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Winona Republican Herald: Friday, October 17, 1952 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - October 17, 1952, Winona, Minnesota                              Cloudy Tonight And Saturday; Warmer Saturday BE SURE TO VOLUME 52, NO. 206 SIX CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 17, 1952 EIGHTEEN PAGES U. S. Protests Russ Attack on Lost B29 WASHINGTON un The United Whereas the Russians have con- States charged today in a note to ig-g f Moscow that Russian planes made said the attack actuauy occurred a "wanton and unjustifiable at- j some six miles from the Japanese tack" on the American B29 plane j island of Hokkaide and 32 miles missing off Japan since Oct. 7. from Russian-occupied Yuri Island. The note demanded compensation. The sharply worded U. S. note Payment is in order, the U. S. j advised Moscow 'to consider the Alarm Out Kidnaper said, both for the loss of the plane and for tile lives of any of the crew of eight who may have per- ished. The U. S. declared the B29 was on a routine flight off the northern end of Japan, was entirely un- armed and its officers were under explicit orders to remain within Japanese territory. grave consequences which can flow from its reckless practice, if per- sisted in, of attacking without pro- vocation the aircraft of other states." It rejected the Soviet claim, made in a Russian note of Oct. 12, that the bomber was over Soviet terri- tory and opened fire on two Soviet I fighter planes before it disappeared 'Wishing Well' Thieves Sought BLUE MOUNDS, Wis. ifl iff's officers were on the lookout today for thieves who took an es-1 timated from a wishing well in Eave of the Mounds. P. H. Hanneman, cave manager, j reported that a window had been smashed by thieves to gain entry' to the well. The money is collected each summer and turned over to. charit- able and fraternal organizations for helping needy children in the area. I'm My Own Man, Adlai Tells Voters President Denounces New Immigration Bill For Top Job, Warren Says By WARREN ROGERS JR WASHINGTON wi- President Truman said today Gen, Dwight D. Eisenhower has gone "morally blind" and is willing to accept Nazi practices 'although he took a leading part in liberating Europe from their domination." In a scathing denunciation of the McCarran immigration bill, passed by Congress June 27 over his veto, Truman said it adds up to "the philosophy of racial superi- ority developed by the Nazis." Among those who voted for the bill, Truman said, were Republican Sen. Richard M. Nixon of Califor- the GOP candidate for vice Republicans Sen. William E. Jenner of Indiana and Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy of Wisconsin, running for re-election this year. Truman noted that Eisenhower, as the Republican presidential can- TODAY Tight Race Indicated In Texas By JOSEPH ALSOP DALLAS, Tex. Gen. Eisen- hower's triumphal invasion of Tex- as has spot-lighted the opening of a new epoch. Voting Republican, in national elections at least, has at last become respectable in the South. Many of the present Eisen- hower supporters in this state al- so supported Gov. Thomas E. Dew- ey or joined the Dixiecrats four years ago; but they were pretty shamefaced about it then. Now they are proud, almost to the point of blatancy, of their stand for Ike. There is such a thing in polit- ics, however, as being too respect- able. The visitor from the shabby- genteel East, although bewildered by the sheer vitality and dynam- didate, has endorsed these men, I and added: j "The Republican candidate for the presidency can not escape re-1 sponsibility for his endorsements. I He has had an attack of moral blindness, for today, he is willing to accept the very practices that identified the so-called 'master race' although he took a leading part in liberating Europe from their domination." Message to Be Road The President's remarks were in an address prepared for reading by Howland H. Sargeant, assistant secretary of state, at the mobiliza- tion conference of the National Jewish Welfare Board in Washing- ton, In the speech, Truman apolo- gized for not appearing in person to deliver it. He could not do this, he said, because he is now on a whistle-stop campaign tour through New England in behalf of the Dem- ocrats' Stevenson-Sparkman tick- et. At Hartford, meanwhile, Connec- ticut's Republican Gov. John Lodge quoted Truman as saying in a speech there last night that Re- publicans were "against the immi- gration of Jews and Catholics." Lodge said this was "the most distressingly false statement which has ever been uttered by a high public official of this nation." He said Republican administrations had welcomed millions of people from all over Europe. In his speech to the Jewish Wel- fare Board, Truman said he was proud of his part in the creation of the state of Israel and hoped his successor would continue tech- nical assistance to that Near East country. He praised the Displaced Persons Act, which expired last June, and said it had made Amer- ica stronger in character and skills. Fought All Way Then the President turned to the MeCarran Act, which he said Con- gress passed after he asked for leg- islation to admit more dis- placed persons over the next three years. "Although Warns Nation Must Reject GOP Ideas Of Isolationism By The Associated Press California's Governor Earl War- ren says that Dwight D. Eisen- hower is the best qualified man in the U. S, to lead the nation toward world peace. Addressing an estimated Minnesotans in a swing from St. Paul, across the Iron Range to Duluth, Warren repeated before four audiences that the Republican presidential candidate is "more capable than any other man of giving us the leadership we need." In St. Paul, he quoted the Demo- cratic campaign slogan, "We never had it so good." "But it isn't so good, what with fighting one war now and being confronted with a third the governor said. Dinner at Virginia By JACK BELL SAN DIEGO, Calif, Ad- lai Stevenson declared today that the "best chance for a just and peaceful world" hinges on the re- sults of next month's election. Assuming a humble role in his battle with Gen. Dwight D, Eisen- hower, the GOP nominee, the I1U- 1 nois governor said in an address I prepared for an early morning ral-j jly here that "no man on earth can truly measure up to the awful re- I sponsibilities of the presidency." 1 But while he said he was humble in the face of the fact that the voters might make him the next president, said he is not uncertain nor hesitant. "At least my mind is my own mind and I am my own he declared in an obvious refer- ence to his charges that Eisen- hower has surrendered leadership in the Republican party to Sen. Robert A. Taft of Ohio. Peace Involved Asserting that the contest be- tween the two major political par- ties this year involves "not just your prosperity but the best chance for a just and peaceful Stevenson declared: "I know that unless we reject .the Republican ideas of isolation- ism, we will lose the free and with it our struggle for peace." The Democratic nominee was At a dinner meeting in Virginia, wading up m San Diego a crucial Warren said Eisenhower had prov- campaign for California s vital 32 ability as a leader by win- electoral votes His next stop in victory for the free nations today's crowded schedule was Fort u. u.c world in World War II. He Worth, Tex after a six-hour flight told the audience that Democrats eastward. From there, Stevenson were accusing the general of being (Planned to go to Grand Prairie a "designing man" in seeking the i and thence to Dallas for a major presidency. j speech tonight. "If the' general is the conniver In San Diego, the Illinois gov- they say he Warren said, "he I ernor continued his vigorous as- name of a the bill bears the Democratic senator (Pat McCarran of I fought him on this bill all the way j uetter I and I going to keep right could have had the Democratic nomination on a silver platter four years ago. But he was too smart for the Democrats. He had his own ideals and is now running, with those -ideals, as the Republican candidate." Continuing in the same vein be- fore a Hibbing audience, Warren said: "Not so long ago, your own Democratic senator (Humphrey) said Eisenhower is the only man to lead this country out of its diffi- culties. Someone, an even higher level Democrat, said the general deserves anything within the gift of the American people. Even Better Today "Now if Eisenhower was that good four years ago, he is even on Eisenhower as a "disap- pointing" candidate who has given his endorsement "to the whole iso- lationist team" of-Republicans. Many Disappointed "I know for a fact that in doing Abductor Holds Duluth Bride Nearly 3 Hours Fires Shot At Motorist After Car Theft Theatrical Figures join with composer Irving Berlin, at piano, to sing a song about Republican presidential candidate Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, second from left, before his appearance at the annual Alfred E. Smith Memorial Dinner at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York Thursday Taft Discovers People Like Ike, Predicts Victory WASHINGTON Robert A. Taft said today he has' found "the great majority of the people really do 'like Ike'" and predicted Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower would DULUTH, Minn, (in A two- state alarm was out-today for a gunman who abducted a newlywed Duluth bride Thursday night and later fired on a motorist after stealing his car at gunpoint. Mrs. Edward R. Rot was hos- pitalized to determine to what ex- tent she was harmed in her two- hour enforced ride with the man, who stole the Rot auto and forced Rot from the machine. Rot told police, the man ap- peared at his home about 7 p.m., asking if he knew of any rooms to rent. Before Rot could answer, the man forced his way in, pro- duced a pistol and demanded that the husband and wife get into their car, Indian Point He ordered Rot to drive to In- dian Point on the Lake Superior shore below Duluth, there or- dered the husband from the ma- chine and drove away with the wife. The Rots were married Oct.4. Shortly before 10 p. m., Mrs. Rot and her abductor appeared at the William Zuck home, about a mile from where the Rots live. The man told Zuck he was out of gas and asked if Zuck had a car. Noting that Mrs. Rot was crying, Zuck invited the couple in and the woman used a telephone to call her mother, Mrs. Ann Reindl. While the conversation was on, the ab- ductor left, saying he would try to get some gas in Morgan Park. By JAMES DEVLIN Mrs, Rot, freed from the menace EN ROUTE WITH EISENHOWER Dwight D. Eisenhower Of the gun, told Zuck, "He's going camoaiEned on the Eastern Seaboard today after a stepped-up attack to kill me." Zuck called police Truman administration and blasts at "godless Commu- nism.' night. Standing, ieft to right, are: gomery, the general, Dorothy Fields, Bill Gaxton and New Hampshire's Gov. Sherman Adams, an Eisenhower campaign adviser. Seated beside Ber- lin is actress Helen Hayes. (AP Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald) Ike Ignores Adlai To Blast Truman With President Truman verbally slugging at him, the Republican residential candidate is hitting back at the Democratic handling of, by street after taking the to a hospital. Riverside Section A short time later, Omund Seg- S; Wisrs st Wilmington, Del., by train and then win the election. I work his way back in a motor The Ohio senator, who was caravan through New Jersey in chief rival for the bis second visit to that, state in Eisenhower's Republican presidential nomma- so, he" has disappointed a lot ofjtion, said that after three weeks Republicans, disappointed them j Of campaigning he had become Stevenson declared. I convinced Eisenhower's "very He has said previously that personal popularity" would senhower is widely known and that be a key factor in a GOP triumph, he Stevenson, faces an uphill bat-1 Writing in Pathfinder magazine, tie'in getting the public acquainted J Taft said that if Eisenhower wins, with his views on major issues of I "he will carry with him both the the day. i House and Senate." now. His chief asset is together, ism of the Texas scene, cannot because' the spirit of it is contrary I help but suspect that the new to everything America stands j j" Duluth the Californian said Southern Republicanism may suf-! Truman uumln< .tne   5 inches and 1952 Red casualty tolls. _ i weighjag 3DOut 140. Although the and the The Eighth army said U. S. troops since Tuesday morning had killed or wounded Chinese on Triangle Hill, north of Kumwha. Communists littered the frost- height He added, however, that Eisen- hower could win without New York "particularly if he can add Vir- ginia, Tennessee and Texas to his column, which I believe to be very likely." Taft said an important Eisen- hower asset was that he started the campaign "without any ene- "What Are You doing was the friendly question asked when the campaign paths of Vice President Alben Barkley, left, and Gov. Earl Warren of California crossed at the Minneapolis airport. With Warren is his daughter, Virginia, (AP photo) of Jogjakarta. Several thousand persons mobbed the residence of the Neth- erlands high commissioner, tore down the Dutch flag flying there and ripped it to shreds. Government tanks and artillery rolled into the heart of Jakarta as some demonstrators congre- gated around the parliament build- ing at daybreak and demanded the legislature dissolved. Wearing apparel of many of the rioters and some the banners they carried indicated the Commu- nists had a part in the disturbance. The parliamentary censure reso- lution yesterday demanded reor- ganization of the young republic's Defense Department and armed forces, which the 40-year-old Sul- tan headed. As a result, the seven- fense to any large section of the people because he has not had to take a position on many domestic controversial issues during the i inai is uic airlift to save Berlin, and, finally, where A p correspondent Milo [Korea, which unhappily, still goes Fa-rneti Reds launched on." six futile assaults between 8 p.m. He said it would be unfair to Thursday and dawn today. He said say that there could be a perfect TJ. S. defenders killed or peace when "the godless doctrine j wounded 630 Reds. j Hard Fighting ROK'j j Hard-fighting South Korean sol-1 diers, backed by tank and mortar fire, repulsed about 700 Reds who commands the of Communism" strength it does. "What we want to know, he said, "and what we have a right to demand is: Why have we not simultaneously attacked Sniper a better peace than we have? Be- Ridge, an Allied -controlled hill two cause on (Continued on P.ge 15, Column 3) j Taft wrote that "the main reason i which makes me feel confident of a Republican victory is the deep- seated resentment against the Truman administration and all its works." 1KE Wisconsin Central Airlines Buys Lake Central Line _ I I _ Stalin Kept In Top Jobs By EDDY GILMORE and THOMAS P. WHITNEY MOSCOW UH The Soviet Com- munist party named its new high i command today and kept Joseph MADISON of Lake Cen- Stalin firmly in all the top jobs. tral Airlines to Wisconsin Central month-old government of Premier AMines was approved by stock- Wilopo was expected to resign. of the two corporations to- The vote stemmed from charges by aa -army colonel that the Sultan had been inefficient and pushed policies contrary to the country's interests. I day. Lake Central Airlines now op- erates Ohio. in Indiana-, Michigan and The stockholders ratified a con- tract made by directors of the New Prague School Robbed of NEW PRAGUE, Minn. bur- glar who used tools from the indus- trial arts classroom in the New Prague High School to open a safe in the office of E. L. Schmidt, high school superintendent, escap- ed Wednesday night with in cash. Scott County authorities were investigating the robbery today. 1 firms not disclosed If the transaction is approved by the Civil Aeronautics Board, Wis- consin Central lines will operate in Indiana, Michigan and Ohio as well as in Upper Michigan, Illinois, Minnesota and Wisconsin, where it. currently supplies service. In another action, WCA stock- holders voted to amend articles of incorporation to increase its com- mon stock from to shares, unlisted. weather was cold, Mrs. Rot was forced from her house without a hat or coat PTA Undertakes 'Grass-Roof Drive For More Teachers DULUTH, Minn, The Minne- sota Congress of Parents and Teachers is undertaking a "grass roots" campaign to recruit more public school teachers. Closing their annual meeting here Thursday night, delegates voted to have the 843 local units in ths state take part in the drive to attract highest for a single week j more young people into teaching. since last included 5.868 j The congress, in a resolution on killed wounded and 60 cap- i the subject, said too much puo- tured. ilicity given to alleged underpay- The report said most of these I ment of instructors had driven casualties were inflicted at White I students into other professions. Horse Mountain, more than 15 i Delegates also asked that all PTA the other side of the miles east of Triangle. Red casualties were mounting at g rate approachjng bloody week of Oct. of 8-14, which the Eighth Army estimated cost i the Communists soldiers. The rniSes west of Triangle Hill. Communist casualties the first The party's new Central Com- mittee announced election of a Presidium of 25 members and 111! alternates to replace the old Polit-1 week of October were listed as killed, wounded and captured, making a total of for the first two weeks of the month. Navy warplanes and Allied ar- tillery pounded Papa-San Mountain, overlooking Triangle and Sniper seeking to cut off Red re- supervise party administration. Stalin was named head of both key groups. Also elected was a new chairman of the party Control The Red assaults weakened no- ticeably. A. P. correspondent John Fujii said South Korean fire, sup- ported by tanks and mortars, was so intense that the Chinese were Thp salp nricp was J, SO intense mat uie wcic I Committee which has charge of unable to dose in for hand-to-hand tnai-tv rlisrinlinp. niHoo Tho party discipline. The Presidium is more than twice the size of the old Politburo of 11 members and one alternate. Replacing the Politburo, it will direct the Committee work of between the the Central party's quadrennial full sessions and will 'also take over the duties of the old organization bureau dealt with party organiza- tion. fighting on Sniper Ridge. The Re public of Korea (ROK) troops set off explosives sealing caves where Reds refused to surrender. Chinese soldiers last night and early today unsuccessfully attacked two other U. N. held ger Ridge, west of the Pukhan i members take a stand against li- quor advertising and "the insid- ious propaganda of those motion pictures and shows which refer to the use of liquor as if such use were normal and desirable." WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and Vicinity Partly- cloudy tonight and Saturday. Low tonight 23, high Saturday 50. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 40; minimum, 24; noon, 36; precipitation, .08 (1 inch sun sets tonight at sun rises tomorrow at AIRPORT WEATHER (Wis. Observations) Max. temp. 37 at p. m. Thursday, low 23 at a. m, to- River on 'the central front, and day. Noon no ceil- Iron Horse Mouotain, east of the Chorwon valley, on thes west-cent- ral sector. ing, visibility 15 miles, wind 3 miles from north, barometer 30.42 rising and humidity 80 per cent.   

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