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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: October 4, 1950 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - October 4, 1950, Winona, Minnesota                              Cold Tonight, Fair, Warmer Thursday VOLUME 50, NO. 194 FIVE CENTS PER COPY W1NONA, MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 4, 1950 TWENTY-TWO PAGES Yanks Win Series Opener, I to 0 o f ,430 Vl ,._... Citizen7 jjf JLikely to Regain U. S. Citizenship Davis today appeared likely to get back the American citizenship he renounced two years ago to become a self-styled "citizen of the world." Attorney General McGrath said yesterday he sees no reason toj oppose Davis' desire to become a I U. S. citizen again but that the. Three Gunmen To Open Safe Garretson Town Of 700 18 Miles From Sioux Falls u, U1HI.V.-. j Garretson, S. D. Three !former bomber pilot, now 29, bandits obtained tion process. I early today KOKfA Mexico Asked To Return 3 Capone Aides i jackets arid stockings pulled down jover their heads with holes cut for eyes came to the home of the bank's vice-president and cashier, Tom 'wangsness about a. m. The sheriff's report continued: The three men, all armed, de- Imanded the keys to the bank, which jWangsness produced. i Leaving one oi' them to guard the Chicago Federal and state! South Korean troops advancing along the east coast of the peninsula have taken Kosong and face opposition at Tongchon from North Koreans fighting to protect Wonsan. TJ, S. Marines took TJijongbu, north of Seoul. A motor convoy moving along the road from Antung In Manchuria to Pyongyang was spotted at Pakchon. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) South Koreans Seek Vanished Red Army forced the cashier to accompany the other wgrit to the Dank. However, mcyi i officials joined today in attempt-j werg ,maWe to get in. So they jing to round up remnants of the turned to the Wangsness I old Capone gang for questioning on two recent slayings and appear- iance before a U. S. Senate crime i committee. The committee, investigating crime in the nation's major cities, opens hearings on Chicago's un- derworld activities tomorrow. i Two former members of the old Capone mob were held in jail over- night for further questioning on I the slayings of two crime inves- j i the outside door and then make possible for the men to help them- selves to in silver and S3.280 in bills. The two bandits, still stocking-masked, took two boxes and a cash tray from the bank to carry the money out to their car. Then the two returned Wangsness to his home, hit him over the head, collected their third accomplice and jang ruled by the late notorious i in Minnesota and Iowa, Scarface Al. who reportedly flea] la South Dakota, have to Mexico to escape service of sub- as weu n fans, who haven't seen their team in World their favorites warmed up for today's opening series game against the New York Yankees. (A.P Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) Formal Conrad Attempts Reception Here j Set for Friday By Richard O'Regan Friday noon has been set as most of Austria's workers but tentative time for Winona's formal (railway stations and mounting tt.icjia.iu Communist-called general strike was shnrt.-liVed attempts uO S61Z6 Sell-Out Crowd Of Jams Park Brown's Double Scores for N. Y. In Fourth Inning Shibe Park, Philadelphia Bobby Brown's double and two long fly balls gave the New York Yan- kees a 1-0 victory today over the Phillies in the opening World ser- ies game. It was a tight pitching duel be- Itween Yankee Vic Raschi and Jim i Konstanty, Phil relief ace who was I the surprise starter. Brown's double down the left field line and long fly balls by Hank Bauer and Jerry Coleman gave the Yanks the only run of the ball game In the fourth. Brown took third on Bauer's fly to Ash- burn and scored on Coleman's fly j ball. Play-by-Play Story of Game Shibe Park, Philadelphia Following is the play by play story of the first game of the 1950 World 'series: I FIRST INNING Yankees Konst'anty's first pitch to Wcodling was low and inside for a ball. After a called strike, Kon- stanty threw three straight balls I to walk Woodling. Rizzuto singled s through the hole between third land short, Woodling stopping at secord. Berra flied to Ennis at the base of the right field wall, Wood- ling taking third after the catch. Rizzuto held first. Russ Meyer, a righthander, started warming up in the Phillies' bullpen. DiMaggio took 'a called strike, foul tipped the next pitch then raised an easy foul fly "honor Some workers ;erboro. N. J., atlcommunist call for a walkout demanding further he By Russell Brines Tokyo South Korean troops' prowled deeper into North Korea today on spearhead mis- sions feeling for the Red army that has all but vanished and gone n> v. uv poenas by the crime committee, also are wanted for similar inter-! been alerted. about CO American Army men j rof_fttion by police. along as advisers. The United Nations Allies were held back in mop-up and reserve positions in liberated South Korea. The latest Red mystery column that streamed down from the Man- silent" before them in ominously empty country. i North' Korea' was discounted They got as far as 60 miles Air porce spokesman as a yond parallel 38 as the American highway supply train and command announced the arrival jorejgn troop convoy. IT. S. Aid Asked Committee Chairman Estel Ke- fauver (D.-Tenn.) said in Washing- ton that he had asked the State, department for help in returning; three men to this country. Freezing Weather Moves Info State Reception arrangements are being handled by the Winona Flyers as- sociation and final details will be discussed by the group at a meet- ling tonight in the airport adminis- jtration building. tria's of their factories. The Red effort was expected to climax late this afternoon in a march on Vienna's governmental center. Austrian police, who Convoy Spotted The Fifth Air Force said a vehicle convoy was spotted Tues- the i Tony Accnrdo and Rocco Charles Fjschetti. brothers, j cousins of Capone. However, the _____ ir't0, Tnd I Minnesota for the first time this and if all, with the inercury dropping to >5 above last night at Wfflmar, in spent the night violence friends at Old Town. Maine, andi Meanwhile small crowds of Reds picked up equipment left there on several federal rail-; his trip to Europe. way stations in the heart of Jie: v r IT, T'lRnnQ At'! However, the three are th not western Ivimuesota for the me uuec aic i-epresemauve aium ius uiot-iiuL charged with any extraditable of-jreadmgof the nignt. Minnesota in Congress, and a, cousin of Max's, ami it was uncertain what! St. Cloud, in central Minnesota nrincinal sneaker at the Far East of a new reinforcing tr. S. third to join the Korean fighting if nee- essary- day night by two Allied B-2G pi- But still the penetration column was moving north of 38 was composed solelyjsouth Dear pakchon, about salcl ne n0pes me -.-HIUC Th i-tt.r of fighting Korean nationals with northwest of the North wU! request the Mexican (border, had 'rean capital, Pyongyang. Presumably it was the same col IS trip 1O .CiUIUJJC. wnj He was expected to call Winona j Russian zone and in Vienna. from New York this afternoon at which time definite arrangements for the reception were to be made. Charles Kersten, Milwaukee, form- representative from his district Red Convoy Near Pyongyang By Leif Erickson U.S. Fifth Air Force Headquart- attempts to seize to Waitkus outside the first tase- line Mize flied to Ennis in short factories heeded the right. No runs, one hit, no errors, two left. Phillies Rascbi's first pitch 1o Waitkus cut the heart of the plate for a called strike. Woodling slam- med into the lower barrier in left field while chasing Waitkus' foul fly and appeared hurt. After a brief I rest Woodling returned to his post. j Waitkus fouled out to Berra behind I the plate after working the count i to three and two. Ashbuni bunted :to the left of the mound. Raschi up quick to throw him out at first. Raschi speared Sisler's high i chopper back to the mound and tossed him out at first. No runs, no hits, no errors, none left. SECOND INNING Yankees Ennis raced over to light-center to gather in Brown's 25 above said he hopes the State on the and International extreme northern be the principal speaker at I the program here. TODAY- N. Gives Reds Time To Reg By Joseph Alsop umn 'that AHied planes attacked j earlier Tuesday. The Air Force said bad weather prevented effective attacks Wed- nesday on the vehicles. General MacArthur's headquar-j tors announced the Third division had arrived in the Far East com- mand from the American west coast. A spokesman would not say where or when. I But it obviously had movement j orders before the war took a de- 'cisive turn in mid-September. j Official sources declined again] to say whether Americans and oth-j ,ler United Nations liberation forces 'I would ioin the South Koreans government to try to ask tnem to le.ave. find them j town reported the W with .02 inch of moisture. St. Poelten, astride the railroad route from Vienna to the west, workers "rejected" a Communist, attempt to interrupt work, the Aus-lers, Korea The Fifth Airj trian press agency reported. (Force said a convoy of 150 Com-j Russ Help Strikers Imunist vehicles was spotted Tues-j out at 1 in Vienna's Russian zone, north-day night by two Allied B-26 --ifly. ilamner gathered in Bauer's i Force said a convoy of 150 Com- roller and barely threw him made a nice foul fly near No runs, no he program here. In Vienna's ._....._ Luncheon at the Hotel of the Danube river, 50 miles northwest oi the no, errors, none left. 1 ii--i..i ni backed up to ijUncheon at uie LUC will follow a short program at the the Communists out o. Korean capitr.l of Pyongyang. airport and a caravan into town, be obtained at the Wisconsin Air Lines Would Serve Winona Tickets can hotel desk. an attempt to take over the Stad- _f h grass to field Ennis' bounder t.hA assistant ll m''y De I__j nut at. first.. Jones ciding what to do with victory has already revealed a really shocking breakdown in American policy making. As long as a week ago. the main North Korean armies were visibly disintegrating. Seoul fell on Wed- strength in the war is six divisions plus ._. combat team, British, Australian and Philip- pines ground forces also are in South Korea. Thai and French units have been assigned to the itcBiofiiib. units nave nesday; the last pockets of resist- operation ance were eliminated South Koreans captured Kosong, and the liberation of the city airijne north of the border pompously celebrated on Friday. ialong east coast. patrols stab- on Sunday General MacArthur bed still farther north, published his surrender demand. And today, Monday, the South Ko- reans have crossed the 38th paral- lel in force, yet no one will admit thev have been ordered to do so by' the United Nations supreme commander. One of the first rules of war is that any victory must be relentlessly followed up, with all possible speed and strength, in order to the enemy from recovering ....s balance. A more flagrant violation of this simple rule than the events of the past week, would be hard to imagine. We should have been after the enemy like a hungry lynx. Instead we have behaved more like a cat in a bed of catnip. And the delay and indecision about crossing the 38th parallel have created many needless dan- gers Washington Wisconsin Central Airlines has asked the Civil Aeronautics board to give it a new route between Chicago and Minneapolis-St. Paul by way of Betoit-Janesville, Mad- ison and La Croose, Wis., and Rochester and Winona, Minn. In Ihe same petition filed yesterday the airline asked that the board defer until next May 1 any further steps in a proceeding to determine wheth- er Wisconsin central's certifi- cjtc as a scheduled airline should be renewed. The certif- icate, which has passed its ex- piration date, continues in ef- fect until the board acts. The board recently decided to defer a decision in a related case, known as the Michigan- Wisconsin service until it acts on Wisconsin Central's re- newal. Wisconsin Central asked the hoard to eliminate from its routes ,16 cities which the air- line said are not being served because of inadequate airports. They arc Waukegan, Racine- Kenoska, Waukesha, Water- tottii. Baraboo-Portage, A s h- laml. Fond du Lac, Appleton, Sheboysan and Manitowoc, Wis., 'and Little Falls, Grand Rapids and Virginia-Evelcth, Minn. It mav be rjart oi uie night and on the route from Vienna to by Allied aircraft. Verne Armstrong, president of the.ui. flyers association, said that ar- islava, in Czechoslovakia, ran'gements still are being made to Groups of Communists clashed i Pilots reported the column have the Winona High school baud at the airport when Conrad lands Conrad's family arrived in New lv communists were jailed and York aboard the liner Liberte Tues-jthe attempt to halt streetcar traf- half hour before the song- failed. In the Russian sectors of writer-pilot touched United States soil at Caribou. 300 miles from Seven Islands, Quebec, landed. where he first Last night he addressed the East- ern Maine Aero association at city, however, police were unable to do anything about scattered in- terference with streetcar traffic. The police there were warned by Russian officers no! to interiere ._. at first. Jones sent a high pop to Berra in front of the plate. Hamner rolled out, wasiRizzuto to Mize. No runs, no hits, no errors, none left. THIRD INNING lined a sing'e s_ y_e outstretched glove of th ang. It was near Pakchon Tues-1 lu__ging Kamner. Woodling walked dav irg'it Ion four pitched balls. Meyer re- thei The Air Force said bad weather sumed wanning up _iri the Phils s clashed; h on tne Wgnway iead- r workers' ,B on Red China's with police and streetcar f at three points in the worn mitu n sector of Vienna early today. Thir-jManchuria border, toward Pyongy- tfae outstretched gi0ve of th Bangor, Maine, before flying to strikers. ITowne. i Elsewhere in Trans oceanic flying "gets a I tie lonesome, but it's easier than! .vorkeis were prevented effective daylight' Wed- nesday attacks on the convoy seen last night. Only 24 sorties could be flown in the rains Wednesday. Fifth Air Force pilots reported bullpen. Waitkus fielded Rizzuto's -he right of the mound and threw to Goliat at first who made a fine catch of the low throw to retire the batter. Both runners ad- vanced on the sacrifice. Sisler came -x.. m fast to catoh Berra's fly in short Vienna socialist they destroyed or damaged 85 sisler wfls playing with a heav- taking a strung (and other vehicles Tuesday. An Air taped right wrist. DiMagsio was ._ r.cfm-te fni_ rmssed to load the bases. Only Men Ready to Serve Wanted in Active Reserves stand against the Red efforts spokesman said the column get them out on strike, jwas no_ to be a troop con- Socialist workers in power a lot of people Max told an interviewer at Old Town. The series of Atlantic hops was made in weather Conrad said was rainy and cold. His trip to Europe and back was made within a month. He left Paris last Thursday, flying I Bed organizers were the northern route by way of Ice-1the city, visiting a 1 key saJd Major land, Greenland and Labrador. tipns in hopes of finding support purposely passed to load the bases. Mize, swinging at one of what ap- peared to be Konstan.ty's palm pitch, raised a meek pop to Jones Bocnuibi woiwa m _ d a meek to jones has been a steady move- U No U. one hit, "'phS went down Manchuria border south all through of the game Goliat sent Music to be played from a sound ei truck during the caravan from Wi- nona's airport to the hotel will be records of the two new songs writ- Iten by Conrad. The procession will stop long enough for Max to speak briefly and I will then move to the hotel for the luncheon. Seating will be limited to 150. Vinson (D.-Ga.) said today no one even a hold a commission in the active reserves unless he can ready to reach for his tin hat when the (military re bugle blows Moreover, there is no excusing this indecision and delay on the wound that the Korean victory carne unexpectedly. The plans for the Inchon landing were complet- -d and fully communicated to the joint chief of staff more than a month ago. The central principle was that the immensely risky land- ing operation, if successful, would (Continued on Fags 17, Column 1.) Wisconsin Rapid s Paint Plant Destroyed in Fire Vinson de-1 Force representatives said thatj Air Force branch had called up reserve epresentauves. Icfficers and reserve airmen He noted that Congress appro-jand sent to duty officers and priates for a reserve] airmen. training program. ___ _. In questioning! The Air Force said it had defer- scin.B.dves during thelred 772 officers and airmen, developed that was told that the Air Force VlnsoTtold a reporter he hopes j of" the" services has" a system byitransfers a man to the l2 House armed services commit-which it can keep tabs on ji re-jyolunteer__reserve if he must be tee which he heads will prod the armed services into "screening" their organized reserves. His object is to weed out all those not available to fill a. uni- form when needed even if they are congressmen, industrialists, prominent names. He particularly wants the serv- ices to set up a method to trans- fer reservists drawing drill pay to the inactive reserve unless they are available for service servist's avilability to serve if ed. He noted that since signing up a man may have married, acquired a number.of dependents or moved into an essential job. Vinson's committee has been holding hearing's on the armed services manpower needs with a view to suggesting draft act changes to Congress when it re ices don't know if a man can serve until he is called up. "What we want is somebody who corps representatives were called "Why spend money unless weitoday. know we are going to get men In response to his questions Air Hurricane Moves Info Atlantic Miami, Fla. Bermuda and the Carolina coast relaxed today as a small put severe hurricane turn- ed northward and sped up the open bv Gill Wisconsin Rapids, r-------- ploding drums of turpentine and Paint Company building from shortly after midnight to dawn Firemen from six Wisconsin towns were roused from bed to fight blaze. But because of the Intense heat theirefforts (avail and by the time the sun came up the warehouse and factory build ling, which extends the length of a, small city block, was a charred ruin. names whipped into the air ;t-i- ctill cf.nnfl. i m IT a rnor nf thP f irP_ Woodling.back to the left field wall for his long fly. It was the first ball hit out of the infield by a Philadel- phia batter. Raschi threw out Kon- stanty to retire Philadelphia's bat- jting array in order. No runs, no 'hits, no errors, none left. FOURTH INNING smashed a two- i bagger just inside the third base iline. Ashbum raced into deep cen- drive. Brown easily made third Atlantic. Only its brick front still stood. Ted Gill, manager of the com- pany, said early today he had not yet 'been able to make an estimate of the damage. 150 feet. Over the roar of- the fire itself came the sharp reports of exploding drums. Some of them were thrown 100 feet into the air. A crowd gathered to watch the can do some fighting do some west of Bermuda and picked up flvine when h e said, forward speed as it veered.north- The season's seventh hurricane, packing winds up to 100 miles an hour near the center, passed to the west of Bermuda and picked up _ f A Cl'OWu gauicreu tu The first alarm was toned iri at but were no in- a. m. The local fire ]_uries am0ng onlookers or firemen, ment responded immediately, then a sent out a call for help from neigh- By 6 S off the South Carolina Wfi sid ha realy is the reserve 10 has UllivlJUCo Lu vv iu i convenes November 27. Marine been filled up with congressmen, as rady Norton, chief storm fore- has oaster.at Miami, said the hurricane federal employes, men in industry, whom you know in case of an emergency you can't use." would clear all land south of Cape Hatteras and might even swing wide of Long Island and the New Eng- land coast. boring towns. Contingents from Nekoosa, Port Edwards, Rudolph, Stevens Point and Biron answered the appeal. The number fighting the fire finally mounted to between 50 and 60 men. However, the heat generated by LUC iicai. _- turpentine, cold tar solvents and combustive elements in the paint prevented the firemen from making any appreciable dent in the fierce burned Itself out and succeeded in concentrating it in one section of the building. Wisconsin Rapids Fire George Staley said he was not sure of the fire's cause, but suspected it came from a short in an electric Pour years s.go the same building was burned after it was hit lightning. It was fully insured. after the catch. Coleman flied deep to Sisler, Brown scoring after the (Continued on Page 17, Column 4.) WORLD SERIES WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and and cool tonight with frost or freezing temperature. Thursday fair and warmer. Low tonight 36 in city, near freezing in country. High Thursday 68. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 51; minimum. 35; 50; precipitation, trace; sun sets tonight at sun rises tomorrow Additional weather on page 17.   

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