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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: September 25, 1950 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - September 25, 1950, Winona, Minnesota                              Fair and Warmer Tonight and Tuesday VOLUME SO, NO. 186 FIVE CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA, MONDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 25, 1950 The Proof of FM Superiority Is In Hie Listening EIGHTEEN PAGES eou I U. S. Narcotics Agent Killed in St. Paul Raid Hixton Farmer Drowns Trying To Rescue Boy Child Pulled To Safety by Farm Woman Hixton, Wis. Hakes, 42, a farmer, drowned near here about p.m. Saturdayjwno was driving one of the cars, Hixton Crash Injures Eight Hixton, Wis. Eight persons were injured, four serious- ly in a two-car collision on high-j way 95 detour near here Sunday atj a.m. I Most seriously hurt was Sandra jHolman, ten, who suffered a frac- Itured skull and broken leg. She re- covered consciousness this morning in a Black River hospital. Her phy- 'sician said her condition is still serious. Sandra's aunt, Miss Ruth Hoi- man, Shady Glen school teacher, while trying to rescue a five-year- old boy who had fallen Into a creek. The tot, Tommy Thomasgard, was pulled to safety by a farm woman, Mrs. Leonard Casper. Meanwhile, Hakes, who could not swim, had gone under. When he was located under the water and brought to shore, he was dead. Hakes' body was recovered by Vernon Zimmerman, 26, of Good- view, who was flagged down while driving on the nearby road. also is hospitalized with a severe head cut and bruises. Her condi- tion was termed fair. Also in fair condition are Mr. and Mrs. Richard Bitters, Alma Jenter. Mr. Bitters, who was driv- ing the other car, received a skull fracture and rib fractures. His wife suffered a broken pelvis and seven fractured ribs. The Bitterls' daughter, and Mrs. with -in Khieaick ana.her cUU- A Man Who Gave His -Vane as John Wong, 49, St. Paul, lies critically wounded m a at St. Paul a'ter raid in which A. M. Bangs, chief of the U. S. Narcotics bureau for the Minneapolis area, was latally shot In a statement given to Ramsey county authorities, Narcotics Agent Joseph Waiberg said Wong shot him and Bangs after giving them a Jar of opium. No formal charge had been flled against Wong The nurse is Mary Lou Fogarty. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) who were in the Bitters car I Mrs. Edwin Thiele with whomjwere released from the hospital jTommy lives three miles from j Sunday alter receiving treatment fhrcmC but had gone down to the water! anyhow. The Thomasgard boy slip- ped into the creek. Mrs. Thiele said Do-.iald came yelling to the house for help. Meanwhile, Hakes, a World War n veteran, and his father, George, Hakes, heard the cries. Walter i j Hakes jumped into the water while I his father went to the .Thiele home to get aid. When Mrs. Thiele got to the creek, she called to Mrs. Casper, who was driving by, and Mrs. Cas- per waded out to rescue the boy. Missing B-50 Found, 16 Men Aboard Safe Wedges JOocate two main Allied spearheads that are now only 40 air miles apart as they drive to close a trap on tens of thousands of North Koreans south of Seoul. Arrows locate main Allied drives in the southeast beachhead and in Seoul The Allies are driving on Seoul from three sides, with Marines holding the high ground in the Tongmaksana district west of south mountain, Red defense stronghold! (A.P. Wirephoto to The Kepublican-Herald.) No Letup After Korean Victory ear Heart of City Site of Bitter Delaying Battle Columns Racing From South Now 40 Miles Away BULLETIN Tokyo A U.S. Army spokesman in Tokyo said to- day thit Seventh division troopu had captured South Mountain, the 700-foot Ml! around which much of Seoul is built, and that. Marine and Army patrols haci made contact inside Seoul. By LciC Erickson Allied columns [fought deep into Seoul tonight on a (grinding drive for 3uk Soo palace janci the nearby government build- ing cluster. One U. S. Marine column that crossed the Han river Sunday first planted the Stars and. Stripes by nightfall on a southwest district height less than two miles from the palace. Then a Seventh division dough- bov column stormed over the Han in'dawn mists Monday and fought to knock the Bed Korean defenders off the commanding heights of south mountain, a city park. Two other columns of American and South Korean Marines stabbed I into the capital from the west and north. A. P. Correspondent Don White- head who crossed the Han last Wednesday with Fifth regiment Marines and Sunday with First regiment leathernecks, said gran- iite-waUed Duk, Soo is considered the heart of the capital. The other government buildings slightly I to the north. Victory Seen Soon Corn Damage Studied First Severe Frost Kills Garden Crops By Al Oison Fall and frost came to the Winona area almost hand-in-hand over the weekend. nded Saturday and by early Sunday morning the Second Wounded, Chinese Held Under Hospital iVwas6 tte j Washington-m-No !et-up in the nation's military preparednewj they and .Jerry BurnsenilG men aboard alive. A. Tj. S. Air, drlve_even aiter victory in promised by Secretary of Com- O02fjdent Allied force .y Force team hopes to evacuate the merce Sawyer. _ _ 'win wiuita hours. t St. Paul t colics jwounded in I learned that Walter Hakes had co- hered the water. I It was at this moment that Mr. I Thiele, who had Joined the group 'at the creek, spotted Hakes' cap iin the water and the group saw was about tea feet deep. Zimmerman, who was driving on the road through the Shady Glen area toward Black River Falls, was stopped by Thiele and asked if he could swim. Zimmerman en- itered the water and brought survivors by helicopter today. The Royal Canadian Air fbrce said an R.C.A.F. Lancaster spotted the plane some 95 miles southwest of Goose- Bay. and a Sunday morning opium raid on a downtown hotel jhere. i Four of them wounded !in an exchange with the agents The U. S. Air Force at e even channel more productive facilities and materials to armament Sawyer was asked in a radio in- terview last night if the United States could properly relax rearm- Goose Bay began immediate pre- parations to evacuate the 12 crew- men and four passengers, missing on a routine flight from Goose Bay to Tucson, Ariz. All are mili.ary personnel. A helicopter is expected to make the tricky flight today to pick up the survivors and transfer them to were tasen mio CUSIOQJ. Itered the water and brought me survivors ana warmer uieiu-w Killed by a bullet through to shore. Artificial respira-the shore of a nearby lake. An am- ____ A T Aft r-VlioT i ___1 -3 1__ i wi nrt fl A Till O Til Q Will f 1 V LO Killed cy a ounei inrouSn to snore. Aruiiciai reapua-uic ui H tn nonr tenoeratures in most places !heart was A. M. Bangs, 50, chief jtion was applied by Burnsen andjphibian plane fly them to rf flowers and'ol the U. S. Narcotics bureau for cthers untifa resuscitator arrived Goose Bay. The frost was general-killing com Northwest area. Joseph Win-jfrom Black River Falls. I It was presumed evacuation could with a death blow missed 27. a-narcotics agent, was shot! zirnmerman, who is employed completed toasy, barring bad and' rJnped still more i through the i Winona by the Green Bay Winona CountyTgentE. V.John- Jota Wong. 50, is held under iera Railway, lives in Goodview Finding of the missing air giant 'son. and other agricultural agents guard in a hospital He was wound-j 885 41st avenue_He had been visit-j climaxed Peace or War Up To Stalin By Stewart Alsop AVashington Josef Stalin is now in the position of a man who is losing a very large bet. For Sta- son and other agricultural agents guard in a nospitai. was iisi avenue. t in the Winona area, agreed today !d five, times. Doctors -id both a brother, Everett, near Aima mg ftom of to that effect of the frost won': be wounded men have a chance to i center. known until later this week whenirecover. a more thorough check can be] Bang, Winbeg and a third age made The'Thomasgard child suffered adian and American planes took I Ban? WinBeg ana a tmra ageuMno ill effects from his experience, (part in the hunt. IVir-il Marnuson, found Wong he could not swim, Smoke signals attracted the Lan- i b __ ____ _ ________i wnt-noiii .jflnt-f- tn flip n.vpa VjnPrp the In He even hinted that new business; controls may expected so as to ament efforts when the fight in Ko- rea is won. His answer: "My opinion is that we cannot and should not and will not." The secretary went on to say that this country would be stupid to believe that "we can forget the whole thinK go about our nor- mal peacetime pursuits regardlsssi of what is going on in the rest of the world." Sees More Controls Sawyer said he expects more con- trols on business to be necessary. He While the four-prOnged drive Jn- the city pushed ahead, a TJ.S. !First cavalry armored patrol i sweeping up from-the south sped iinto Chongju. This put toem only 140 miles from the Inchon-S e o u 1 beachhead. Its swift drive 70 miles in four days threatened soon to close the gap between the two fronts and seal tens of thousands of Red Koreans in the south. Allied forces scored sharp gains [all along the southeastern front, i from YongdoU on the Sea of Japan to Chinju on the southwest. But Allied commanders were greatest weight of manpower into the battle to secure Onalaska Man Killed in Mishap Near Whitehall Whitehall, McGrath, 39, father of five chil trols on business to oe necessary, didn't say when, however. didn't get any sleep Satur- symbolic Seoul. nnssihilities he listed (1) "Per-idav afternoon before starting his! The Keds captured the South K.O in Onalaska, Wis. flde wajrnuson, iouna wui-g fi-umiuiougii nt; J1 three othe- men in a hotel room, managed to remain afloat. He was i caster to uif area wnere uic ia Across the nver, ;n Some were smofc- taken to a Black Hiver Palls hos- survivors had constructed a shelter. tff ins Leavfng MasLson to rftaMr observation but was re-Signs on the Rocky ground asked ;county agents said the frost was a simdav. for food and supplies. No medical bad one. too, the results are being surveyed. Some farmers in Buffalo county, near Alma, reported at least a. quarter of an inch of ice on corn stalks and garden crops Sunday morning. the other three, Bangs Sunday. guarc. i.llt: uuici mice, ,t, Winbe" took Wong to his own room i Jackson County Coroner Sidney supplies were requested. Officials in- wlut i-eiiuisiuumms, aiumus" after Fie told them he had more Jensen of Hixton. who was called terpreted Ihis as signifying no one is a rather drastic remedy and. we i i i _ _LI_ _ n Sri lATolr DT- "Hn -Trn r. Uo f-lTir. i if I to the creek, said Walter Hakes opium there. ito the creek, said "He into the closet by drowning. !brought out this jar of opium." said Funeral services en in a statement from hisJTuesday at p.m. As possibilities he listed (1) "Per-jday afternoon before starting his haps" a halt in manufacture of cer- raidnlght paper delivery route. tain articles requiring materials needed for military operations, and (2) "Probably" priorities requirini; a manufacturer to fill a military order before filling any other order. Sawyer, whose department has supervision over the National Pro- duction authority, also said: "There may be orders which deal with requisitioning, although that _.. Sunday about 7 a.m. Mc-kwept eastward across the Seoul- Grath apparently lell asleep at thejsuwon road sad jumped the Han wheel of his truck about j southeast of the city. three miles north of here andj was killed when the vehicle over-! gamble 'hospital bed Many a farmer's garden hose was "Bangs asked him if that was all tain to fail, sooner or later, he decide to cut his losses? !t. Jtor ota- Many a KO-'-UCIL v.tio tsangs abiteu liiiu 11 LIIAO O.IL wm i- now cer- blocked with the mercury ne had. He reached back and whip- by his parents, tn ,1 (T.ir-i riranro-ti "RnVpc: O] jPresbyterian church. Military rites conducted. He is survived was badly hurt. j won't undert ake News of the discovery came will be heldla shaky Air Force wireless at the Hixton! muffled by static. I cause of the crash remained un- Warns Of Hoarding Or ped out a gun. Mr. and Mrs. George Hakes; one sister. Mr? Ir- ciimD. 'pea out gun. Wmona the temperature I "We both jumped him and he win Randow, and one brother, Har- i. i. AV.X T -fnii t-ho nf fl.rpa. ,ic me first" and I fell :ind the old, all of the Hixton area. will hs double the bet, by for the low Saturday nightjthree of us were in the closet asd milling Soviet power in an attemptjHowever, that reading is around he shot to regain what has been lost? atop The Republican-Herald in downtown Winona. No one pretends to know how con-iand Bangs flnally pulled out ,ese peace-or-war question, will hp shnfc determined. The plane had a gaso- line supply to last 17 material mvolved will be ssized other authorities an mally the flight from Goose Bay hpdrancv whatever was dead. Tucson would take 12 hours. without any Hesitancy whatever. damage in FROST TWISTED ITS TAIL these peace-or-war questi be answered. What follows is attempt to reconstruct the motives Thc frost to hit and intentions which led up to the, county in general, do- attack Korea, and the reactions! ing of the men in the Kremlin since iancis. the atrgression started. The Kremlin decided many months ago to concentrate on the rapid conquest of Asia, in obedience to Lenin's dictum: "Let us look toward the East; the Kast will help us triumph in the West." Here the evi- dence, which rests on remark- ably complete intelligence re- ports of a meeting of top As- iatic Communist leaders in Pe- king last December, is abso- lutely solid. At this meeting, which was rath- er fiimsily disguised as a confer- ence of the World Federation of Tro.de the strategy for Asia was laid down. Six nations South Korea, Lido-China, Siam. Malaya, Indonesia and the Philippines were declared ripe for "liberation." The means of conquest were to be a naked struggle for Communist military domination in each coun- try. China, North Korea ar.d Mon- golia were to provide secure bases for this struggle. Liu Shao-chi, considered a prob- anle successor to Chinese Commu- nist leader Mao Tse-tung, made no bones about the military nature of this strategy: "Armed straggle can, and must, be the main fcrm of the peoples' liberation move- ment. The three Russian dele- gates to the conference, Beisenov, (Continued on Page 16, Column 1) ALSOP _............ his The three other men were booked, on charges of suspicion of murder land as material witnesses Two Girls Killed In Hatfield Crash He explained that this power will used three days after they across parellel 38 on June LuumyiiL Payel iinvaded Rcross parellel 38 on Instead he built a dog house __ just three months ago. his family's new pet at their home! The U. S. and South Korean in fantrymen of the Seventh division turned. He was found pinned under wreckage of the truck on high- way Mayor Knute Amble and Dr. S. W. Sim- orison of Whitehall, starting out on a hunting trip. By the time Trempealeau Coun- Sheriff Charles Keilholte and other authorities arrived, however, ivitnout any nesuancy wnaiever. i------ ui- ,._ij pivilinn I Dr. Simonson and Maj'or Amble Officials had suspected all IxpecM taut there Ts no Jacked the overturned truck up and the plane was down not far from ['ces needed' 7'nhtine Pulled McGrath out. He never re- the start of its flight, since it had why all needed P consciousness, however. station after His 'body was crushed beneath not reported to any its takeoff. Two Winona area men were still enjoying living in "the ihad he DOOKeCJ, jiiuuaiu uit; murder j HatficJd. Minn. girls j which was found Sunday about 100 i. Knusselbrink, 20. and miles southwest of Goo.se Bay, La- LltlU SUILC1UU lluttu TWO winuiia inea. ineii He estimated thai, national out-i MCGrath left Onalaska at mid- jaboard the wrecked B-50 bomber put currently is vunning at a Saturday, driving first to CiinrfiTT iViniif 1 flfl nf flflrt nrtH "fa f   the accident occurred Whitehall being his next delivery stop. Mrs. home base of the awaiting the return of her husband on an emergency leave. "No one can ever know George's safety she is quoted by The Associated Press as saying. "It is as II my life were starting over again. All my life had been sapped out of me last Mon- day when I knew my sister's hus- band was dying. He died Tuesday. "My husband was coming home on emergency leave because of this she continued, "and the shock that he, too, might be dead is beyond description. I'm afraid I went to pieces. "I prayed and prayed and I be- lieve it was these prayers that were said Mrs. Marsolek. New Checks on Reds Await 5-Man Board Truman faced today the ticklish poli- tical problem of naming a five-man board to fill a key hole in enforce- ment of the new Communist control act he roundly denounced. Congressional enactment of the law over Mr. Truman's veto brought at Tucson. prompt p_ledge to enforce it "vigorously" from Attorney General Both outfits were started inland without delay to join in the fight- ing. This was the picture within Seoul: The Seventh division fought to- ward south mountain, the msin Red defensive position in the south- ern section. t To the west, .the Marine First regiment seiztd the highes'. points in the Tong Mak Sang From these, they poured and artillery fire into Red p on soula mountain and i.u iv 'vigorously" from Attorney General bomber, wasJMcGrath. who like the President had opposed it. 'ibandl But McGrath's Justice department can take no action under one of the bill's major calling for registration of Communist! what organizations and their til establishment of a Subversive Activities Control board That board of five more than three of whom can be from the same political de- cide after hearings whether or not an organization is .required to regis- ter ander the iaw. It will act upon complaints by the Justice 'depart- ment. Government attorneys likely to be concerned with the enforcement problem said no consideration ,had been given so far to the possible personnel. The law was not put on the sta- I on souia mountain sprawling Seoul army barracKb. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST tute books until late Saturday when the Senate voted, 57 to 10, to over- ride Mr. Truman's strongly-worded, veto. Only ten Democratic senators voted to sustain the President's veto. The lone Senate Republican supporter ot Mr. Truman' Senator Langer of North Dakota, had col- lapsed of, exhaustion in the pre- dawn hours Saturday after assail- ing the bill for Winona and vicinity: Genera, y fair and and Tues_ day. Low day hours hours 12 in for the 24 today: i, 43; noon, hors and a weather on Page 11.   

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