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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - October 25, 1950, Winona, Minnesota                              Fair, Warmer Tonight And Thursday Football Friday Night on KWNO-FM VOLUME 50, NO. 212 FIVE CENTS PER COPY WSNONA, MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER TWENTY PAGES ations to Speed Allied Army Red Plot to Capture Philippines Reported Manila The national defense department says it has discovered a secret Commu- nist master plan to overthrow the Philippines government. It said the Reds planned an ar- my of men to begin the revolution next year. Discovery of the asserted plan at Communist headquar- ters resulted in suspension c! the writ of habeas corpus for all suspected subversives by President Quirino. .Many foreign diplomats to- day unofficially requested and were given copies ol Quirlno's proclamation. The defense department to- day said the secret Red pan called for 35 divisions totaling men trained to over- throw the government in No- vember of next year. Experts said the plan was well suited to conditions in the islands. Price Supports Urged !o Step Up Pork Output Greater Employment Could Cause Sharp Price Increases "ive U.N. Columns Thrust Toward Manchurian Border Invasion of Tibet Reported in Chins Peiping broadcast today that Chinese Reds are moving on Tibet. mid-Asian country seldom seen by white men. The Red radio ssid the purpose of the Chinese Communist advance was "to free Tibetans from imperialist oppression. It did not mention the size of the Chinese force, its destination or jland approaches. The grave news TODAY- Ferguson HasChance In Ohio By Stewart Alsop Mlddletown, Ohio "Don't write little Joe off." Ths traveler in Ohio hears this refrain everywhere, from Republicans even more than mountain passes would make trav ol -fnnt rilffir.tllt if nO question facing Brannan square miles in the lofty i appliances. Himalaya mountains and often is; The big 'called "the top of the world." In I is whether farmers, of their own (winter it is almost inaccessible by accord, will increase production of Til t.n TYlPPt Lll6 .whereabouts. By The Associated Press Seoul Five Allied columns thrust closer to Red China's Man- churian border today in a drive to end the Korean war. Beaten North Korean Communists fled be- fore them in ox carts and afoot. mountain retreat of the refugee Red regime. one of the United Nations forces arriving belatedly in Korea, was rail line, MacArthur's headquar- eo. regime But outside of the vehicular con- mentioned officially in Tokyo for centration the Air Force went a-1 the first time. A headquarters begging for targets. Ox carts and j spokesman said it is active in were attacked. _, ters said. Washington How much meat Americans eat next year and what prices they pay for it may hinge upon decisions to be made bj( Secretary of Agriculture Brannan from Huichon in the west- within the next few weeks. The administration farm chief An air spokesman in Tokyo said only one B-29 went out Wednesday, dropped propaganda leaflets on 'las southwest of Waegwan, In jm U-- jt aroppeo. propaganda leaner uu Nearest to the uneasy border, North Korean cities between latest reports, was the South Ko- the six advancing spearheads and rean Sixth division. It drove north- must decide whether the govern- ment will re-establish price sup- ports as a device for encouraging farmers to produce more hogs to boost 1951 pork supplies. Economists for the government and the food industry generally agree that the defense program will boost employment and con central area and expected to reach a point 35 miles from the boundary shortly. The British Commonwealth 27th brigade and three other South Ko- rean divisions were pushing north- ward on both sides and in the middle of the mountainous penin- sula. communique, by Moscow radio, bat- The Allied spearheads driving north continued to pick up big stores of abandoned Communist equipment, In captured Huichon, the South iaS SOULQWeSt' vl wiiirjswaii, ui South Korea, near the old Pusan! Korean Sixth division captured so beachhead perimeter Guerrillas were active in sever- al areas. The main railway line between Taegu and Taejon was cut for several hours by raiders who ambushed a patrol. A bypassed pocket of an es- amated Reds 14 miles south of the east coast port of Wonsan a while, to cut a sumer buying power. A normal portion Intelligence ofiicers at General MacArthur's headquarters in To- said reports that a South Ko- nereaoouts. may be spent at food stores because; already had reached Nomadic Tibet is ruled by yellow- of the prospect of smaller Korean-Manchurian border And- Lamaist nriests. It covers of new homes, automooiles and meat animals enough to meet the prospective greater demand for [Imoat without a government promise ito nrotect them against a sudden la, tms nine un tuc D.I.W Lu >j-wi. o c'apir H could be bid- At New Delhi, the Indian foreignjding up of meat prices under the ministry said- it had reports of influence "certain troop movements and in- cursions" by" Chinese Reds along the China-Tibet border. No Confirmation But it had no direct word of a Chinese invasion of Tibet, where already winter snows and icy nraiiiia.ii iias Manctiunan uoruer nuuuij jiuuwaj ing abundance of food for civilians a 0 r 0 s s the Korean peninsula is a. "powerful weapon against in-JKanggye has been reported thf .I..UU. Democrats. It is universally conceded to be at least possible that an obscure politician called Joseph T. Ferguson, Ohio's state auditor, will eliminate Robert A. Taft, country's lead- impossible. Neither Washington nor Hong Kong, a good Oriental listening post, had any report of a Sino-Red move against the priestly govern- ment of Tibet. The Peiping broadcast, heard In tie tte ing political figures, from the Sen- ate. When you first see Ferguson in action, you find this difficult first saw Ferguson "from Chungking, on display at a Democratic rally in this bustling manufacturing town. For the first -time in many weeks the popular Democratic gov- ernor, Frank Lausche, who has very conspicuously refused to en- dorse Ferguson, had consented to share a platform with his running mate. Both men spoke. The con- trast was downright cruel. Lausche is the greatest liv- ing exponent of the William Jennings Bryan school of American oratory. Although his speech was confined to wrath- ful denunciation of the "racke- teers" and "special and to throbbing approval of the American flag and the American home, Lausche soon had the audience of Democrat- ic jobholders literally gripping   ed to advance into Tibet to freelto encourage greater production. Tibetans from imperialist oppression and to consolidate the China, for inadequate biy return of price controls and some form of rationing. Brannan has said that a continu- "arc in error." There was no resistance, except for small arms fire in a few spots. Nor was there any evidence of a big convoy moving southward to oppose the United Nations cleanup, campaign. Vehicles Strafed The Far East Air Forces report ed a cluster of miscellaneous ve- hicles was strafed and rocketed by fighter planes Tuesday. Fifty- five vehicles were destroyed, 40 damaged. That was at Mupyong, 20 miles southwest of Kanggye, near the Manchurian border about midway our best means of staving off as long as possible the necessity for price controls and He must decide whether the gov- ernment should take steps to en- courage meat production beyond the current annual rate .of, about 146 pounds for each person. Fail- ure to get greater output could well require Imposition of price con- trols. Brannan's decision has possible political implications. Inadequate meat supplies with consequent price controls and rationing could put the administration in a tough spot, particularly if no steps were taken north of the captured Com munist capital of Pyongyang, ooxcar loads of ammunition and 20 Russian-built tanks damaged, but needing only minor repairs. The division's progress on the main route north of Huichon was halted by the condition of the road near the spot where fighters vir- tually wiped out a vehicular con- centration Tuesday. The Sixth division pulled back and was probing up another road. On its left flank, the South Ko- First division light opposition to Suhyon, 55 miles south of the Manchuriar. border. Drive And on the west coast, the Brit- For Defense of Europe Seen Force May Come Into Being Sooner Than Expected By Elton C. Fay Washington The 12 North Atlantic nations, banded together for defense against Communist armed might, may be able to create a bigger force and dc it faster than their military planners have hop- ed. This prospsct, cheering to a nervous western world, developed today out of the opening session yesterday of the military commit- tee of the North Atlantic treaty or- ganization. It resulted, NWA to Resume Flights to Seoul St. Airlines it would resume sched- oniuled air service into Seoul, Korea, loets luiure. 'n.ext Sunday for the first time The seven-man delegation is ex-i since it was cut off in June by the national defenses of the western borders of China, has been issued Jointly by the southwest China bureau of the Communist party of China, the southwest military area' and the headquarters of the sec ond field army." Reels Claim Country After the Red broadcast a Tibe tan delegation left New Delhi forj [Peiping to try to talk with Chinese Communist regime Tibet's future. pected to reach Peiping in mid-1 war. ________ It left Tibet in April. Tibet maintains it is autono- mous. The Reds insist it is part of China. The mountainous coun- try declared its independence cen- turies ago. China recognized its autonomy in 1914. Since Nationalist China fell last year, the Chinese Reds have clam- ored for inclusion of Tibet in Red bored guests. Here, it seemed, was a mere The initial flight will take off here Friday at a. m. (CST) and is scheduled to land at Kimpo airport Sunday at a.' m. The return flight leaves Seoul Sunc.ay at p. m. ITLJ A Concentration of North Korean vehicles in Mupyong and areas, indicated by blast symbols, were bombed and strafed by Air Force and Navy lighter planes, the Air Force reported today. On the ground, .the South Korean Sixth division was expected to reach within 35 'miles of Manchuria sometime today. On all other fronts (black arrows) U.N. forces were slowly advancing towards the Manchurian border with little opposition. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) IUI Ui Ul .fcl-ll blldU Hl.p ouu.. 1.1V.1 China. The lofty Tibet is described j to two weekly trips each way. UL p. iii. i ueutmst: uie n. President Croil Hunter of ths deter steps that lead to war." airline said one weekly flight each! Mme. Pandit defended her coi: way is temporarily planned but j try's stand on behalf of admissi I nf Defeat Faces Aggressors, Austin Warns Philadelphia Only by con- fronting all aggressors with "guar- anteed defeat" can the peace-liv- ing nations of the world "discour- age the use of says War- ren R. Austin. Austin, permanent U. S. dele gate to the United Nations, was a speaker at Philadelphia's ob- servance of United Nations day last night, sharing the rostrum with Madam Vijaya Lakshmi Pan- dit, India's ambassador to the United States The Soviet Union "alone among the great powers has employee military force directy in support of political Austin said. Since the inception of the U. N., Austin said, more than one-fourth of the people of the world have become independent, citing the Philippines, India, Pakistan. Bur- ma, Indonesia, Israel and Korea has been a lesson to po- It expects a prolonged and bitter_battle tential aggressors, Austin said, because the unity it inspired "can ish brigade built up its bridgehead across the Chorcgcnon river from Sinanju and began a drive on Chongju, 50 miles south of the bor- der. On the east coast, the South Ko- rean Capital division pushed from Iwon toward Songin, 40 miles away. Because the coastal road runs northeast, both towns are within a 75-mile radius of the bor- der. Pushing up the center of the peninsula, the South Korean 3ighth division was in the Tok- chon area, 80 miles south of the Vlanchurian border. Carrier planes from U. N. task force 77 continued looking for tar- gets in Northeast Korea, They destroyed 12 trucks, damaged 12 and destroyed four railroad cars Tuesday. I Helicopters from the fleet help- three things: essentially, from 1. The urgent plea by Amer- ican General Omar Bradley to the committee for action now to bring into being an integrated land, sea and air force to re- sist any new military thrusts by Russia or her Communist satellites. 2. A move in the military committee, sparked by one of the smaller nations, to contri- bute to the combined defen- sive organization a larger force than had been blueprinted. 3. The overt act of Com- munism bringing var to Ko- rea which has stepped up the tempo of rearmament by most of the Atlantic nations, whether or not they are fight- ing in the Far Eastern con- flict. A spokesman for the American neiiuuywts iiuiii t.uc ncov .7 7 ed destroyers in the, dangerous delegation to the conference didn t and prolonged job of clearing the identify the small country that set mine-infested waters off Wonsan. off the move to speed up formation mi._ -minoc rtf combined forces, tout he said Justice Department Prepares for Battle Against U. S. Reds The helicopters locate mines and then hover over them until destroyers arrive to explode them. The Far East naval summary reported many mines destroyed. Atomic Weapons Progress Cited By AEG Chief By Jack Adams The Justice department, currently rounding up alien Communist leaders for deportation, squared away today for a fight to register the Communist party as a "foreign dominated group. Washington Washington HOW'S atomic weapons program Progres-recommendations of the combined forces, but he said the idea immediately gained ap- proval from the other chiefs of staff who represent the treaty na- tions. The agreement of the military chiefs of staff on the idea of pro- viding forces faster and making them bigger was only a first step. Host of Details The proposal and a multitude of other details arising in yesterday's discussion compelled the military committee to recess until tomor- row, instead of finishing business in one day, while the chiefs con- sulted their superiors in Washing- ton and at their home capitals. Actually, whatever the military committee does constitutes only on sing? We're much better off today high level committee of defense ministers will act at a meeting on today Saturday and wm-ct] that comrm't- than we were a year ago, Chair-u ta turn may on to the inan Gordon Dean of the Atomic Energy commission told a news conference yesterday. treaty powers He put heavy emphasis on the wer.t on to say: "You can be sure we're strong- er than Russia." Dean said he thought a site for It expects a prolonged and bitter oawie. saiu ue A large staff of department officials went to work on the detailed working on tne hydrogen bomo petition which must be presented to the new Subversive Activities Con-j would be chosen shortly. ________________________________t-rnl hnnrri fSACRt as a first SteFJi Ti'itVinnf o-iviTKT rip. that this would soon be increased country. strongly anti-Communist Hunter said the line has already received many inquiries regarding coun- stand on behalf of admission of Red China to the U. N., saying that India does not believe China, though now lead by Reds, actual- ly is a Communist nation. n liiAll AV. ..u.v uw r One of these is a simple but ef'i0f Tibet fective political formula, which] August Red General Liu Po. Its army is small, between resumption of the service from India feels, she said, that the 000 and men. Their equip- united Nations and Economic Co-lu, N., with-almost one-quarter of operation administration officials, the human race outside it, is a as well as private business men. I bit of a farce. _______________ and post, even in Republican years. Ferguson himself neatly summed by his Chinese soldiers and said an invasion would have this dou- ble purpose: up the nature of this formula, influ- two disarmingiy frank remarks to L Dnve out mnu this reporter after the rally. Asked why he was so obvi- ously confident of beating- Taft, he replied, "Well, I sign all the checks the State of Ohio sends out, and that don't hurt me none." The state job has given him an opportun- ity, which he has used perfect- ly honestly but very shrewd- ly, to build a vast personal fol- lowing in Ohio. Ferguson revealed the second part of his magic formula when) he was asked his views of the) Brannan plan. He replied frankly that he really didn't know what it was all about, but, he continued after a moment's reflection, "If the farmers want it, I'm for it, if the farmers don't want it, I'm against it." Ferguson has been vociferous- ly in favor of everything an y large voting group, whether farm- ers or workers or veterans or old people, wants. This is not exactly a brand new rule in politics. But Ferguson has followed this rule with exceptionally single-minded devotion. Ferguson's second asset is sim- ply the nature of the man him- sell. A likeable, bouncy roan, all once affable and as combative a gamecock, he hss the instinctive! politican's friendly gregariousness. (Continued on Page 13, Cplumn 3) A1SOP ence of American imperialism. 2. "Consolidate the west line of national defense.' Barbara Tibbett Obtains Divorce Los Angeles Barbara Mc- Innes Tibbett, 27, has obtained a divorce decree after testifying that JRichard M. Tibbett, 30, son of was "very The wife testified that if she wanted kisses she had to beg for them! Firemen Squirt Errant Motorists Little Rock, Ark. The fire department at nearby Jack- sonville decided to do something about motorists who get in the way of fires. They put on a .fake fire alarm. When motorists started driv- ing over fire hose at the "scene" of the nonexistent nre, the firemen started squirting the motorists. One man took a punch at a fireman. It cost the puncher in court. ;rol board (SAGS) as a first stepj He indicated, without giving de toward getting a registration order against the party. It probably will be ready within the next two weeks or so. However, there is an almost una- nimous feeling within the govern- ment that the whole process of en- forced registration, requiring dis- YoungdahlLauds German Recovery Frankfurt, er W. Youngdahl of Minnesota, vis- iting Germany in connection with the presentation of the world umclals mv0ivea privacy yr dom bell to Berlin, said here just the public hearings that he was "impressed by the whether the party must register tails, that good progress is being made toward developing an atom- ic power plant for submarines. Asked if Russia has set off any atomic explosions since the one President Truman announced in September 1949, Dean didn't say but gave an answer imi-cu or no but gave an answej mav reporters took to be negative ability of the German people to bounce back, economically and spir- itually, from war's defeat and ruin." uaiiy, iroiu WLU a BJ.IU iu.li. aoout tne COIIVIULIUII 01 -LA wjy ytm.y The governor added in an inter- officials in New York last ysar on view that "a strong, unified Ger- charges of conspiring to overthrow many is necessary in Europe, but the government by violence. nfOCOTlfprt llTT If tirtnT-j-l a complete membership list, may take years. Plan Public Hearings Officials involved privately predict could consume as much time and effort as was required to bring about the conviction of 11 top party of A formal communique issued last night said that in the military committee meeting "agreements were reached on several important matters to be submitted to the de- fense committee." Committee Set Up The American spokesman said this meant the military commit- tee, among other things, agreed on (A) Creation of an integrated force; Creation of the office of supreme commander, although yesterday's session did not decide to recommend what nation should provide the man: (C) A supreme headquarters, probably somewhat on the pattern of the wartime SHAEF organization in Europe, with a chief of staff. Apparently no deci- sion was reached yesterday on the problem presented by Com- munist rule in East Germany first mu3t be overcome." Youngdahl is flying back to the U.S. tonight with General Lucius D. Clay. He said the dedication BUli of the freedom bell in Berlin yes-process, terday was "something I'll never Mr. Truman made the original announcement because he thought slon was reacucu the people were entitled to the in- recommending the powers granted formation, Dean said and thejtne supreme commander. President hasn't made any similar military committe announcements since. "I'll leave it to you to guess on that the chairman said. Goodyear Tire And if the board after these hear- ings orders the party to register, PfJCGS it may then appeal to the courts. The trial of the 11 consumed nine Akroni Tire .jll months of _ 1949 and that case) d Company today in- is still going tnrougn the appeals ices Qn automobiie, truck iflt-jr i toes seven one.half Based on the "subversive" list terday was somemiug j. 11 never on tne suoveisive list people massed there maintained by the attorney general, in a moving spectacle dedicated toithere are some 100 organizations The military committee did not consider the ticklish question of organizing German military units to contribute to the mutual West- em European defensive force. That question is one for the defense min- isters and foreign ministers. The American spokesman declin- ed to discuss what contributions the United States might make from its Army, Navy and Air Force. (Spec- ulation has been that from five to ten American army divisions even- tually might be sent as part of a predicted TO M 80-division total Major General EUard A. Walsh, right, of St. Paul, president of the National Guard association, greeted President Truman when the chief executive paid a surprise visit to the closing session of the association's convention in Washington this morning. CA.P. Wire- photo to The Republican-Herald.) freedom." During the day Governor Young- dahl Inspected Frankfurt universi- ty's mental clinic. The governor said he was especi- cJly interested in ihn clinic be- I cause his administration is conduct- ing a campaign to improve Minne- sota's hospitals. Safe Robbed At Sun Prairie Sun Prairie, Iffl Deputy Sheriff Thomas Peterson reported that thieves had taken in cash and in checks from the Hanley Motor Sales, Incorporated, early today. Apparently gaining LCUUCU UCUCUIAUU uj. entry through a window, the thieves deportation and also provides ten- wheeled a large safe into a room year imprisonment for any who and forced open the doors, Peter- "willfully" remain here after a de- son said. portation order. and groups in the country which he regards as Communist or Commu- nist controlled. Leaders in Custody Since none stepped up to supply the private operating data during the 30 days allowed by the new internal security act for voluntary disclosure, the assumption is that the long-drawn-out enforcement procedure will have to be invoked against each in turn, starting with the Communist party. The department's drive to get some 86 alleged foreign Commu- nist leaders into custody and then out of the country meanwhile went forward in a dozen cities. The roundup, like the registra- tion process, was started under the new security net, which permits ex- tended detention of aliens cited for with natural rubber were increased by the same amount, and white QV LllC QLLLVLLlUs, (Ji sidewaU tires were jumped up ten cently speculated upon, per cent. Increased cost of natural per cent. combined ground force.) Nor did Prices of the inner tubes made he want to say whether the United States might have upped its offer of divisions from the figures re- rubber, rayon, cotton and other ma- terials are responsible for the in- crease, the company said. It was the fifth this year. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and vicinity Fair and wanner tonight and Thursday. Low tonight 40 in city, 36 In country; high Thursday 72, LOCAL WEATHER Officials observations for the hours ending at 12 m. today: Madison, Minn., Store Burns, Loss Madison, estimat- ed damage was caused by fire last night in the Gilbertson farm store. Albert Nordstrom, manager, who gave tne loss figure, said it included two new oars, two tractors, a com- bine and other farm machinery. The fire started in an automobile body shop in the store where a cut- f.. UUU.J Oi.IUJJ AJ..L MIC J3WJ-C at ting torch was being used. Melvin ours ending at 12 m. today: iFladeboe, who came here from Will- Maximum, 58; minimum, 33; noon, jmar weeks ag0j was to tfte 50; precipitation, none; sun sets to- night at sun rises tomorrow ,t Additional weather on Page 12. is owned by Louis Gil- bertson, who also operates stores in WiUmar and Clara City.   

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