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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - October 15, 1952, Winona, Minnesota                              FALL OPENING-GREATER WINONA DAYS EDITION Cold, Windy Tonight, Continued Cold Thursday MW 'in ONE VOLUME 52, NO. 204 SIX CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA. WEDNESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 15, 1952 FORTY-FOUR PAGES Ike Promises Leadership for Lasting Peace Seeks to Break Democratic Hold On Solid South Di e in Wi sconsin Andrei Gromyko, Russia's ambassador to Great Britain, shakes hands with Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt, member of the U.S. delegation to the United Nations General Assembly, at the opening session of the assembly Tuesday in New York City. Gromyko, former head of the Soviet U-N. delegation, is attending the assembly along with Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Vishinsky. (AP Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald) _____________________ No Trick Can EnJ War, Adlai Says By DON WHITEHEAD EN ROUTE WITH EISENHOW- ER Dwigbt D. Eisenhow- er strove mightily today to smash the Democratic hold on the Solid South while holding out a promise of leadership which would provide a firm base on which to build last- ing world peace. For the second straight day he rampaged through his home state of Texas blasting at the Truman Powder Plant Blast New (Jim Legion Asks Marshall To Vote Nov. 4 NEW ULM, Minn. UB A tele- gram was sent from here today to Gen. George C. Marshall asking him to change his mind and vote in the Nov. 4 election. The telegram was signed by Herb Sehoonover of Lewisville, com- j mander of the Watonwan-Brown j administration with scorn and sar- j County Council .of the American j Legion. The group took a unani-1 mous decision on sending the wire casm. His accusation was the clear im- plication at least 'that the Truman leadership had failed to win the respect of America's allies and even the Kremlin. And he said these were necessary if peace is to be won. at a meeting Tuesday night. The legionaires took issue with this statement given by the gen- eral to newsmen in New York Tues- day: "My father was a Democrat, and rm not voting this time." By JACK BELL M i J t J it, f JJJ'3 Ji C V1> L' UJ LJ4 JJUiitiiJ SPOKANE, Wash, Gov. Adlai E. Stevenson said today that ten. tQd Then hg win fly into Tennes. Warmed by a series of rousing j Sehoonover snid "This is a shock birthday receptions his ing statement by one of__the jna- 62nd the general aimed his fire on Ft, Worth and Dallas ______i- ____ llfcll 11C Will IIJ 144 CU Dwight D. Eisenhower knows full well "there is no trick that can end for speeehes at Memphis and the Korean War." The Democratic presidential nominee. iiic ucmuvmvtv J mounting strength in not Wyoming-pushed his campaign to 6______________the Pacific Northwest with a sharp attack on his Republican TODAY Ike Seeks To Reunite Republicans By JOSEPH ALSOP Knoxville before returning to New York. Speaks At Alamo He chose the Alamo in San An- stand "on Korea7foreign pVl- tonio-the birthplace of Texas in- I icy and public power development, i dependence from out- Saying that Eisenhower has last night on how i plied we could bring._our he Texas Gov. our I men home from Korea soon if we would only train some South Kore- an soldiers to take their Stevenson declared in a speech prepared for a street-corner rally: Won't Play Politics "I will not play politics with war and peace. Our men are fighting in Korea so they will not have to i fight in Alaska or Spokane or WITH THE EISENHOWER PARTY. The important thing to "They will come home from K.O- reaiize about Gen. Eisenhower's i rea just as soon as our national campaign is that a working theory i safety permits. And, for my part, lies behind it. In these last weeks, 11 deplore the suggestion .that they the general has said and done a come home any sooner. good many things that have seem- j "There is no trick that can end ed out of character. He has gonejthe Korean I am sure so far, in fact, that Col. Robert R th gerjerai xnows this full well." been presumed to stand for, has now joyfully hailed "the new Eis- enhower." Yet if the colonel understood this theory being followed by Eisenhower and his intimate staff, he might not be so jubilant about the general's apparent transforma- yesterday, the Illinois governor preached" the Democratic doctrine that Americans never had it so good, in a material way. He added to this the promise, in a speech prepared for delivery in Pendleton, Ore., later in the after- noon, that if he is elected "I in- tion's great leaders. The Boy Scouts and many have been work- ing months to turn out a good vote Nov. 4 and now the general throws cold water on their efforts." Army Seeking 'Proper Share' Of Atom Needs ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. Frank Pace, in an unveiling ceremony to- He said." "Our decision to de- day for the first atomic artillery part from tradition has not been an said the Army is seeking easy one. It had to be based on j have a "proper share" of nuclear. Allan Shivers called him the can- didate who stands for the Demo- cratic principles that Texans re- spect. Shivers said there were many Texans who never before had voted for a candidate "who wore any other mantle but that of the Demo- issues and concepts more funda- mental than party regularity. It materials earmarked for its use. Pace set forth the Array's claim had to be strong enough to over-1 to allotment of fissionable material come the accumulated prejudices address prepared for delivery of. many decades Then he added his belief that Ei- senhower rather than Democratic presidential nominee Adlai Steven- at a demonstration of the 280- millimeter, all-purpose gun and three of the latest model tanks. The phrasing used by Pace left son could best capitalize on social Open the question of whether the gains "meanwhile ruthlessly actually has any atomic am- shearmg away the red tape, oust the tend to run a clean, honest gov- In brief, Eisenhower was appall- ernment." Present munition to use in the big, mobile envisioned it as a general purpose gun for firing conventional pro- Firemen Search Plane wreckage in a coal car for one of two persons killed when a light plane crashed into a highway bridge over railway tracks in South San Francisco, Calif., Tuesday night. Part of the wreckage and the other occupant of the plane fell on the railway tracks. Police said the pilot of the plane was C. K. Bowman, and the passenger William Mills, both of Sacramento, Calif. (AP Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald) Gilt3, Describes; Ike's Income in Past Killers of Father And Two Sisters CHESTER, Calif. (B-Sandra Gay Young vesterday described two men as the killers of her father, two sisters and a little playmate in a robbery-mas- ed by the sheer violence of the fight within the Republican party, which he only discovered when he was rudely plunged into practical politics. It seemed to Eisenhower then, and it seems to him now, that the two party system itself could be destroyed by this violence, i Both he and such members of j his staff as Gov. Sherman Adams "What is he said, "I know what I am talking about. I have cleaned up a lot of evil Re- publican practices in Illinois and cracked down quickly and ruthless. !y on misconduct wherever I have found it." The Illinois governor said that if he is elected, he will run an eco- He said he to Alamo plaza to hear Eisenhower, In the process of hi (Continued on Paae 4, Column 7) IKE in 1949 to provide also for use of geoned and ,eft for dead-thrown nuclear fission shells. across the bodies the four vic- i Pace's remark about exerting (tims in trunk Of her father's strong efforts to get allocation of j automobile. from the fractured La Crosse Woman Electrocuted and Sen. Fred Seaton, have always before their eyes the specter of the collapse of the two party system in the event of a Republican defeat this year. Would Be Far to Right They argue that another Repub- lican defeat will give Sen. Robert A. Taft and his partisans full con- trol of the party machinery, if only by default. They argue further that u the more respectable Republican government, I will gladly weigh conservatives, even Sen. Taft him-1 the experience and training a self will be quite unable to dom- I governor any day alongside that of inate this alcercd Republican par- any military man. Until this cam- ty. The men who will really be in paign, I had not heard that gener- the driver's seat, they say, willjals were exactly celebrated for be the new breed of right-wing their devotion to economy." of the stripe of i Jn Salt Lake city's jam-packed material to the Army also suggest' ed that the Atomic Energy Com- mission had to be persuaded. Details of the new gun became known two weeks ago when report- ers and photographers saw it man- euver and fire in demonstrations j shirts, blue jeans and black shoes, LA CROSSE, Wis. Knute here. Invited to today's ceremony and drove a big blue_car. Sondron, 33, LaCrosse, was elec-1 were members of Congress and of- ficials of the several companies ______, said! that collaborated in development Mrs. Sondron apparently slipped j and the gun. Guvd Young, 43 17.128) from a Reviving .for a time coma and shock of a skull, Sondra said one of the as- sailants was bald and masked; the other unmasked and carrying a gun. She said both wore green Dist. Atty. Bertrand Janes talked with her in a hospital, then took nomical government. He said he j in development her and her mother to the mas. knew about that too. j apparently slipped and manufacture of the gun. I sacra scene on a lonely logging Cites State Budget whjle jn The sSO-millimeter gun (a caliber road. He Mid Sondra related. "I have run a tight-fisted, bal- j antl of a heat lamp. slightly over 11 inches) can fire j ner anced budget government in 6-year-old son. Kenneth re- j at targets 20 miles away with what nois-and I had to do it, incidental- turned home from school at 4 p. m. the Army claims is pin-pomt Pre" Friday to ash at his gwcery store g without much help from a Re- jwhen Sondron returned home about cision "four times more accu- 1 SB Saturday He bought the chil- lican he declared, h found the bo tr- rate at long range than any mobile publican he declared, jan hour iatcr he found the boy try- (rate at long range than any adding: popsicles and candy, then "When it comes to economy in tub. iuicii uuuan-ico ujiu. ing to pull his mother from the artillery pieces developed prior to started home to Chester, 14 miles i..L TT i World War II. TenY ears ,303 By EUGENE LEVIN NEW YORK Dwiglit D. Eisenhower had a gross income of from his book, "Crusade in during the past 10 years, his headquarters says. A financial statement made public here late yesterday showed the Republican presidential candidate paid in taxes. Subtraction of these taxes and allowable deductions from the gross income, the statement said, left Eisenhower with a net of j for the 10 years. His net j without the book was Eisenhower's revelation followed a similar financial statement last month by his Democratic opponent, Gov. Adlai E. Stevenson. More Than Adlai Stevenson listed his gross income for the last 10 years as and his taxes as leaving him The Republican candidate's fi- nancial statement was released here by his executive assistant, Arthur Vandenberg Jr. Eisenhower currently South. Vandenberg also gave out a let- ter he received from Eisenhower authorizing release of the financial Barkley in State Today, Warren Coming Thursday By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Vice President Alben Barkley today was heading the continuing verbal drive of the Democrats to capture Minnesota's 11 electoral is campaigning in the ion. votes in the Nov. 4 genera! e'ect- Barklcy's scheduled arrival by plane at 2 p. m. came 24 hours) after the party announced its 1952 campaign would be bulwarked with data. The general said in the three speeches in the state by Sen. Joseph R. McCarthy and Sen. William Jenner. Mormon Tabernacle last night, Ste- venson made a quick revision in ed to make sacrifices to expedi-1. ency, in order to avoid the thing industry, they so much fear. Moreover, such sacrifices to expediency, rightly or wrongly, seemed relatively safe to the Eisenhower strategists, for still another reason. After a bad start, Eisenhower has become an incandescent pub- lic personality. Gov. Adlai E. Stev- enson may be much admired, but as a man he remains a dim figure to most of the voters. Eisenhower, on the other hand, is a figure warmly human, full of life, friend- ly and outgiving. How he succeeds in emanating such dynamic warmth through each day's gruel- "ling round of public appearances, no one can tell. But the emana- tion is powerful and the voters re- spond to it. On these facts, a distinctly un- expected Eisenhower strategy has been built up. In effect, the Eis- enhower personality, the Eisen- built on war orders to ers He seemed to have picked up the crowd and carried it with him, which he apparently failed to do in an earlier appearance at Casper, Wyo. In his prepared text, he had said presiaential candidates and supporters? (Continued on Page 13, Column 2) Follow Campaign By PRINCETON RESEARCH SERVICE Kenneth Fink, Director PRINCETON, N. much effect does all the activity of a campaign have upon the mass of Americans of voting age? way. The trip was a treat for the children: Sondra's sisters Jean. 7, and Judy, 6, and a neighbor, Mi- letter: "I am now, in every sense of the word, a private citizen, and with- President Truman on Oct. 28. After a press conference at the Twin Cities airport, Barkley was chael Ssile, slain, and Son dra. Two men in a car overhauled them. The unmasked gunman got in the front seat, between Young and Sondra, and forced the grocer 
                            

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