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Winona Republican Herald: Thursday, October 16, 1952 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - October 16, 1952, Winona, Minnesota                              Rain or Snow Tonight, Continued Cold Htm campaigns GIVE ran ro.AlL! VOLUME 52, NO. 205 Ike Ready for 10-Day Drive In New England Bids for Political Rebellion in Southern States By DON WHITEHEAD NEW YORK D. Ei- senhower pointed his hard-driving campaign toward the Eastern Sea- board today with scarcely a pause in the rush that has carried him to the Pacific Coast and back. He flew into New York last night from a journey that started Sept. 30 and carried him through 28 states in 16 days by train, plane and automobile. He has scheduled a grueling campaign for the days remaining before the election Nov. only Saturdays and Sundays off in the whistle-stopping. He appeared to be standing the grind with sur- prising bounce. With a good night's rest behind him, he will leave at noon today by automobile for Hackensack and Paterson, N. H. He will speak to- night at the Alfred E. Smith Memo- rial Foundation dinner at the Wal- dorf-Astoria Hotel here. Ten-Day Sweep Tomorrow he will set out on a 10-day concentrated sweep by train and plane into the New England states, New York and Pennsylva- nia. He is expected to concentrate his time and energy in the remain- ing days before election in the vote- heavy states of the East and Mid- west. Yesterday, he made his final bold bid for support in the Solid South by attempting to stir politi- cal rebellion in Texas, Louisiana and Tennessee. In Ft. Worth, Dallas, Shreveport, Memphis and Knoxville, large and noisy crowds turned out to wel- come him and heighten GOP hopes that Dixie isn't as solid as it has been in the past. He said the opposition's "big guns and little guns" were telling "plain lies" in saying his election SIX CENTS PER COPY WINONA. MINNESOTA. THURSDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 16, TWENTY-TWO PAGES The First Heavy snowfall of the season hit Hibbing and the Minnesota Iron Range Wednesday. Judy Dumas, left, and Diane Tawyea, both of Hib- bing, are pictured doing some fancy sketching on a snow-covered car. Five inches of snow fell at International Falls, about three inches at Hibbing, Detroit Lakes and Virginia. (AP Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald) BREAD, BUTTER ELECTION _____ Taft Blisters Truman Warns Voters Administration Much at Stake With Attacks i By ERNEST B. VACCARO EN ROUTE WITH TRUMAN THROUGH CONNECTICUT w-Presi- that '-bread and; By RAY CARPENTER Adlai Drive Shows Signs of Catching Fire Accuses Ike of Playing Both Sides In California By JACK BELL WITH STEVENSON IN CALI- FORNIA Adlai E. Steven- son's campaign showed signs of catching fire today as he lashed out with fresh vigor against Dwight D. Eisenhower's "crusade." Flushed with the enthusiasm of ihis biggest and noisiest campaign San Francisco last Democratic presidential nominee accused Eisenhower of at- tempting to ride two political hors- es in California. Scoffing at what Eisenhower calls his Stevenson said his Republican opponent had felt it necessary to take different posi- tions in different states. The Illi- nois governor declared in a speech prepared for delivery from the Capitol steps in Sacramento: "Here in California he has tried the delicate job of being both a Warren Republican and a Nixon Republican." Endorses Warren Stevenson repeated a virtual en- dorsement of Republican Gov. Earl endorsement that won applause from a Democratic audi- ence which bulged San Francisco's Cow Palace. The same audience, the most re- sponsive he has had in his travels, booed lustily when he mentioned the name of Eisenhower's vice presidential running mate, Sen. Richard M. Nixon of California. Stevenson said last night that Nixon had proposed an investiga- tion of the "extravagant charges" made against Gen. George C. Mar- shall, Eisenhower's good friend, I adding: "As for Nixon, we would take his ran With B Break s SALT LAKE CITY Ui-Sen. Rob- j enthusiasm for investigation and t u i r i A f1 1111 ixuu" i "plain lies" in saying his election dent Truman ,0id New England voters today that their "bread and Utah i disclosure more seriously if he would threaten another depression, and their chance for world peace are tied up in the 1952 election, j ert A. Taft of Ohio stumped Utah c lete job on threaten the social gains that have And he renewed his onslaught on Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower by j Wednesday in an effort to unite his been made, and bring an end to the GOP presidential nominee has abetted Sen. Joseph R Tt T _ _ t Kif-llO public power development. In his two stops in Tennessee, he took pains to declare his election would not "impair the effective working out" of the Tennessee Val- ley Authority program. Praises TVA In Oregon last week, the general spoke out in opposition to federal authorities as the means of devel- oping river basin resources. He proposed instead a co-operative program in which local, state and federal officials would work out i the problems together. I Court of Appeals ruled today that Speaking in Memphis, however, I mere membership in an organiza- he praised the TVA as a "great experiment.'1 He said: "TVA has served rural areas (Continued on Page 12, Column 3.) IKE Federal Employes Can't Be Fired As Subversives WASHINGTON U. S. of Appeals ruled today that nere membership in an organiza- tion listed by the attorney general as subversive is insufficent for fir- a government worker. McCarthy's "scurrilous, big-lie at- tack" on Gen. George C. Marshall. Truman derided the Republican time for a and declared, "No party is entitled to power because it lost too many elections in the past." preconvention supporters behind Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, Re- publican presidential nominee _, -illnciAn tn explanation of an fund raised by Californians to pay some -JUJJ.l_o..H csiutiii-ieti i IH15UU My f He delivered blistering attacks j Oj the senator's expenses, upon administration foreign policy, j gtevenson said in an address "corruption in government" and defended the Taft-Hartley Labor Law as an act to "keep the gov- "I know many a baseball fan crnment from interfering in collec- who was rooting for the Brooklyn tjvc bargaining." Dodgers in the World Series just faft was welcomed warmly by because the Yankees had won too.j good-sized crowds in Ogden, on the many times." the President said, j campus of Utah State College at "It was time for a change. Logan and in Salt Lake City. Many Not a Ball Game j of those who supported him in his "But you're not rooting at a ball j unsuccessful bid for the GOP nomi- game when you go to the polls nation wore bright red "Taft" 4 Minnesotans to Discuss Handicaps MINNEAPOLIS Minne- If the worker is to be fired, the your chance of world peace." court held, there must be in ad-1, That_was_vn_a speech prepared dition to such membership a find- Nov. 4. This isn't a ball game, buttons. And it isn't a beauty contest. This He told an audience at Ogden is your bread and butler. This is that to hear President Truman and i during intensive ing of reasonable grounds for dis- Connecticuti New "I'm pi Gov. Adlai Stevenson, the Demo- cratic presidential nominee, tell it (Continued on Page 17, Column 3.) STEVENSON Retail Egg Prices Turn Downward By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Retail egg prices turned down- ward this week in many stores after running into consumer price resistance. And the majority of loyalty. and Massachusetts from early morning! The court ruled in a case involv-1 until late at njgnt. ing decorated, legless World War Moving by train and automobile 'Good Siied Privy' "They try to give the impres iminnr tpll it u.c nese anproacn route! aim iaivcu rid be'ean 2o'fresh vegetables edged higher as towering Papa-san Mountain, the supplies from nearby growing Chinese jumpoff point just to the areas decreased seasonally. Otherwise, ehanaes in food Oil Dispute Main Reason, Mossadegh Says Premier Hopes 'England.Will Face Realities' TEHRAN, Iran i.fl Premier Mohammed Mossadegh today broadcast to the nation an an- nouncement that his government is "unfortunately obliged to break diplomatic relations with Britain." The message, originally intended for the Majlis but not read be- cause a quorum did not attend, said the reason for the step was that "the British government has so far prevented our reaching an agreement" on the oil dispute. Mossadegh told the people that breaking diplomatic relat ions would not mean breaking "thc bonds of friendship" between the two nations, "because the Iranian nation always has looked with re- spect to the British nation, and hopes that the authorities of that government also will give more attention to the realities of the present World situation and the awakening of nations, and will for- get the attitude it so far has shown, conforming its policies to the pres- ent world situation." Mossadegh had threatened such a break if his terms for settling the bitter oil dispute were not met. Britain rejected those terms as "unreasonable and unacceptable" in a note delivered Tuesday. (Washington took a serious view' I of the diplomatic break. Officials By GEORGE A. McARTHUR SEOUL machine gunners, crouching behind baibed i touchy oil jispute. They called it wire barricades today mowed down waves of Chinese Reds storming the crest of Triangle Hill on the Central Korean front.   workcr lr riTBSraiSB IsMrk-SfrBJS t Hartley Law tions in meat prkes were lai'gelv. [ruu.ity "shopping special" 1 trcl o vsiii iji. Y With a Handicap" here Friday at affairs, failed to make a finding of the annual meeting of the Minne- 1 grounds for disloyalty sola Society for Crippled Children j and Adults, Inc. The four arc Henry W. S. Till- man, Virginia, former state presi- dent of the Junior Chamber of Commerce; Jimmy Byrne. Minn- eapolis sports writer: Betty Gir- ling, staff member of radio station firing Kutcher. The set asjde an ordcr re. moving Kutcher from the VA pay- roll, but left stand an order sus- pending him pending dctermi- night, Truman said in his prepared j c nas ms slalluaru ul Hartford address that Eisenhower Jbccauso of [rce collective has "compromised every principle j b thc senator said, "not of personal loyalty by abetting the because o( the Democratic party." scurrilous big-lie attack on Gen. In hjs galt Lake speech, Taft George C. Marshall." Raps McCarthy He said Marshall, Eisenhower's nation by Gray "of the ultimate commanding officer" in the sue as to whether on all thc evi- second world war, is a man "who dence reasonble grounds exist for stands in a class by himself as a eapolis sports writer: -Betty wr- sue as to whether on all the evi- Sec0nd world war, is a man "who na; Revenue Burer ling, staff member of radio station dence reasonble grounds exist for stands in a class by himself as a He accused Prcsi KUOM: and R. I. Distad. St. Paul, j belief that Kutcher is disloyal to patriot devoted to "the service of j telling a "big lie" member of the state industrial the government of the United country." ja campaign speec hammered at "corruption in gov- ernment" and documented scan- dals from the WPA in the 1930s to recent investigations of the Inter- nal Revenue Bureau. President Truman of confined to trimmed to attract customers. These featured items showed an un- usually wide variety. Butter eased a bit at the whole- sale level. Butter production is averaging better than a year ago and consumption has declined, so supplies are heavy. TT c D' -'s'on troops captured Triangle Hill Wednesday they ringed the crest with barbed wire. They were ready and wait Shouldn't Vote, Marshall Says Iran nationalized the billion dol- of Anglo- the spring of 1951 and in July that year the huge Abadan refinery of the com- pany closed down. This deprived Iran of its main source of govern- mental income and the government now is virtually bankrupt. Month after month. British and United States negotiators have sought to find some formula for an agreement to settle thc bitter problems arising out of nationali- zation, but without success. WASHINGTON C. Marshall, wartime Army Chief of Staff and former Secretary of ing when a Chinese j statgi sajd Wednesday he had nev- Pbout 800 men-swarmed up the hP had been a George I'Veep7 Puils Boner On Minnesota Tour slopes just after dark Wednesday night. The assaulting force was chopped to bits by machine guns. At dawn Thursday another Red battalion charged up the slope. Again the machine guns chattered, j again the Chinese faltered and ST. CLOUD, Minn. M Vice President Albcn Barkley raised some eyebrows here Wednesday night while pointing up the rapidity commission. I States. the rest of this week were: Chicken iiumou fryers, roasters and stewing hens, imc a oig lie" when he said in I hams and fresh pork Boston butts, I his country." ja campaign speech that he had (legs of lamb, lamb chops, round I "The Republican candidate did cleaned up corruption wherever he steak, round pot roasts, and sey- fnllnrj it era, types of fresh and frozen fish. (Continued on Page 13, Column 4.) Itound TRUMAN Appearing most frequently on j broke, the lists of shopping specials for i The A m e r i c. a r, s consolidated _ i .1 way Wanted Barkley Says Pilot in Korea Meets Death On Birthday WITHU S. FIFTH AIR FORCE, i By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Korea a strafing run j vice President Alben Barkley says he "halfway wanted to be the near Wonsan Tuesday, Communist: Democratic presidential nominee" at the party's Chicago convention, ground fire struck a U. S. F84 jet -But, as William Jennings Bryan once said, I ended up getting fewer and sent it spiralling earthwards. votes and more applause than he told a party gathering A young second lieutenant in- j Of at the St. Cloud Technical High School Wednesday night. fho Thnnrlpriff rarlinpd his i CUIT thiMtdh side the Thunderjet radioed his can truthfully say, flight mates: j that I was only a heartbeat away "Here I am on my first com- j from that nomination." bat flight. It's my j Berkley's appearance on behalf look what's happening to of the Stevenson Sparkman Seconds later the plane crashed. national ticket came on the eve of 1 the arrival of Gov. Earl Warren of California, stumping Northern Minnesota today on behalf of the Eisenhower-Nixon candidacies. Before his St. Cloud appearance, Barkley appeared briefly in Anoka, their positions Thursday afternoon er voted because he had been a professional soldier almost all his Ue and had kept out of politics. Marshall was reached by tele- phone at his Leesburg, Va., home _ o _......_, today. He returned Tuesday from j ic-Farmer-Labor candidates for a European tour and when ques- j Minnesota offices, including Orville speakers Waving at a group of Democrat- Uieil pOSlUUUK Xllliioua; when they won the last Red-held j he told them tioned by shipboard reporters in New York about voting this year, knob on Triangle after a 90-minute fight, Early Thursday Thursday morning the Reds pushed through the ROK de- fenses and gained momentary con- trol of the crest of Sniper Ridge. The South Koreans rallied and stormed back to the top. Just before dawn a Chinese bat- talion struck again, forcing the South Koreans back 200 yards. Asain the ROKs rallied and coun- i mi____ J "My father was a Democrat. My mother was a Republican. I am a''. Episcopalian. I never voted and I'm not voting this time." His retort raised questions as to whether he intended any criticism of either of this year's presiden- tial candidates and as to why he had never cast a ballot. Freeman, gubernatorial aspirant, Barkley said: "I hope you send all of these fellows down to the State Capitol and keep Wisconsin among the leading states of the nation." Actor Dan Duryea Injured in Fall PATTERSON, La. Movie star Duryea, specialist in screen uwu jjan uuryca, bpt-ujciuai. m Marshall said in reply to a ques-1 villain roles, suffered a broken rib, tion as to whether he meant any I contusions and bruises today when criticism "none whatever." i he fell from the roof of a tugboat thp rhi-l As to why he had never wheelhouse. neersae hand to Lnd and'finaUy! Marshall said; "I've been in the! Thc accident happened on a mo them off at a.m. _ officer at the said the South Koreans had re- stored all their positions at noon and were digging in against fur- ther expected Chinese onslaughts. presidents alike. I never felt wanted to exercise a political choice and I've kept out of poli- tics." vie location here. Duryea was knocked unconscious in the fall. Clerks Reminded Of Ballot Duty McCarthy Would 'Club Some Americanism' Into Adlai Aides Gov. Adlai Stevenson of Illinois is a well-blanketed presidential candidate. The Democratic candidate is all smiles as he receives the gift from petite and pretty Caroline MoTonic of Umatilla, Ore., during a short stop today en route to a major speaking engage- ment in San Francisco, Calif. (AP Wirephoto to The Republican- Herald) MADISON Gov. Kohler re- minded county and municipal clerks today of their obligation to mail absentee ballots to all Wis- consin citizens in military service By THE ASSOC.ATED PRESS have the, guts tc, name the names Elk River and Big Lake before Sen. Joseph McCarthy said Wed- and the "en who have street corner audiences. Warren, nesday nignt he might be able I 
                            

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