Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: August 15, 1950 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - August 15, 1950, Winona, Minnesota                            Warm Tonight, Local Showers Wednesday Night- Want to Vote? Register Now at City Recorder's Office VOLUME so, NO. isz FIVE CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 15, 1950 Trempealeau Explosion Injures 2 Super Income Tax Studied Sales Levy or Transactions Charge Sought Excess Profits Law Expected to Be Effective Jan. 1 Washington tax law writers today weighed the Daughter Born to Princess Elizabeth possibility of putting a super-tax In London Princess Eliza- necologist. and by John H. Peel, beth, heiress presumptive to the'Vernon F. Hall and Sir John Wen% British throne, gave birth royal family's physician, to her second daughter. I Queen Elizabeth had arrived just1 The baby came at a.m.ia few minutes before the birth of a.m. An official second grandchild. j nouncement was issued one hour! The little princess was born in: and four minutes later. Princess Elizabeth's Queen Anne The baby princess weighed six j style bedroom in Clarence Congressional pounds' an announcement [the home of Elizabeth and Philip! disclosed. jnot Jar from Buckingham palace. The royal birth provides a sis-jShe is the first royal baby to bei 1951 on war-inflated incomes individuals as well as upon the excess profits of corporations. Moreover, in a search for new revenue, the tax-framing Senate fi- ter playmate for 2l-month-o 1 diborn there. Prediction Taft, Lucas Will Lose Election Doubted Farm Economist Predicts Over-All Gain for Republicans Washington The politicians This Aerial Photo shows the Canada Steamship Lines cruise ship S. S. Quebec, smoldering at its dock at Tadoussac, Quebec, after 475 passengers and crew members left the ship. The steamer caught fire five miles from the dock and just managed to speed into a landing before it was enveloped in flames. Three persons are reported missing. tA.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) nance committee ordered its staff to explore the possibilities of: 1. A national wholesale or retail sales tax. 2. A national transaction! levy, which might be an ex- pansion of the retail sales tax idea to put a tax on each trans- action for goods or services. Chairman George (D.-Ga.) said the staff also will study proposals that new excise levies be put upon nonessentlal goods, to discourage buying. The finance committee voted not to make an excess profits tax on corporations an addition to Presi- dent Truman's "first! Installment" tax boosting bill, but told its staff to prepare proposals for such a levy to be effective Jan> uary 1, 1951, with Its possible, ex- tension to individuals and partner- ships. Senator Hoey a com- mittee member, said "I think the committee action gives notice to all corporations that In all prob- ability an excess profits tax will be enacted next year effective Jan- uary 1, 1951." There Still remain- ed the possibility of a Senate floor ftpht to put an excess profits tax on corporations Into the present bill. Chairman George said the finance committee and the House ways and means commit- tee will meet in November and De- cember to work on the "second In- stallment" tax measure, regard- less of whether Congress is in ses- sion at the time. George told reporters the idea of extending the excess profits levy to individuals is "an effort to pre serve people with fixed and limit- ed incomes who would be crush' ed by making regular income tax rates higher and higher." "If we're to save our whole sys- tem, we've got to preserve the middle income George said. "We can't crush them." George did not elaborate on what is contemplated in the way of an excess profits levy on indi- viduals. Charles, next in line to his Her beaming father home affected took with a grain! mother in succession to the British leave from royal Navy salt today a prediction by Louis throne. imediately telephoned the news Bean that Tqft (R The new princess becomes thirdiKing George VI, who is in at Senators Taft in line of succession. A bulletin issued by the physicians said: liana on a grouse shooting and Lucas wil! royal1 tion at Balmoral castle. down to defeat in the November Princess Margaret also is In election. visiting friends. I Bean, a Department of Agricul-i Her Royal Highness Elizabeth, duchess of Prince Charles spent the morn- was safely delivered of a princess'ing playing as usual with economist who has attracted, at a.m. Her royal highnesslnurse. j attention by his political predic- and her daughter are both doing) A patient and growing crowd in the past, forecast in a Loo'iC well." (several hundred had waited article that Republicans The bulletin was signed by Sir.'pectantly outside Elizabeth's (M_ ,.__ throughout the morning. l s >ear-s out William Gilliatt. the won't win control of Congress. Of Arms Burns to Waterline For u. S., Britain Workmen Badly Hurt in Fire At Schoolhouse I Caledonia Federated School Structure Wrecked by Flames Trcmpcalcau. Wis. (Special! Two Tivmpealeau workman were seriously burned here Uiis afternoon when mi explosion followed by fire wrecked the Caledonia Federated school, four tiii.'e.s eaM of here on highway 93. The men. Kenneth Drugan and Edwin Ryder, both of Trempealeau, were sanding floors in the two-room ;schoolhouse when the chemical used I in removing the varnish exploded land set the building afire. j Both men fled from the school I house with i heir clothing in jRydrr was seriously burned on the jhead, body and arms. His hair was aflame as he emerged from the [burning structure. His companion, i Mr. Drugaii, was less seriously bUrn- but nevertheless suffered'critical burns, observers said, at Necedah As Woman Reports Vision of Virgin Mary Necedah, back-country farm woman said today that at I the stroke of noon she was granted a vision of the Virgin Mary, ing to her for the seventh time. A multitude estimated officially at j nearly persons gathered for the occasion. c Mrs. Mary Anna van Hoof said the mother of God appeared to her (defeat. and told her: Pray and pray hard. The time is short.' Bean's prediction that Tadoussac. 7.000-ton cruise ship Quebec burned' Both men were taken by ambu- to the waterline last night alter racing aflame in the St. Lawrence Bailee to a LH Crosse 'hospital. .__ river to land safely some 600 persons aboard. 'Neighbors were called to the fire on if, repre-J 22-year-old vessel was owned and operated by the Luverne Schweit, also of Trem- of the United Lines, whose cruise ship Noronic burned at her berth inlpealeau, who wss working with But politicans generally discount-ignited Kingdom and Canada Toronto last September 17, taking a'Dnigan and Ryder in repairing the Washington sentalives Naval repre- ed many of Bean's findings bas-jn6'd preliminary talks on stand-1 led primarily on past electionjardizing naval operations, and the! Hrends because they were made j to continue. I j without reference to political ef- '1'ne Department of Defense, an-' j facts of the Korean fighting. mouncing this today, said the talks! Besides Taft and Lucas, Bean j forecast the defeat of Democratic Senators McMahon and Benton of Connecticut, Myers of Pennsylva- jnia and McCarran of Nevada. He said Republicans had a 50-50 chance to beat Senator Taylor who apparently already has been beaten in the Democrat- are part of an over-ail plan "for collaboration in the broader mili- tary standardization program among all the armed forces" of the U. S., U. K. and Canada. 1 Admiral Forrest P. chief of naval operations, has giv-j en his okay for continuance of the! Rail Union Officials Fear Strike Near Donnell Colorado as likely to join Taft, in naval phase of the talks, the De- Bean listed Republican Senators ui "le onnell of Missouri and MiHikin of fense department said. By Norman Walker Washing-ton The White   Four crewmen were killed when a crip- pled B-29 bomber crashed in a field near here yesterday afternoon, then burst into flames only 200 feet The gaunt 41-year-old "it looks like he picked the heads from a cluster of small frame emerged and knelt the two policy committees so v.-..... before the shrine. A loudspeaker I that, ho wnnirt at the kneeling wall before after flle elections." shrine and in front of the multi-l There was some evidence jtude. At I Mrs. Van 11 a. m. Jo Ann, one ofiTaft's friends think Bean's :ore- i Hoof's seven children, Icast might be some help, since equipment and training as well as tactics and operations, including amphibious landings. By standardizing operations de- fense officials evidently feel ihe Allied nations will work better to- gether in any common defense ef- fort. The Defense department point- ed out that promotion of standard- ization of military one of the aims equipment is of the North jcrowned a statue of the Virgin with ;t co.uld to help dispel treaty military production roses. Several persons fainted. The crowd had multiplied from at midmorning, with more than a hundred chartered buses and several special trains arriv- ing. confidence in the ranks of the I and supply board. The department Ohioan's campaign workers. said further- Lucas told a reporter he thinks] Bean included him among those the economist predicted would be defeated "so he could sell his arti- houses. Eight crewmen escaped with minor injuries. i> j fu -Udspeakerlthat he would attract some atten- intoned the decades of the rosary, Lucas said Lu After a moment Mrs. Van Hoof covered her hands with her face The four-engined bomber, went directly into the house. Barksdale Air Force base, I Afterward she relayed the message "The arrangements made wi 11 reduce the operational and tech- nical obstacles to co-operation among the navies and will achieve the greatest possible economy In the use of combined resources and Shrevesport, La., a_pparently said attempting to land at Carswell Force base, two the crash scene. Democratic policy group and the Republican. ,cojntry ji Bean forecast the lican Co-operation efforts will not, [however, impair the control of any country "in any activity in its ter- the Defense department miles south ofj The visitors jammed every available highway leading into this The plane hit and began flaming little town of on the Yellow was given her by said Democratic'se'nators JMahon and Benton are likely to be Chiefs of two big unions repre- senting trainmen and con- ductors agreed "reluctantly" to go back for more peace talk John R. Steelman, assistant President Truman. the Quebec's decks watching the grandeur the Sa- guenay cliffs. The ship sailed from Montreal Sunday night for Bagot- ville, some 40 miles up the nay river, Lawrence. a tributary of the St. Red Tanks Pierce Line At Nakfong W. hood P. Kennedy of the Brother- of Railroad Trainmen and B. O. Hughes of the Order of Bail- way Conductors said they could see nothing accomplished at a four-hour meeting with Steelman last night. They said Steelman, however, was optimistic something The fire reportedly was: discov- ered in a hold. As the crew fought unsuccessfully to bring1 it under Icontrol, the ship's master, Captain! B? Kelman Morln 'C. H. Burch, made a 25-mile run] Tokyo Red troops with to bring his vessel into port here, j tanks burst out on the Naktong de- There was no panic among the !ine today below Changnyontr passengers. Although the vessel surged to points seven miles was equipped with a sprinkler sys-jealP of the river. tern and a fire-proof bulkhead, Uie segments of the could be worked out today. But, said Kennedy, "unless we make some progress, it looks like we will be at the end of our A spokesman for the railroads! ;old reporters, contrary to what Kennedy had said, that progress! .vas being made in the confer- ences with Steelman. The spokesman also predicted t h a meetings wili continue beyond day, despite union talk of a dead line. beaten. McMahon said he usually a betting man but he'd like to as it plowed crazily along the river through yesterday and with some cash >iis 'belief ground for almost half a mile. despite admonitions frorrjthat Bean doesn't know what he's i Three charred bodies were re-jthe Catholic hierarchy to members'talking- about so far as Connccti- Imoved from the nose section their faith to stay away. ;cut is concerned I the plane and one from the center I Tney came by automobile, bus! Leaders Disagree land special trains from all parLsi Donnell, whom Bean predicted field sald three "f thejof the country to crowd every be defeated by Thomas Henn- of the tal'm Democratic nominee Captain Bernard J. 'old Fred Van Hoof, husband of.'in Missouri, said he isn't too much Flying Farmers Plan National Meet The new federal rent law that'Joyce of Arlington, Mass.: First became effective July 1 provides Lieutenant Annand S Trepanie-- that federal rent control will observer, son of Mr. and Mrs R' December 31 except in Incorporated A. Trepanier of Holyoke Mass localities which take action before The name'of the fourth victim December 31 to continue. Was withheld until next of kin were The locality must declare that acetified shortage of rental housing exists! Injured we-e' which requires the continuance of] Captain Robert A. Dibbell, Allen- controls, jtown. Pa., commander-pilot: Cap- Governing bodies in the 18 local-i tain Richard W. Swanson, Cleve- ities took such action in July, Woods'land, Ohio, observer: First Lieuten- said the resolutions have been'ant Leroy L. Ehlenbeck. Milwau- found legally adequate. !kee, Wis.. observer. First Lieuten- The 18 places included Joseph Herbst, Jersey City. N. Evanston and Pekin, 111. jj.. observer: Second Lieutenant Robert E. Morey, Button. Mass co-pilot; Technical Sergeant James A. Barnes, Greenville. S. C., gun- ner: Staff Sergeant Edward M. jBerkheimer, Bronx, N. V., radio J operator, and Staff Sergeant Willmar, Minn. The L- Rees, North Pelham, N, Minnesota Flying Farmers will engineer. in the national defense set up was! Witnesses said something appear-, discussed at a state meeting of wrong- with the ship's landing organization here Sunday. !Sear and the craft apparently About 70 delegates attended ae r'lot was' group's fifth annual convention u also discussed plans for the annual! The plsne carried bombs- convention of the National Flying Farmers association at Bemidji September 4-7. Kenneth Butler of Hutchinson was elected president of the Minne- sota group. Other officers are Jesse Poole, Winnebago. re-elected vice- president; E. R. Mertesdorf, Vernon center, re-elected secretary-treas- urer; Ralph Selland, Madelia, elect- ed national delegate and director, and Roy Schaper. Amboy and Alvin Johnson, Hector, ejected state direc- tors. :inued on Page M, Column 6) perturbed by the forecast. But Don- nell said he realizes he has a bat- tle on his hands and wants to get WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS Kennedy spoke of possible wild' cat strikes, contending that the members of the two unions upset over this deal." He said _ 'the dispute has gone unsettled V-mona and vicinity: for' 17 and tne men ire anxious to strike. The unions are seeking a reduo iion from the present 48-hour week to a 40-hour week for workers in I yard service without loss in pay. nesctay with chance of local ;lum-j dershowers Wednesday evening. Low tonight 67, high Wednesday 88. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the presidential board recommend- hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 37; minimum, 66; noon, 87; precipitation, none; sun sets tonight at sun rises [home for active campaigning' as morrow at jfoon as possible. Additional weather on Page 15. Mrs. Talle Weaker At Albert Lea Albert Lea. Anna! Talle, 83, mother of Representative Henry O. Talle was re- ported "considerably weaker" today In Naeve hospital here. Mrs. Talle is also the mother of Irvin Talle. Albert Lea. a Minnesota! state representative. Congressman1 Talle is from Decorah. As Nuns At The Left Kneel at the shrine of the Virgin Mary at Necedah, Wis., this morning near the home of Mrs. Anna van Hoof, a group of curious visitors pray at the left. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) ed the shorter work week but not as much pay as the unions desired. Special Edition For Dollar Day Wednesday is Dollar day in Winona. And remind readers at the aales and savings offered ciur-. tag the twice-yearly city-wide event, The Republican-Herald is putting out two editions of the Dollar day section, Monday, the pag- sent out to the rjml areas neighboring com- munities. City readers get their special night. Included in the 14-page Dol- lar day section are bargains and extraordinary savings offered by Winona merchants. Brand new merchandise, mark-downs on regular stocks and clearance prices on some items are all advertised in the special sec- lion. In addition on the inside read about the program to be pre- sented at the Winona. county fair, Thursday through Sunday. What to do in case of atomic bomb attack is contained in the interesting: article on Page 2 of the Dollar day edition. Also enjoy a visit with an artist -who is making his way down the Mississippi by canoe and a host of other interesting and in- formative in to- day's edition of The Republi- can-Herald. S. 24th infantry division in bit- I ter fighting that piled up casual- ties on both sides. General MacArlhur's headquar- ters in Tokyo early today announc- ed his usual morning report would be omitted because there had been change in the South Korean sit- uation. The headquarters war sum- maries usually are hours behind field dispatches. 1 Allies Delay Attacks j The Allied resistance to the Com- _., 'munists had slowed the Red war Vatican boaiiy as-jtimetable. North Korean prisoners sumption into Heaven of the Virgin j said the schedule called for capture Mary, the mother of Jesus Christ, Taegu. South Korea's emergcn- on Tuesday, fifth an- of V-J day and of liberation from Japan. flames gutted the ship. M Bodily Assumption Of Virgin Mary To Be Proclaimed will be declared to be a dogma of the Catholic church November Corel's Vatican sources said yesterday. The Changnyong fighting was Pronouncement of the new dog- j bloody but indecisive, of the most important] Thirty miles northward along ine ceremonies of the 1950 holy river U. S. and Red Troops will be made by Pope Pius XII up- on the closing day of an Interna- tional Marian Congress to be held [where. were reported throwing everything at each other but not getting any- n Rome. A field dispatch said the Reds The Pontiff has called a secretisurged six or seven miles east of consistory for October 30, at which ithe Naktong on their deepest pen- final preparations for the promul-ltHration In the Changnyong sector, atlon of the new dogma will The Red gain was considered se- made. Irious but an American divisional Most Catholics for centuries havelstaff said: believed that the mother of "We are confident we can was borne bodily into Heaven. Ule Gooks back across the riv- Proclamation of this as a dogma'er but ]t may take llme-" i will compel all members of the I One Red battalion fought dcsper- I church to believe it or expose ihem-lately to link UP witn guerrillas be- seives to heresy. the Americans. A Russian-made Yak plane, on jibe first North Korean combat mission in days, dropped two 550 pountj bombs on Masan, southern port, and strafed the important, communications center to the rear of U. S. lines. Reds Regain Ground Frontline reports said the Reds at Changnyong, 23 miles southwest 2 Carleton Students Given Tito Medal Americans have received Marshall Tito's highest honor for shock workers award given for ef- forts above normal. The seven girls and three young men, most of them still in college, went to Yugoslavia under the aus- pices of the National Students As- Monday. Taegu is the South Republic's emergency capital and ojbective of Reds poised in the Waeg- wan sector, 12 miles northwest of Taegu. Red tanks and armored cars hit hard in the Waegwan area. They availed themselves of a Russian- sociation of America. submerged suspension bridge Joining volunteers from other to move a regiment, about 3.000 countries, the young Americans paid (men, and tanks over the river for then- transit to Yugoslavia. After (against South Korean defenders, three weeks on the University of [Such bridges are built just below Zagreb construction job, during ithe water's surface to hide them whfch they are maintained by the (from observer detection and are government, the American volun-1 capable of supporting armored teers tour Yugoslavia at government river-crossings. expense. Those receiving the eluded: award in- A U. S. Eighth Army commu- nique issued at p.m. Tuesday a.m., C.S.T.) said the So'jth counters b- river-crossers near Helen Morris, of Berwyn, Pa., and Koreans successfully Carleton college, Minn., and Ellen ae nver-cro! lErvin, ol Bala-Cynwyd, Pa., andj KOREA ICarJeton college, Mina. J (Continued on Pajre 3, Column 1-) i -i   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication