops wrested five Allied newsmen dubbed the one-1 hills from the Chinese early today with a 1950 population of same amount of water would cost S20. Winona's monthly rate per cubic feet of water effective Aug. Alderman Holden, President Nominates Alderman, Weishorn. "Someone's going to be) EnVOV fO Soiltn Korea (Irnwned out there, and then you're coing to have thc pressure." "It wouldn't be the first was Third Ward Alderman How- the grant of this privilege. i "This might be called 'pertinent' "Such releases, made at various j he added, times for a period of nearly seven j Oxnam said he rejects Commu- ycars, have contained material, nism because of its atheism and much of which is irrelevant and repudiates the philosophy of ma-: mvnc( ard Baumann's offering Second Alderman Henry Parks said that the way to fix in the privately- never been a member of the Com- munist party. My opposition to Communism is a matter of public it publicly announce iis mista in my case; but better, that public files be closed out. and record in books, numerous articles, tee to order that my addresses and sermons..." The churchman also asked Rep. Donald L. Jackson (R-Calif) "to apologize on the floor of the House for his unprecedented and untrue statements made there concerning If Jackson does so. Oxnam ssid, "I will be the first to shake hands with him and to call the incident closed." The WASHINGTON l.fl President Eisenhower Monday nominated El- lis 0. Briggs ta be ambassador to South Korea. Briggs, 53. a native of Water- town, Mass., already is serving un- der a recess appointment. He is a career diplomat who joined the foreign service in 1925. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and Vicinity Local thundershowers late this afternoon and evening, clearing late tonight. Wednesday fair and cooler. Low Until dredging was completed in tonight high Wednesday 82. the Jake last year, the Minnesota: LOCAL WEATHER Department of Health frowned on I Official observations for the 24 reeled so as to tell the truth, it I swimming there. Now the depart- j hours ending at 12 m. today: that is all that can be dom-: that j ment says it's O.K. j Maximum, 83; minimum, 70; Alderman Holden terminated the noon, 82; precipitation, .27; sun the discussion just after Alderman j sets tonight at sun rises lo- th o Bambenek had commented, "Any-' -ified material ties- time you can win a referendum swimming gravel pits would be to "send the police out there to chase thorn off." Back to Minneapolis A d e r m a n Weishorn, getting back to Minneapolis' natural fa- cilities, said that they keep the i immaterial, some of which is false j terialism upon which Communism and some of which i5 true, but all i is based. prepared in a way capable of ere- j Oxnam .suggested thc committee ating the impression that I have appoint a subcommittee "to been and am sy.-npatheuc to Com- tigate its own files and those who munisrn, and therefore subvcrs- compiled them." He said the group ive... "I have been actively opposed to Communism all my life, 1 have mittee files and I-BI files, and if. the FBI isn't better equipped "to woulfin t be so inviting, get the facts on real subversives." "I respectfully ask the commit- file' In1 cor- i should determine how much diipii-. cutters busy in the cation there is between the com- IIc predicted that late this summer thc water in Lake Winona releases of cribed said. Bishop Oxnam he was one of the first public figures to speak out against a committee search for i Communists in tho education field i n a House I which has picked up speed under speech last March 17, assailed the j the chairmanship of bishop as a man who "served God vote, you've really got something." It was the first discussion of the long-standing pool mandate to the Council since its annual reorgan- ization in mid-April. New on the Council are Alderman Weishorn Alderman Bambenek, al- Re Yclde though the latter i previous term. morrow at AIRPORT WEATHER (No. Central Observations) Max. temp. 84 at noon Monday, min. 69 at a.m. today. Noon clouds at 000 feet, overcast at visi- bility 10 miles, wind 6 miles per hour from cast, barometer 29.72 has served a I falling slowly, humidity 82 per I cent. her. trying to shake her hand. At one point the harassed act- ress cried, "Help! After the performance five boys from the Corpus Christi, Tex., area presented her with a token of their appreciation, a black goat named Tex. The boys scrawled their names on a piece of paper for a presentation card. They were Wil- liam Armstrong Jr., David Den- ham, Roz Taylor Jr., Gene Collins and Ray Hill. There is a story behind the gen- j tie black goat. i While the boys from Texas were passing through Reno, a side trip en route to the jamboree, somebody scrawled on the side of I a special jamboree train from Idaho: "Texas was here and I gone." So the other night while the Tex- I ans had their goat tied up in a field at the jamboree somebody I painted on it, with large white let- j ters on both sides., "Idaho." The Texans claimed they didn't like this and vowed they wouldn't eat any Idaho potatoes for the dura- I tion of the jamboree. The attention of Hollywood has been attracted to the famed Ra- cine, Wis., drum and bugle corps and drill squad. Arthur Gruhl, Scout executive of the Racine County Boy Scout Council, said he received a call from film executive Jesse Lasky Sr., who saw the cine group perform on a television show emanating from the jambor- ee. story, T-shaped but failed to dislodge the in Hall." from a sixth. be: cubic feet, S1.95; feet, S1.40, and every- ing that. 90c. established on a so the boost on i from 70 to 90 Reds Icents does -Mt rcflect the true amount of increase. The average rate increase on amounts up to gallons ac- tually exceeds 25 per cent, but to the average consumer the rate may even be below that figure, with some rates running as low as 22 per cent. The new increases will be based upon the amount of water used and will simply effect an approxi- mate 25 per cent increase in water department income. A comparison of the rates now in effect (as they were revised in 1948) and the new rates, according to a monthly standard based on the size of meter shows: Meter size in in. Old in.......... in.......... 1 in........... in......... 2 in........... 3 in........... 4 in........... 6 in........... 8 in........... S .50 .70 1.00 1.65 2.30 3.00 3.60 5.30 6.95 New .75 1.00 1.50 2.50 3.50 8.00 10.50 President Eisenhower enjoyed a reunion as he posed in his White House office with his old "top Tom Blazina, left, of Chicago and his son, Capt. Tom Blazina, a jet pilot instructor at West Point. Blazina was sergeant major of Eisenhower's outfit when Ike was a second lieutenant on the Mexican border in 1916, his first command after leaving West Point. (AP Wirephoto) Boosting the income of the water department will ease the burden of future improvements. The average income of the water department during the past five years has been With the additional 25 per cent, this fi- gure would be upped to Subtracting the expenses for 1952- 53 and 10 per cent for improvements, the figure dwindles (Continued on Page 15, Column 6.) WATER RATES   

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