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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: October 18, 1950 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - October 18, 1950, Winona, Minnesota                              WELCOME, STATE P.-T. A. CONVENTION Editorial Page 6 Fair Tonight and Thursday; Cooler Tonight VOLUME 50, NO. 206 FIVE CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 18, 1950 TWENTY PAGES Ta I Problems ROKs In Red Fight Cap ing ital By Relman Morin Koreans said tonight their troops have fought their way into Pyongyang, the Red capital. The Korean information press said the report was made by the Pusan, South Korea, radio in a broadcast at 6 a. m. (C.S.T.X Hard-driving Republic 'Of Korea (ROK) First division troops swarmed over the Pyongyang airfield and then stormed across the Taegong river into the. Red capital, Pusan radio said. Their thrust into Pyongyang, prize goal of the massive United Nations drive, climaxed a brilliant eight-day march of nearly 90 miles. The ROKs fought hard to enter SIX BILLIONS IN U. 5. AID FOR FRANCE By John Scall U. S. of- ficials said today that France is likely to get up to In American military aid during the next three years. An American plan to allocate up to of existing ,funds to the French is just "a first install- these officials said. the U.S, First foot troopers the dty ahead of cavalry division. The American wanted to add Pyongyang to their string of historic firsts Manila, Tokyo, the linkup between the two South Korea beachheads. But the South Koreans, battling o win back the northern half of them with the Russian occupation after World War not to be stop- Irate Truckers Open Throttle On Ordinance Truck Route Cases Continued After Arrests By Gordon The temperature in Winona today- was soaring into the SO's and a part of ths unseasonable warmth .pos- iibly was being generated by a hotly- contested dispute over the intent of the city's truck routing ordinance. Under fire were (1) the amended ordinance itself, (2) the city council which drafted the ordinance and (3) the police department which is charged with enforcing it. The whole troublesome matter was long in shaping up but it ex- ploded with dramatic suddeness ped. ROKs Roll On Along the winding mountain road southeast of Pyongyang and into the capital plains, the HOKs troops rolled forward, hardly pausing. Tuesday aftemon when patrolmen score of truckers on violating truck route arrested a charges of regulations. The municipal court room hatf-filled this morning with pro- 1 testing drivers who had been sum- ,7.111 I For officers had trou- moned for arraignment on "e South Koreans charges today. if France is to build up an army of at least 20 divisions by the enc of. 1952. This reportedly is one ol the goals set by military planners to help strengthen Western Europe against Communism. President Truman and Secretary of State Acheson have put Congress on notice that rearming the North Atlantic pact countries and other friendly nations Is a long-term job. French Finance Minister Maurice Petsch? was assured yesterday of American plans to give the French almost Immediately so they can start mass production of arms in French factories in line with Atlantic pact strategy. To Meet Deficit This sum is to help meet an an- ticipated 1951 French budget deficit of caused mainly by In- creased defense spending. An authorized American spokes- man told reporters the French have been told they can expect from to Of the nearly Congress al- ready has appropriated for arms shipments. The exact total the French will receive, he said, depends upon future discussions to be carried on within the 12-nation North Atlantic treaty from running on toward the city. They surged through Red Korean opposition, sporadic at times, bit- ter at others. The mountain road was littered council. Most of the American aid will be in the form of new and modern- ized tanks, artillery, guns, planes, military vehicles, munitions and supplies shipped from the United States. American funds also will be spent to buy raw materials, machin- with Communist dead. The South Koreans wheeled past huge piles of abandoned Red arms and equip- ment. American tanks cleared a path at least part of the way for the surging RCKs. The thrust climaxed a spcctacu- ar northward drive out of the old Pusan beachhead, about 270 miles o the southeast. The battle ICT Pyongyang, which may end the war, began earlier to- day when Allied columns surged against a Red Korean defense line south and east of the city. Mack Retires As A's Manager Mack, popularized as "the grand old man of retired today as man- ager of the Philadelphia Athletics, a post he has held since 1901 when the American league was organ- ized. Mack will be succeeded as field boss of the A's by Jimmy Dykes, colorful ex-third baseman for A's and onetime manager of Chicago White Sox. ery and equipment French arms factories. needed by Blanket Motion Winona Attorney H.-.M. Lamber- ton, Jr., appeared for .each of the defendants and entered a motion for continuance1 of all of the cases for one week. Laniberton told the court that 'these are matters -of extreme im- portance ar.d several matters of law must be studied before we can deter- mine what pleas to enter 4o charges." Assistant City Attorney William Jndquist concurred in the, motion or continuance and Judge Llbera ordered that each- defendants return to Wednesday to make pleas. Background Briefly, this is the backgroun> the matter: Last December the council m amendment to tjje tn ordinance providing, In 'no firm or corporation ime operate, drive operated or driven- or semi-trailer CITY OF MORE ONE-HALF treets or public, imits of the >n certain The provide reightj or Reynolds, state P.-T.A. presi- school superintendent. Republican-Herald photo .d stage today for propaganda. He iked up by United bombarded every reach- Truman's warning to the ,g to turn them into "colonial :-to delivering policy speech War Memorial where the United was born five San; Francisco's interna- Tairport at a.m., C.S.T., last, eight-hour leg of round trip flight during1 be talked with General MacArthur on Wake is- I land about what, he said, were "dangers which still face us." "What we want is a partner- threat lesser also must be Infant Drowns In Stock Tank Near Kellogg A 15- month-old girl drowned Tuesday afternoon when she fell into a stock watering tank about seven miles south of here. Dead is Barbara Louise McKin- ney, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rob- ship for peace with all the Mr. Truman told a cheering au- dience. He said want peace Mack is 87 years His 88th birthday anniversary will be ob- served December 23. 125 M. P. H Win Lashes Mi but it must be a peace founded up- ,on justice. That American policy is European old as our republic and it is sumed to have today than ever before rer men in their our history. Arid with God's The estimates on the Red China's regular army range from to more than The North Korean Com- iami Miami, hurricane headed toward Florida's rich citl belt today after pounding Miami with 125-mile an hour winds and i mg an estimated damage in its wake. force as it pushed northward near the eastern edge of C> _ _LIH 1 rf f Sarnia avenue, East San- east of Mankato avenue; of Samia Main street north of Samia Wes Fourth street from Main streets, and .Second street Mankato avenue to Main ordinance was drafted pri- in an effort to keep heavy trucks which might causs unneces- Florida. It had passed to the west of Fort Lauderdale and the "Gold Coast' area between Miami and Palm Beach but that 70-mile strip was on the fringe and 'felt Its fury. In an advisory the Weather bu- reau said the storm was centerec about 25 miles west of Palm Beach, near latitude 26.6 north, longitude 80.4 west, moving north northwest at 12 to 14 miles per hour. "It should continue a northerly course today and gradually lose force but hurricane precautions should be continued'from the Palm Beach-Lake Okeechobee area north- ward to the TitusviUe Orlando the advisory said. Three Jets Crash Near Washington Washington Field Mr Force Base reported today that three F-86 fighter planes crashed today almost simultaneously in the Washington area. Lieutenant Joe Kent, public rela- tions officer, said two of the planes went into the Potomac river and that the third had been located by air observers in a wooded area sin Virginia. He said the plane down in Virgi- nia was inside a triangle formed by the towns of Leesburg and War- renton, Va., and Brunswick, Md. Kent said he had no information as to what might have caused a simultaneous disaster to the three planes? munist army, once now is estimated at help we intend to keep it that ay." The crowd applauded vigorously President declared "we lert McKinney. Wabasha County Coroner E. B. Wise said that death was accidental and was caused when the tot tum- bled into the tank; located on a sloping hill. According to reports the McKIn- neys were outside with their daugh- ter and age two and one-half years. They told Coroner Wise their at- tention was diverted for about ten inch Abandon Another Post In Indo-China Delegates To The Convention filled most of the seats in the Winona Senior High school auditorium this morning at the opening session. The speaker, shown at the microphone Is Thomas D. Eish- worth, radio expert from Texas and a national P.-T-A. board mem Russians Have Tru Men Under Arms American Home In Jeopardy, Says Rishworfh Opening Session Hears Reynolds Flay Amendment By Adolph Bremer The school and the home should' be building the citizens of tomorrow, (but both are functioning under [handicaps. That's the two-phase problem fac- ing the Minnesota Congress of Par- ents and Teachers as it opened its 28th annual convention here this morning. The problem was stated by a for- mer Minnesotan who now lives in Texas and by a Winonan, who is the president of the Minnesota Con- gress. Thomas B. Rishworth, Austin, Texas, who is national chairman of the committee on radio, declared the "American family is in jeopardy today" because of the speed of mo- dern living and the influences and attractions which are making the lome merely a place to sleep. Opposes Amendment And Harry Reynolds, Winonan who has been Minnesota Congress president for three years, declared shat passage of Minnesota amend- ment No. 2 November 7 would en- danger school construction and that Minnesota institutions aren't pro- ducing enough elementary teachers. As the three-day convention got under way at the Senior High school auditorium, delegates and visitors today announced abandonment of were pouring into the registration the Indo-China frontier post of center at the auditorium. They were By Saigon, Seymour Topping Dong Dang, relinquishing for the second time in 65 years her con trol of the main invasion route from China. A French military spokesman said the Dong Dang garrison withdrew yesterday, presumably 15 miles headquarters fortress of Langson. It was the fifth post the French have given up within a month along the mountainous frontier, standing in line for their creden- tials. By tomorrow, when the peak attendance will be reached, some 900 delegates and visitors will probably be here. Tomorrow is election day, too. Nominating Committee Chairman southeast to the French frontier Joe Ryan, Minneapolis, this mom- ing presented a slate, which includ- ed Mrs. David Aronson, Minne- apolis, active in P.-T.A. circles for 11 years, the current state vice- stronghold of Moscow-trained Ho president, and former vice-president Dnce estimated being cut up and increasing our armed strength destroyed by United Nations forces. because Soviet policies leave us minutes when they looked over The regular Soviet army Is esti- mated at a little above This Is the army alone. It doesn't count in perhaps of the so- called security force, the NKVD. Nor does, it include a flexible force which is seasonal in men who.are called, by age groupsj for military service. The Russian army has excellent artillery and in quantities. It dein- ino other If the choice." Soviets "really want (Continued on Page 15, Column 1) jonstrated its artillery TRUCKERS World War H. power in Mr. Truman continued, they can prove it "by living up to the principles of the United Na- tions tind "by joining the rest of the United Nations in call- ing upon the North Koreans to lay down their arms at once; and "by lifting, the iron curtain and per- mitting the free exchange of .in- formation and and, finally, towards where the two youngsters had been playing, only Michael was there. Running to the tank they found Barbara in the water. Artificial respiration was applied, but the lit- tle girl did not respond. She was born at St. Elizabeth's hospital, Wabasha, July 14, 1949, ind is survived by her parents and brother. Funeral services will be held Fhursday at 2 p. m. at the Church of Christ, Plainview, ihe Rev. Erwin A Puzzled Policeman views the little he can see of a fellow officer's car under a pile of cement blocks at Miami, Fla., this morning following the hurricane. The wall of Ray's Boatyard collapsed during the storm. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) by joining with the U. N. to estab- Marshall officiating. Burial will be lisa a system of collective the Plainview cemetery. ity "which will permit the elimi-l- Friends may call at the Foley and nation of the atomic bomb and the Lindsay chapel at Plainview tonight drastic reduction and regulation of land Thursday morning, all other arms and armed forces.' Mr. Truman declared that until the Soviet union does these things "we are determined to build up the common defensive strength of the free world." What the United States did for Korea, he said in effect, it stands ready to do, in conjunction with the United Nations, for any peace- ful country that finds its borders violated and its freedom attack- ed." 'We hate the President declared, "but we love our liber ties. We will not see them' destroy- ed The "voice of America" trans- mitters hammered home the pres- idential effort to drive a wedge between Russia and countries of the Far East by assailing Soviet Communism for making "the false claims to these peoples .that it stands for progress and human ad- vancement." Mr. Truman countered Russia's peace propaganda by tagging that I country with responsibility for fear and unrest In both Asia and in Europe, and said the United States and associated nations will contin- ue to build up their amis to re- sist attack. "The Soviet union and its coloni- al said tho President in the course of a long1 and bitter indictment, "are maintaining arm- ed forces of great size and strength. -In both Europe and Asia, their vast armies pose a constant threat of peacfc" CM Minn's nationalist guerrillas. Dong Dang squarely faced the traditional, invasion route from the walled Chinese city of Nam Quan (Chinese' gate) and a mountain pass. Except for periods of Japanese and Chinese occupation during and just after World War II, France had held the post since 1885. The withdrawal from Dong Dang eft major French frontier garri- ions only at Langson, and on the western and eastern ends of the former French border defense line Laokay and Moncay. Langson itself was reported awaiting the onslaught of the Vietminh guerrillas. Most civilians already have left the city. Rumors have been current that this and perhaps other posts will be aband- oned by the hard-pressed French. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and vicinity: Generally fair tonight and Thursday, becom- ing cooler tonight. Low tonight 54, bigh Thursday 76. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 81; minimum, 57; of the National Women's League of the United for presi- dent; Mrs. Lafe for and Mrs. S. E. Stru- ble, Wyoming, for'secretary. Voting will be in ballot boxes. The nominating committee also recommended to the state board that Mr. Reynolds be .named chairman of the extension commit- tee, 'which, would be a new position in the state organization. The Regional Luncheons convention will consist of general and group sessions. After the opening general session tills morning, the conclave separated for regional luncheons and then district meetings and workshops. Mr. Rishworth, once educational director for Radio Station KSTP m St. Paul, now is with the Uni- versity of Texas. He declared that the "American lamily is in jeopardy today; we may take again to the caves of jrehistoric man for survival. "But so long as we have i'ami- ies built on mutual trust and re- spect, families with vision enough to draw on their own resources in making our homes places for 'living 24 hours a day, families where democracy is the guide we shall survive. "No other organization Is doing more than the Parent-Teacher as- noon, 81; precipitation, none; sun sociation. to secure the future of sets tonight at sun rises to- morrow at Additional weather on Page 17. (Continued on Page 15, Column 4) CONVENTION I As The Convention of the Minnesota Congress of Parents and Teachers opened hare: Hairy M. Reynolds, Winona, president; Mrs. E. G. Quamjne, Lafayette, Ind, former Winonan who was the first state president; Thomas D. Rishworth, Austin, Texas, national radio chairman; A, Willard Carlson, president of the Winona Parent-Teacher council, and Rabbi David Aronson, Minneapolis. Bepublicin-Herald photo A -j r. 8   

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