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Winona Republican Herald: Thursday, June 19, 1952 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - June 19, 1952, Winona, Minnesota                            Fair, Somewhat Cooler Tonight Warmer Friday Chiefs vs. Faribauir KWNO AM-FM Tonight at 8 VOl. 52, NO. 105 FIVE CENTS PER COPY W1NONA, MINNESOTA, THURSDAY EVENING, JUNE 19, 1952 TWENTY-FOUR PAGES Truman Hits Ike, Taft on Tax Issue Ike Promises Tax Cut After Conrad Lands Cost of Living Western World Is Rearmed Military Might Must Equal That Of Russians By GORDON G. GAUSS DENVER cut in taxes in two years, which would be made possible by balancing the national budget, was promised yesterday by Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower if he is elected President. No cut in taxes can be made, he j said, until the budget is balanced j and the military might of the West-1 ern nations equals that of Russia, goals which he estimated could be) reached in two years under his leadership in the White House. After that, he foresees a "steady I shrinkage" in the tax load. t The Republican presidential as- pirant expressed the opinions dur- ing a conference late yesterday with Oregon delegates, who are' backing him unanimously. To Fight for Texas Votes j He also promised them his voice "will be raised" in the controversy over delegates from Texas, his na- tive state, where he contended the will of the Republicans was "thwarted." National Republican headquarters announced at Washington that all Texas contests between delegates supporting Eisenhower and Sen. Robert A. Taft have been referred to the national committee, which will meet in Chicago, probably July 1. Eisenhower said he wants no del- egate "that I have real reason to believe has been elected by any I other means than the free expres-: sion of the American people." The genera) also took a position, i shortly after the Oregon meeting, j favoring legislation to place states in control of off-shore oil deposits, j He said this was subject to a check on constitutional issues, but indica- ted he sees no serious problem: there. No Schedule Today Preparing for a weekend trip j to Texas and Nevada, the general! announced no schedule for today, I reserving it for office work and j relaxation. i He plans to fly to Denison, Tex., i his birthplace, Saturday, then go j on to Dallas and then fly to Boulder i City, Nev., and Hoover Dam Sun- j day. His schedule calls for a re- j turn to his Denver headquarters I Sunday night. Late tomorrow he will resume his conferences with Western dele- gates. He is scheduled to meet representatives f r o m where seven of the eight conven- j tion votes are pledged to Taft; j Idaho, where all 14 votes are count-; ed in the Taft column, and Wash-' ington, where 20 of the 24 votes are in his own pocket. He already has met delegates from five Wyom-: ing and Utah on Tuesday and gon and Arizona yesterday. Two Arizona delegates who are officially uncommitted said the general made a good impression on them, but neither committed: himself. Five of the 14 Arizona del- egates were among a party of nine fl I ft from the state which met the gen- I 11011111 eral privately. Only one of them I IWVVI Vwlill Vl was among the 1U Arizona voting delegates who have expressed a preference for Tafi. He indicated afterward that he still favors the senator. Wide Range of Subjects Eisenhower touched on a wide- range of subjects in his meeting with the Oregon delegates. News- men were admitted to the session. The general said he has no simple- solution to the Korean War but believes if the United States should pull out it would amount to "an of our po- Columnist Drew Pearson, right, talks to his attorney, William Roberts, in Washington after filing charges against Charles Patrick Clark, Washington lawyer, who punched Pearson in the face in the lobby of the Mayflower Hotel in Washington Wed- nesday. Clark told reporters he was annoyed and angry over columns Pearson had written about him. One column last week stated that Clark is a "lobbyist" for Spam. (AP Wire-photo to The Republican-Herald) Pearson Poked by Lobbyist for Spain 6y ED CREAGH WASHINGTON Pearson has been punched again. And the man who threw the punch, lobbyist Charles Patrick Clark, says it couldn't have landed on a more appropriate j Dr. Ryan said that Mrs. Man- targel. jning" was doing well and will "1 felt I'd be unfaithful to my Irish Clark told re-1 allowed sk up today if she feels 1 Porters, "'if 1 didn't do somethmg." Sin2 entered lne hos. 1 The one-blow encounter between May 24 for a virus infection, the columnist commentator and :She remained there until the births Within Fraction Of Record High Climbs to 189 Durinn Month Ending May 15 WASHINGTON Wi-The govern- ment's latest coat-of-living baro- meter moved up today under pressure of rising food and rent costs to within a tiny fraction of the record high reached last Janu- ary. Thc living-cost index, measur- i ing prices of food, clothing, shelt- er and a host of other things climbed during the month ending May 15 two-tenths of one per cent i to 189 per cent, of the av- j That is 4.1 per cent over the mark of 18 months ago when price and wagr; controls took effect. The peak figure last .January was 18'J.l. Raise for RailworkerJ A million and a (juarter rail- workers will get an automatic two- cent hourly wage boost as a result of the latest increase in living costs. Their work contract tics wages to the cost-of-living index to her at South Shore Hospital last! "mj are made each night. She has three other young- i' 'K i Another wage earners in The first thilrf Ihp "irl WIK itcxtiles' aJrcraf' and 'Jl1 refining boL at" 23 p the a one- and the third and fourth U j 16 minutes ater. f. f h The babies, all placed in mcu- m h bators, were reported to weigh, The price of food at the between two and three pounds; st d h each and to measure about a of onc per cem long Several hours after the last; But prjce rjf of fuel birth, hospital physicians reported ,and and of housc. furnisn. their condition as fair. Mngs all dropped fractionally. All four deliveries were de-: Ceiling Price, scribed as normal by Dr. Robert AllhfJUgh pric's on most jtems R. Ryan, who delivered the babies :have office of Price SU- In Norway OSLO, Norway Conrad, flying father of 10, landed his liny Piper Cub on Sola Air Field, west- ern Norway, today to begin his second good will flight in Europe. He hopped the Atlantic via Iceland and came here from Stornoway, Scotland. Conrad, of Winona, Minn., is bringing invitations to mayors of Scandinavian towns to attend thc Minneapolis Aquatermial July J8-27. An official committee was on hand to greet the smiling soloist. Two years ago he flew the same plane from the United States to Rome. It has a speed of 125 miles an hour and a wing span of 29 feet. Mother, 27, Has Quads, 3 Boys, Girl WEyMOirm, Mass, iff Airs. Marion Manning, 27, is the mother of healthy quadruplets to- Three boys and a girl were- Sen. Robert A. Taft places a hand on the arm of his invalid wife, a native Winonan, as they arrived at the Republican sena- torial committee dinner in Washington. The Ohio senator, candi- date for the Republican presidential nomination, discussed cam- paign plans with party leaders at the closed meeting. Mrs. Taft, still confined to her wheelchair afler a recent illness, is pushed by the Tafi chauffeur, (AP Wirephoto) with the assistance of Dr. Edward officials armounced yes- i J. Howley. Doing Well lerday ceilings' would be suspend- this Sweden Unlikely To Bolt Neutrality Says No One Can Cut Taxes By 15 Per Cent Calls Ike 'Nice Considers Using T-H in Steel Case By DOUGLAS B. CORNELL WASHINGTON I'rfihidcnt Truman .stud today the steel strike is a serious situation, j Gen. Eisenhower still is a friend I of bin uni nu J'rc.vtlcnl can cul I taxes 15 per cent. Truman rated through those suli- jccls ar.d a 1'ew others at liis news conference. He said that j he isn't running for office, so he jean the (acts about cutting taxes. Actually, he said, they 'ought lo be increased in order to meet the deficit. Sen, Robert A, Tall of Ohio, who, along willi Cen. Dwighl IJ. Eisen- hower, is a leading contender for the Republican presidential nom- JnatJOR, said yesterday he would put in a is per cent tax cul if he JYesJdent. Mr, Truman was asked if he thought any Democratic president could trim taxes that much. No, he didn't, said. And if they could have been reduced that much he would have done it. Then could any Republican pres- ident slash taxes 1.5 cent? No, Truman said, not unless he wants to put the country farther in the hole than it is. Eisenhower has not gone as far as 7'aft in promising a tax reduc- tion but he has said a reduction would he possible in about two years. Well, after all the speeches Eis- enhower has been making, does Truman still like the general? Yes, he still think; Ike is a nice guy. j Of course he still considers Eisen- I hower a friend. I Do you "wish him Mr. Truman chuckled and said he 1 couldn't say that, adding that EU- i enhower isn't running in the Dem- ms in turn, had been i fjn advice rf her husband John, a pff 35-year-old bus line operator, who raked over the coals twice in he djd nol t' risk a premature arrival without mc-d- Charles Patrick Clark Bill Faces Senate Battle Pearson's after ilunch yesterday in the lobby of the jcaj attention. fashionable Mayflower Hotel. "What would I do if they came Pearson, 54, weighs 175 pounds, while she was at he said. Clark, 44, weighs around 180. Manning was not at the hospital _. when the first birth occurred. He There were varying accounts of had Wlth lhf. nosplU, of. i the incident but they agreed officials that he would remain at ithis detail: One punch was thrown, [home awaiting a phone call. ;A straight left. It grazed Pear-1 Hls v'lfe wtnt mu> Iabor son's cheek and left a smarting hourand 18 bcJore the :red spot on his neck. Pearson went to the U.S. attor- The babies were baptized quickly ney's office and swore out a war-' after birth by the Rev. William irant charging simple assault. -.Commune, n Catholic priest. The Clark arranged to be in court b-v' hosPital today to answer the complaint. .He's a lawyer. He worked for the 'J Truman War Investigating Com- mittee when the present occupant :of the White House was a senator. By GUSTAV SVENSSON STOCKHOLM, Sweden neutral .Sweden, irate ocratic campaign, over the shooting down of a Swedish plane by Soviet, jet fighters, Sifuallon Striout beefed up her already strong defenses against Russia today bin' While situation is be- whr-n a steep i was to still fight shy of participation in such Western Mr. Truman con- i UK nances as thc Atlantic Pact. he gave no indication as to The Swedish government already has' ordered a sup-up in air attack he might have m mind to meet. it. The question of usin lagging sales since last November, i rise in the latest uring May ............_ ,...v- index, measuring alertness throughout the- country prices for thc- month endin? and instructed its' air force to .hoot back if fired on by boost. Clause in Contract These workers have a clause in their contract which ties their wages to the cost of living. Changes irn !f attacked. -Swedish foreign Mmisttr Oesten nden, cut short his Jtahan vaca- all''r lhe incident and was, "OSTS 31 r AllClin I are made 'in scales each due here hy air from Rome today, three months; to balance pay with i But political observers txpressed changes in living costs. doubt that Linden's return would Another 100.000 wage in any change in Sweden's. AUSTIN, Minn. lff> state the Hartley is under consid- eration, Mr. Truman said, but it I has been right along. He had been j asked whether he thought he should or would use the soon. The President said he regards UM: >if as "purely pc-rmis- i as a reporter put it, rather i than mandatory. Ami commented that he is pretty hard in force when doesn't, want to do anything and healthy scream as the water was poured on its head. Hospital officials described bap- four-tenths of 1 per cent between Caulina flying boat, blasted from commander, prese tism so soon as the "usual pre- April 15 and Mav tf. cautionary measure." It is done in premature births. I The last cost-of-living index, pub- n__.--... r f... tne Monday over the Baltic Pn''-s- by the Bureau of Labor Sta- flown over Sovii-l were a- monlh s wjtn seven men aboard, had territory iro- VKW April was just four-tenths of 1 cent below January Frank Hilton, riilioriil nd commander, wil! a[ the yearly memorial services, be held tonight in the Austin High The Swedish reply declared that. only two Swedish planes opera-, He was expect- L-y injunction would prov Ninety-nine days have been used already, Truman replied, and ZQ more would just orolort-' the agony. Truman One said, "You'd get Vl days." Truman snapped: How do you Census Climbs ting in the area two rescue flying it tiie time were boats, both ufl- ed to arrive Jate today by plane thai'' from Kansas City. when asked wh'-Uier he was im- He suggeMed building up the South Korean army to the point the columnist said. Clark said he was bothered by several things. The columnist had written recently that WASHINGTON perennial was getting American money for trim the bill carrying Spain faster than Generalissimo .funds for flood control and Franco could spend it. 'tion in on the Clark blamed Pearson for ate tide today. helping defeat Sen. Brewster 'R- Sen. Douglas (D-I11) has served SIe' in Maine's Republican pri- 11 try to reduce the naary election last Monday. u.t measure by at least 150 I Pearson was pummeled by Sen., where troops of the United Na-. dollars. He faced stiff Joseph McCarthy. Wisconsin Ra- tions could be hauied back from opposition. :publican, the Suigravr- Club in) the front lines and kept as a mo- civil functions measure was: 1950. He's suing McCarthy and bile reserve. called up after Senate passage last others for Chinese Nationalists, he said, night of a deficiency should be kept on Formosa to pro- mor.ey bill, the bulk of which is tcct the island. to meet extra costs of the armed Acquiring West German strength services arising from the Korean for the Western World "may in the War during the current fiscal initial case cost us a little extra year, he said, but would be "worth it." On the domestic scene, he said, AuVentlStS Plan the federal deficit must be ended "and if that requires us to go iNow he's registered as a Iobbyi5t f for the Spanish government. tWQ prematurei bul Pearson said last night he didn't phvsicjins explained that such j get a chance to return Clark's multiple births rarely go full term. ;punch and wasn't sure if he would According to medical sources have, anyhow. quadruplets occur once in "I don't conduct altercations in births, the lobby of the Mayflower X-rays taken at the time Mrs. JQ ]5g Million Manning entered thr; hospital in .May indicated she would give birth U. .S. pcpula- ioternalional waters. snd that the to nuads. dimbed to 1M.60Z.OOO on Mav downed plane never flew closer liiif-al sn'J jicuduced M least a nod Nurses at the hospital vaid Mrs, j Bureau than miles (rum Soviet terri- Highlight of the meeiing will bv ,n I'm- direction of Avecell Harri- Mannin out. pa arnrM and therefore incapable of (b-'n ind plying that swelworkers would at anybodv visitors dad registered today. nol an injunction, Truman A "thofouKli invpsiiitmivn" had 2'WO 3re to He said they did obey established that both stayed b.rlore the meeting doses' Saturday wn.b irlettion of ofli- corifcrenc'- was largely po- .-ur.'sf-.v at the hospital vaid Mrs, j Bureau estimated than fi miles (rum Soviet terri- of We meeting will Ije m tin- direction of Avecell Ham- Manning "was wonderful through-' was a fjf 419 000 lory, the note added. Russia claims 'tHe parade, for 4 p, m. Kfi-- niao. SJemwralic pf-x out. When she was having severe Januarv J The figures' in-! her f-rrjtona) waters extend 12 Winning units in the idenlial hopefuls. Truman said pains early in labor she never; duded of the irmvi miles beyond her shore. W'H receive some in Harriman's m of murmured." Forces sutioaed ovrseas, Both Catalia.s were searching 'J o I u m b i a primary Tuesday fnr m.vcln'J------- ''OUWfi 'I1'. ftlje thSB Lutheran Group I Approves Merger ALBERT LEA, Minn. The proposed merger of five Lutheran groups today had the uiianimoas Evangelical 56th same amount of defense and cut the budget sharply." Regarding politics, "he said, "i.; Day _ Adventists of have no intention of ignoring or-; staning Thursday. expected 2.0'Xi deiegaves to the an- Approval of the program Dual camp meeting of the Seventh- has been given by the Evaagc Minnesota, Lutheran and Lutheran churches. John J. Manning proud father of quadruplets born latr; last bis wife, Marion, at South Snore Hospital in ganizations and panicularly the' Three hundred family ten is have i Action thus far by ail the groups; state organizations through the es- been erected 
                            

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