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Winona Republican Herald: Saturday, August 12, 1950 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - August 12, 1950, Winona, Minnesota                              Continued Cool Tonight and Sunday Baseball Tonight and Sunday Night KWNO-FM VOLUME 50, NO. 150 FIVE CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA, SATURDAY EVENING, AUGUST 12, 1950 TWELVE PAGES Warships In Fight to Hold Pohang Single Defense Minister For Western Europe Urged ri, r 3 Tax on G.I. s By Philip Clarke Strasbourg, Franco Winston Churchill, backed by the European consultative as- sembly, urged West Europe's governments yesterday to unite their armed force.'; for protec- tion against Russian aggres- sion. Britain's wartime prime minister declaret! such a force should be under the control of a single defense minister, but said he himself was not a can- didate for the'' position. The assembly adopted Churchill's motion to set up the unified force 89-5 with 27 ab- stentions, but its action will have no immediate practi- cal result's. The group is a completely unofficial parlia- ment with no power to create a European army or defense ministry. Churchill said his motion was intended as "warning and guidance" for the Western worid. As such it may serve to spur official government moves towards unified defense. To up the Army of United Europe. Churchill said, large armed forces' should be sent to the continent from Bri- tain and the United States. Although he did not mention German troops in his speech on the floor of the assembly Churchill said afterwards he would be delighted have them take part in the organiza- tion. He scoffed at reports that rearming Germany would pre- cipitate an immediate Russian attack: "Belive he declared, "the long calculated designs of the Soviet government will not be timed or deflected by events of this order." Churchill said that during the two years he estimated it would take to build up the Eu- ropean anny we are still under the shield of the atomic bomb, possessed in formidable quan- tities by the United States alone. In my opinion we have a breathing space." More U. S. Air Force, Army Reserves Called Major Items On President's Program Approved Mostly Enlisted Men, Officers In Lower Grades' Washington The Army! KQKEA and Air Force are calling up jjft i By Francis M. Lemay Res boosti I Washington -OT- Congress the numbe, wm g ;.peared agreed today that G.I.'s'mon for active duty "within jfighting in Korea shall pay no Uvo and one.halj months. ,eral income taxes, and that the of their officers shall be re-.tional future calls iduced. TODAY- Scientists Can Create Satellites Wage, Price Curbs, Rationing Controls To Be Given Truman Marvin L.Arrowsmith By Stewart Alsop The Air Force, hinting at addi- said last night it expects to put 8.000 officers and A special exemption for enlisted men into active jmen in areas of hostility will by fal, n spoke Qf into a new tax bill asked number as an "initial require-1 by President Truman to raise a year as the "first in-i The Armv Announced it is order-! jstallment" of the nation's raale reserve officers to1 jments on the Korean war duty bv October 6 Last jAmenca's rearming against Com-jweek. it for The decision on fighting men to report during Sep- jtaxes was made yesterday by and October. j Senate finance committee as The Air Force is summoning j unanimously approved an increase mostly officers of the of Cap-' i of about a year or below and enlisted men1 !taxes on personal incomes of special military skills. The taxpayers. JArmy wants captains and The committee now has approvedilieutenants plus medical, den- !the major items of the President's! tal and veterinary corps officers program. It has followed hisiup to majors and lieutenant col- Senate administration leaders said today proposals but the bill whenJonels port by Republican Senator Ives virtually clinches passage of a bill j completed may fall some millions' As an initial step toward adiust- Washington There is one fact 'giving President Truman authority to invoke wage-price controls of raising at theling the rank of officers already that makes an interesting com-iratiomng, when he sees fit. jpresent rate ol national income, ion active duty to those being re mentary on the times In which we! Democrats in charge of the measure said they figure the New, Senate OK Secn (called, the Air Force said live This is that a former Mis-jYorkers1 warm backing of the bill! souri farm boy will soon have already made clear will rally I to decide whether or not to create enough G.O.P. votes to assure a; a new heavenly both'. comfortable margin on the final j Like so many things these days.jballot expected next week. j this sounds like so much nonsense, j Administration leaders said they. Yet it Is quite soberly true. Re- believe Ives. already -has spikedi search on the creation of an arti- ficial satellite, which would circle the earth like a much nearer and a move by some of his Republican! colleagues to down the broad powers the bil. would confer much smaller moon, was startedjon Mr. Truman. by order of former Secretary The House on Thursday passed State James Forrestal. It has similar measure by a whopping some time been established that the imajQrity __ 333 to 12. project is entirely feasible. Whilej Few changes Seen "economy" ruled the day. there; was no chance of moving beyond j "I think we are going to get National Air Race Crash Kills Pilot Senators George (D.-Ga.) andiwill be considered for temporary Mlllikin (R.-Colo.) said they to the grades of cap- the measure to sail through the tain and first lieutenant. Senate. George is committee chair- man; MiHikin is the senior Repub- It also announced the grounds on which reserve officers and air- the research stage. Yet now that a great rearm- ament program is under way, a perfectly serious question has arisen as to whether or not to move ahead into the actual en- gineering phase. The expense, Initially at least, would not be very great. The best estimate is that it would cost no more than or about one per cent of current defense ex- penditures, to establish tlie first, experimental satellite In space What is staged in thr fueled. that the about the with the and the become the much smaller. this bill through the Senate with .only a few minor said (Senator Maybank floor Congress becomes tangled in an ar- gument over whether to impose an [excess profits tax on corporations. I Under provisions approved thus! Ifar by the finance committee, this! [is what the bill would do: 1. Start digging deeper into the (pockets of individual taxpayers on! Detroit Twelve i. withholdings on wages! spectators at the International -----'-1 jump then from the lican. The bill may reach called up may apply for de-! White House by September 1, unless lay. These include: 1, Persons enrolled in edu- cational institutions, 2. Those engaged in research and scientific activities, 3. Individuals in certain es- sential activities. 4, Hardship and dependency cases, Appeals to recall orders may be yesterday. Dark-haired 21-year-old James raore than nf Oak Part1 Hi was of ak Park' ni- was manager of the measure. Maybank predicted defeat for an amendment by Senator Taft (R.- jOhio) which would knock from the! bill a provision giving the Fresi-'pune dent e. free hand to decide whether of his and when while other midget planes controls should be imposed. JUUJU L11C11 HUIii UI1U Fair saw a handsome young pilotipresent 15 per cent to 18 per cent die when his midget plane crashed (The actual increase in taxes will [be around 20 per cent for perhaps the plus taxpayers, with lower percent- age increases in the higher brackets lifeless from the wreckagejthat now pay the stiffest taxes. The! 1. Newspaper tiny craft, the "Ace of Dia- new, higher rates will apply on onlyjtions were as Military units headed for the Far East will have priority in the as- signment of Army reserve officers called to duty. The Army expects to have its quotas for medical of- ficers filled by September 10. In other military developments: Open Arrows Show Where V. S. and South Korean forces struck at Communist invaders along the Korean front. U. S. forces (1) strengthened positions within two miles of Chinju. Along the Naktong river line (2) Allied units beat back two North Korean attempts to carve bridgeheads across the river north of Waegwan and near Tuksong. The Communist bridgehead southwest of Chang- nyong was compressed by strong U. S. attacks. Defenders counter- attacked in heavy fighting' at Pohang (3) where U. S. troops still hold the airfield and port facilities outside the town proper. Reds continued pressure above Uisong in the Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) raced on overhead. Taft's proposal is to iet Congress Both wi of the Iane 2_ Vosyka flew her at 200 one-fourth of 1950 apply individual come, but will be applicable to all income in 1951 and years there- and radio sta-1 asked by the Armed! in- Forces not to report alerts or after. movements of troops training in the United States on grounds that! U. S. Woman Held In Atomic Spy Case Battle Raging Along 140-Mile Battlefront .Red Forces Across Naktong River Being Contained By Russell Brines Tokyo Fierce combat flar- ed from end-to-end of the 140-mile Korean battlefront today. A grinding1 American offensive secured the left flank of the United Nations line but Allied forces fought hand-to-hand battles to save ;the flaming right anchor at Po- (hang and to protect the center, threatened by massing Red divi- 'sions. At Pohang. A lurmoil of fighting rolled around the burning port, second only to Pusan as a sea- I borne supply point, ind the airport ;six miles southeast. Tank-led I American and Sout'.i Korean troops unleashed sharp counterblows at North Korean Reds who slipped through inland valleys and rolled [into Pohang Friday. Allied forces clung tenaciously to the vital wa- terfront area and the airstrip. De- stroyers moved into the harbor, adding their firepower to the Al- lied guns. Along the Nakiong river line 50 miles to the west. Allied forces beat back two Red attempts to carve new bridgeheads on the west bank. The U. S. First cavalry di- Reds Surrender With U.S. 25th Division In North Korean lieutenants walked into Ameri- can lines today waving "safe conduct passes" and surrend- ered. American planes have sprin- kled the passes liberally over enemy lines. They are invita- tion to surrender. The two lieutenants were first North Koreans to use them. Heretofore few Red officers have been taken prisoner and none surrendered. The lieutenants were waving the Red-colored passes over their heads as they came toward positions of the Fifth regiment- al combat team. 'Republican policy committee, told; miles an hour in the third heat of I a year, raising the topi the Senate yesterday there is noithe Continental trophy race.irate from 38 per cent of income tol 'vision, at bayonets' point fought I off a Red attack southwest of Taegu, vital Allied communica- tions center. Northwest of the city, j South Koreans blunted a tank-led Red thrust. such information would aid the] New York The seventh American and second woman Farther south along the Naktong 2. Increase corporation taxes by'enemy. arrested by the government in the Klaus Fuchs atom spy ring line, a powerful American 2. The Maritime administration.lcharged yesterday with conspiracy to commit espionage. attack compressed the one remain- ordered withdrawal from the re-j She is Mrs. Ethel Greenglass Rosenberg, wife and sister of two important Communist bridge- already accused of the same on the east bank. This was She is a small, slight woman of i near Sinam, about six miles EOtith- J35, the mother of two children. iwest of Changnyong. The Army's j The government accuses her of: 24th division drove to the water's .helping her husband and on the north flank, while oth- Ipersuade her brother to turn over er elements pushed the Reds back 'A-bomb secrets to the Soviet spy; about one mile on the south. Near U. S. Army and 'ring. !waRe-o r i c e-rationing autnoruy.i luucu tu i-ciuru. [and reduce the taxes for officers (previously piamwu. uisucau, "ciinj nil VIU1I lne cnme with which she is Marine infantrymen anchored the i but he has said he would be gladi The heat was won by Keith Sor-jThe committee instructed its starfjsister ship Lake Champlain is tpj .charged had not occurred, perhaps, southern flank by_ winning heights .'to have it if Congress also gave'enson of La Crescenta Calif 'to draw up details of this plan. In be taken out of the "mothball'" This monstrous missile v, o ul discl.ction as to nf 1M us instance the committee modernized. out into space, each rocket Raining speed from the other, un- Ul the third and smallest rocket; and when to use t-he power. time ol 184.143 miles an The President also has said the S at about 17.000 miles'time for all-out an hour at a height of around s'Sht. miles above the surface of earth It would then become a true President "complete and arbitraryairport at defying the dictatorial power over the entire bevond hour was the slowest of the three 'posais of the president ne satellite. Representative Towe introduced a bill in the House call-j n'ot'neat winners, I" 4. Plug tax law loopholes. In for universal military training.j In the opening heat 46-year-old area, the committee has not 11. th lowed the President's recommenda-i-360 Minnesorans .ciuaeu wxmy mat, iijcs nave oeeuv "north nf explicitly. It rejected a by Call-up I0und jalwned in a boiier of the" A P laTcorrospondenl Ha! Approximate- aircraft carrier in position to risk reported that a "flaming no Taft said the bill would give the Steve Wittman, manager of :osh, Wis., set a rec-ipgp ord of 188.667 M.P.H. Bob Downey jiion ;of Whittier Calif., won the second i taxes from pull of the earth, provided it were economic life of the country." properly aimed. This matter of; Ives. R member of the Senate aiming is exceedingly committee which drafted at If the satellite failed to maintain] the bill minced no words in reply-' Bill Brennand, 23, Oshkosh an approximately constant height'jng to Taft, although he did not made a battle of the second heat; above the parth. it would the Qhioan by name. ail the way. the heavv frU-tion ii. tho lower at- mospiier we would not have had the present'six miles east of the Red-held city, situation in Chief MacArthur's headquarters !ant U. S. Attorney Miles J. the hard-hitting troops had told U. S. Commissioner their objective in the first W. McDonald in asking for S. offensive of the war. admiralty dis-ibail. i The big fight was around Pohang clowd tnriav that files r-avp hppn1 did not explain his remark, on the Sea of Japan, 65 air miles closed today that Hies been Carrier Boiler ids, designed to gethy 350 Minnesota men will be af- persons who fail w re- fected by the Army's callup of vol-l pd> mentsi sixth, o iru-uon .m .u- Ives saicj was not impressed The midget races will by corporations, to crowd an 2159 winch wKilil it to bj, pr0posai to let today and Sunday in spite] or more dollars officers. The the But triven tltf rislit altitude, the risrht speed and the right aim, the satellite would then circle the earth at about the rate of 16 complete circumlo- cutions every 24 hours, or once round the earth in about an hour and a half. Again, provid- ed the rocket were properly aimed, it would not maintain a constant course in relation to the earth, hut would cover all sections of the globe, as tlie earth turned more slowly hrlow it. into Fifth Army area includes North and on to rather than the the crash that killed Vosyka.! the treasury over the next five years.l'south Dakota, Wisconsin. Iowa, carrier. Once signal flares over the decision on timing of contrqls.'the air fair committee said. now have a full yean Illinois. Indiana. Michigan. Missouri, (found in the boiler room and Mrs. Rosenberg's brother. David lean's land" separated opposing- IGreenglass, a 28-year-old Brooklyn'forces within the town. American 'doughboys and tankmen who fought through attempted am- bushes ringed the airstrip and held 'ground to a key bridge about onc- inteUigence "has "been "called charged "that Rosenberg. 32, help- :and-a-half'miles south of Pohang. 
                            

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