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Winona Republican Herald: Thursday, February 5, 1953 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - February 5, 1953, Winona, Minnesota                              Partly Cloudy Tonight, Friday Generally Fair Help Your Heart Fund Help Your Heart VOLUME 52, NO. 298 SIX CENTS PER COPY YVINONA, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 5, 1953 TWENTY-TWO PAGES s Europe to Speed Unity Fleet Still May Protect Formosa From Red Raids By ELTON C. FAY WASHINGTON will the United States Fleet Force do if Chinese Communist planes attempt to strike at Formosa? The question was sharpened today br the air of high secrecy the White House has thrown about the nature of any directive President Eisenhower has or will issue to put into effect his deci- and Air TODAY Bigger Attacks Forecast By JOSEPH and STEWART ALSOP WASHINGTON -More nonsense has been written and more drivel has been talked about President Eisenhower "unleashing Chiang Kai-shek" than should really be allowed in a civilized country. It is time to set forth the honest facts. President Eisenhower has in the 7th Fleet to cease "neutralizing" Chiang Kai-shek's stronghold on Formosa. Formosa is to be protected from invasion by the Chinese Communists. But Chiang Kai-shek is now to be per- mitted to use Formosa as a base for attacks on the Chinese main- land. This looks like, and ha-s been ignorantly hailed as, a great change in American policy. In fact, it changes nothing, for the rather simple reason that President Tru- man's order "neutralizing" For- mosa was strictly a phony in the first place. If the Asia-first Repub- licans had not got drunk on their own propaganda, they would not now be crowing about President Eisenhower "unleashing" Chiang. Sober inquiry would have reveal- ed to them that Chiang never has been leashed. Attacks Were Forbidden Attacks on the China coast orig- inating in Formosa have, to be eure, been forbidden. But Chiang Kai-shek also holds the Pesca- dores, the island of Quemoy, and one or two other strong points that are much nearer to the China coast than Formosa is. These is- sion on the function of the Seventh Fleet. The President said in his State of the Union message Monday he was "issuing instructions that the Seventh Fleet no longer be em- Hannagan, Famed Press Agent, Dead NAIROBI, Kenya W-Steve Han- nagan, the press agent who put the bathing beauty on America's front pages, died of a heart attack in a hotel here today. He had ar- rived in the Kenyan capital on Tuesday. Born in Lafayette, Ind., 53 ago, Hannagan at an early age became one of America's most colorful and famous publicity ex- popularizer of Miami Beach, Sun Valley and the Indian- apolis Speedway. Among his clients, he numbered also a host of large industrial or- ganizations, sports and entertain- ment figures. ployed to shield Communistj Hannagan He was christened China." This rescinded that part of Stephen Jerome but few people the original 1950 order by former President Truman neutralizing the situation between the Chinese Na- tionalists and the Communists by preventing either side from at- tacks. So far as is known, there has been no occasion up to now which invoked the Formosan defense in- structions. No U. S. planes or ships have had to fire upon any Red ail-craft or vessels headed for Formosa. But the threat remains and may in fact be aggravated if the Com- munists choose to use the Eisen- hower order as a pretext for of- fensive action across the For- mosan Strait. It could have the effect of spreading at least the air- sea phase of the Korean War far down the coast. The prospect seems remote that Chiang Kai shek's forces can launch any substantial action, either by air or sea, against the Red-held mainland before late next spring. However, Sen. Wiley (R-Wis) told his colleagues yesterday he anderstands Chiang will use planes he is getting from the U. S. to attack a vital north-south rail line on the mainland. "If Chiang has any strength at all, and he's getting airplanes, he will disrupt that said Wiley, foreign relations committee chairman. If Chiang wanted to gamble, he could send part or all of his rela- tively small air force of piston- engined fighters, fighter bombers and few medium bombers of World War II vintage on strikes against his enemy. But a few hours' flight north- ward in Manchuria are about Red MIG15 jet fighters. Intercep- tion of the slow, propeller-driven knew it became a newspaper reporter on the Lafayette Morn- ing Journal at 14. During his two lands, being nearer, are much I planes by Soviet-made jets Price Controls Being Dropped, Meat Released Ceilings to Go Off Stoves, Other Appliances By WARREN ROGERS JR. WASHINGTON Ufi President Eisenhower's quick-moving cam- paign to put the country back on a free-market economy was shift- ing today into a third ing of price controls on the things people buy. His latest step, taken yesterday, was to knock out the Defense Production Administration, main- years at Purdue University, he was stay Of the Truman administra- tho nit-ir nnr] itrr'ntft i tion's industrial controls program. The a g e n c y's functions were turned over to the Office of De- fense Mobilization. Dismissal notices went out the day before to all or so em- ployes of the federal boards which have controlled wages and salar- ies. editor for metropolitan papers as well. When the Indianapolis Star offered him a job as sports writer, he quit college in 1919. He opened his own publicity of- fice at 25. Employed to promote Miami Beach, he launched the flood of wintertime bathing beauty pictures which became a sure space-winner in newspapers. Grateful Miami Beach paid him a year for his services. His clients in later years in- Soon and probably tomorrow, a price official said, an order now in preparation will decontrol prices of meat and a lot of other con- sumer items, such as canned fish eluded a variety of heiresses and I and canned meat, furniture and well-known figures. He was credit- j small electrical ware. Other Orders Coming Within two weeks, the official said, a follow-up order will call off controls on such major appli- ances as stoves, refrigerators and washing machines. Price Administrator Joseph Freehill acknowledged that a de- control order, including meat, will be touched on in a statement this week. He. said it is part of Eisen- hower's program, revealed public- ly in his State of the Union mes- sage to Congress' Monday, to "eliminate controls in an orderly manner and to terminate special agencies no longer needed for this purpose." Eisenhower said then he would ed with publicizing Gene Tunney as the prizefighter who read Shake- speare. Labor Heckles Churchill on Formosa Plan LONDON Prime Minister. hurchill's Conservative govern- 1 ment faced sharp heckling from Germany's Chancellor Konrad Adenauer welcomes Secretary of State John Foster Dulles, left, and Mutual Security Director Harold Stassen, right, on their arrival at Bonn today from London. The U, S. statesmen, on a swift flying tour of Europe, facei a full schedule of conferences with German and Allied leaders in the Atlantic Pact capitals of Europe on the ticklish European de- fense army program. In background, with glass- es, is German Undersecretary of State Walter Hallstein. (AP Wirephoto to The Republican- Herald) eek of pnce-wage-mater- the Labor opposition in Parliament ioday over the new U. S. policy to deneutralize Formosa. Deputy Laborite Leader Herbert ials controls, except for scarce items needed for defense, when authority for them expires April 30. more useful bases than Formosa proper. They were not at any time included in President Truman's neutralization order. And Chiang has been using these islands as bases for attacking the China coa.st for a considerable period, up to the could cause serious damage. A race is now being made to Office' for three weeks the news modernize the Nationalist Air 1that President Eisenhower planned Force. Perhaps 50 or so World War !to   S, decision to deneutralize the Formosa Strait and open the entire Red coastline to Nationalist raids. June Haver Ends Film Life To Become Nun HOLLYWOOD (5V-Actress June Haver turned her back on movie- land's tinseled brilliance today to become a nun. The 26-year old blond dancing star, whose salary rose to a week but whose career also brought her per- s o n a 1 tragedy, ended months of rumors about her intentions by is- suing a poignant last dis- statement night. Without closing her whereabouts, nor where and whenp'" she will enter a convent, Miss1 Haver telephoned Miss Haver the statement to her studio and asked that it be distributed public- ly. It said: "To all my friends: "Now that I am about to do something that some of you per- haps wiE find it difficult to under- stand, I have tho'ught it weE to make a public statement.' Sister of Charity "I am going away to prepare myself, by several years of prayer and study, for something I have jeen contemplating for the past two years. I am determined to be a Sister of Charity, with the grace of God and the approval of His ihurch, and to consecrate my life to the service of God in His .sick and in His children. "To do this wEl take more ability than I- have. That is why I am [oing to 'prepare myself in a no- Continued on 12, Column 4.) JUNE HAVER 2 Teen-agers Found Jnconscious in Car WAUSAU Wausau teen- ges who reportedly intended to be married without parental consent vere found unconscious Wednes- ,ay in a parked auto fiEed with arbon monoxide fumes from a .efective muffler. Miss Barbara Klimek, 18, and Harlen Merdahl, 19, were revived t a hospital but were in serious ondition. They were found by a asserby on a residential street n which the auto was parked. Taft Helping Ike Get Power To Reorganize By JOHN CHADWICK WASHINGTON a strong assist from Sen. Taft President Eisenhower seemed as- sured today of getting the same government reorganization powers that ex President Truman used frequently. In an about face, the Senate Government Operations Committee voted yesterday to accept a House- passed bill giving Eisenhower au- thority to reshuffle executive agen- cies and functions. The measure, to be taken up in the Senate tomorrow, would extend for two years beyond April 1 a law providing that reorganization plans submitted to Congress by the Pres- ident become effective in 60 days unless vetoed by a constitutional majority in either the Senate or the House. A constitutional majority is a majority of all the members 49 in the Senate, 218 in the House Taft, who was Eisenhower's chief rival for the GOP presidential nomination last year, went to Dat 'or the House bill at a session of he government operations com- mittee called to reconsider its ear- lier stand in favor of making it easier for Congress to block re- organization proposals. Taft said that not only had hower made it clear he wanted as much authority as Truman had been given to revamp government agencies but that the new Repub- lican President felt that to deny him this power would indicate "a kind of lack of confidence in him" by Congress. Previously the Senate committee, like the House Government Opera- tions Committee, had recom- mended a bill under which presi- dential reorganization plans could be killed by a simple majority of either the Senate or the House as few as 25 votes in the Senate or 110 in the House. Pilots Bag Red Planes Blind in New Night Fighter SEOUL Uft Pilots of a radi- cally new U. S. jet night fighter plane the Skynight have shot down Red planes in Korea without even seeing them, the Marine Corps said today. The new Marine plane, the twin- jet F3D built by Dougla.s Aircraft Co., made a secret appearance in Korea several months ago. It is equipped with an intricate radar system which locks the plane on a target in darkness. A Leatherneck pilot who recently destroyed a Communist plane re- ported he didn't see the Red air- craft until it fell in flames from his machine gun bursts. Red pilots who may have caught Urges Nations To Discontinue Old Rivalries Warns Britain Unity Progress Must Be Immediate BONN, Germany (SI U. S. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles today called upon continen- tal Europe to put away its "old dangerous rivalries" and join quickly in armed union to "provide the indispensible cornerstone of a strong Atlantic community." The secretary and Mutual Se- curity Director Harold E. Stassen flew here from London, where they reportedly left behind a warning to British leaders that concrete progress must be made within 75 days toward creating a European defense army including German troops or America may reduce its aid program. After a brief preliminary meet- ing with Chancellor Konrad Aden- auer, they swung into a series of conferences with German and Al- lied leaders which will virtually fill their 21-hour stay here. Dulles read a brief formal state- ment to the press after his first chat with Adenauer. He praised the 77-year-old chancellor as "one of the great postwar statesmen who has the vision to move forward and realize the possibilities of the future." Dulles said he and Stassen were making this fact-finding tour of six nations which have signed the treaty to create a European de- fense army because "we these countries stand on the thresh- hold of a great evolutionary change which will supplant national rival- ries with unity." The 75-day period of which Dulles reportedly warned British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and Foreign Secretary Anthony well as Italian and French government put the deadline on April 20. In a written statement given to reporters at the London airport, Dulles said the Americans and the British "are in accord as to our basic aims of peace, security and economic well being and stability." "As regards the means of at- taining the he continued, "our differences of opinion are very minor as compared with the large area of agreement. We leave confident that our two govern- ments will, as in the past, work together in cordia] co-operation." As, in his Paris and Rome talks, Dulles reportedly made it clear to the British that unless progress is made on the six-nation army pro- ject within the 75 days, the U. S. Congress may refuse to pour- any more aid billions into this part of the world. None of the participating coun- tries have yet ratified the Euro- pean army treaty, although Ade- nauer said Sunday the issue would be placed before his Parliament the week of March 9. The proposal faces the implacable opposition of the 'West German pnd most powerful political. party in the country. Britain does not plan to become a full member of the European army but has forwarded to Euro- pean Defense Community members a proposal for linking British units with the projected defense force in case of emergency. Dull.es is known' to have urged even closer British co operation with the 'plan. West German-Socialists reported that party chief Erich Ollenhauer would tell Dulles during a sched- uled private talk today that the EDC treaty and its related Ger- man Peace Contract with the Allies are unacceptable to the So- cialists. The Socialists complain that Germany would not have equal rights with other nations under the projected treaties and that the bulk of the Germans oppose them. They say that a new approach to Mos- cow must first be made to unite the divided country. If the Rus- sians rebuff such a move, the So- cialists argue, then a new basis for German co-operation with the West must be found. An alliance of the free nations of Europe, including Britain and the Scandinavian countries, is pref- erable to the EDC plan in Socialist eyes. a glimpse of the Skynigbt never got back to tell about it, the Ma- rine Corps said. Unofficial reports said the new jets have destroyed six night-flying Communist MIGs and one propeller-driven aircraft. The U. S. Air Force announced it also has a new jet night 'fighter with the same equipment operating in Korea. Check Master EDEN VALLEY, Minn. W check, who's got In Eden Valley, the answer is Clarence McCarney, just named financial secretary of the Chamber of Commerce here. But he already holds similar posts with the local Bowling Association and the Eden Valley Booster Day fete. Then, of course, he signs his own personal cheeks. y In his spare time, McCarney gets in a lick or two as village assessor.   

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