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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: August 9, 1950 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - August 9, 1950, Winona, Minnesota                              Local Showers Late Tonight, Thursday Baseball Thursday p. m. KWNO-FM VOLUME 50, NO. U7 FIVE CENTS PER COPY W1NONA, MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 9, 1950 EIGHTEEN PAGES U.S. Attacks Upset Red Offensive TODAY- Tito Seen Next on Reds' List By Stewart Alsop Washington The minor Soviet satellite state of Bulgaria is about as strong in ground forces as the United States, according to the most recent and most reliable in- telligence estimates. This wholly ur.amusing commentary on the ex- tent of American disarmament suggests one reason why Yugo- slavia is now moving up towards first place, in the official specula- tion on where the Kremlin Is most likely to strike next. An attack on Yugoslavia by the satellite Bulgarian, Hungarian, and Rumanian armies has bejn considered on balance unlikely simply because it has been gener-j ally assumed that Marshal Tito's! tough troops could rather easily deal with such an attack. Since Korea set the pattern, however, the military experts have been hiving a good hard look at this complacent assumption. And what they have found Is anything but re- assuring1. The Bulgarian ground consist of Sen fully manned and fully equipped divisions, in- cluding one armored division, or almost exactly the day strength of the American iround forces. (It is true that satellite divisions are smaller, hut it is also true that the American divisions on Korea day has been reduced to abont 75 per cent of full The Hungarians and Rumani- an! have another 12 dlrisloni between them. Including anoth- er armored division, for a total of 23 divisions among- the three satellites. Again for purposes of compari- son, the entire ground strength available for the defense of West-l era Europe now consists! of twelve under-manned divisions (Including two Amerlcant or hardly more than half the ground forces of the three eastern European satellites. These satellite armies, moreover, are equipped with between 700 and 800 of the T-34 Russian tanks are now mauling the Amer- ican forces in Korea, plus a small- er number of good German World War n models. Malik Filibuster Blocks Work of Security Council Secret Service Seizes 2 Missouri Counterfeiters Washington The sec- ret service announced today the arrest of two men in a lonely mountain cabin at De Soto, Missouri, on charges of passing ID counterfeit ten dollar bills in 23 states. Secret Service Chief I'. E, Baughman said the men were scheduled for arraignment to- day before a U. S. commis- sioner in St. Louis. He named them as: Melvin Godfrey Parsons, of Crystal City, Missouri, charged with manufacturing the bills. Louis Elmer Shew, 41, of De Soto, charged with passing the bogus money on grocers and other store keepers throughout the west, southwest and south- east. Baughman said the men were arrested separately, yes- terday and last night, at a ca- bin where Shew has been liv- ing on the edfe of the Oiark mountains. He said complete printing equipment, including press and 40 plates were seized, together with 25 finished ten dollar counterfeit notes. The plates were hidden near the cabin, some buried in the ground, some in a wood pile. Others were stuck in tree tops. Baughman said the secret services knows more plates are buried in California in a ravine three miles from the ocean. He declined to tell re- porters the exact location Pie- cause secret service agents have not yet found tbe plates. U. N. Members Plan to Break Stranglehold By A, I. Goldberg j Lake Success MV- United Na-j tlons council members) mapped strategy today to break j Russian President Jakob A. Ma- Ilik's one-man stranglehold and fil- jibuster which has stopped the (council in its tracks. The Russians were not invited to the informal conferences which occupied most other delegations. The council recessed yesterday un- (tiK Thursday afternoon after get- ting nowhere in one of the most Navy to Build Atomic-Powered Submarine Carrier Johnson Stopped Work on To Be Finished By Joseph C. Goodwin Washington The Navy now has authority to build this coun- try's first atomic-powered subma- rine. Also, Representative Robeson' will be resumed soon on the ton supercarrier United States. And word came out of a special House Armed Services bitter, heated sessions since Ma- diting" subcommittee that lik took over the presidency Au gust 1. time work or extra shifts may be "expe-jL, over-: ji iii German Aid Asked In Western Defenses By Joseph Dynan Strasbourg-, Conservative Robert Boothby called today for Germany's participation in Western defense on equal terms with other nations. In the first major statement in the European consultative assembly from a member of his party, Boothby asserted that Western Europe s Taking the floor when he to this one seeking to condemn the U. S. Air Force for bombings in North Korea. He did this after making new charges that the U. S. rine was included in a Navy shipbuilding bill signed yes- terday by President Truman. Gains for Allies Reported on All Korean Sectors Most of Enemy Across Naktong Driven Back is the aggressor in Korea, dictat- The act also authorizes the build- chief retorted lssile vessel. A11 told the bill Who hasn't co-operated with for conslruction, moderniza- other UN members in the Or converslon Oj 112 vessels rean action? Who could call off the North Korea invaders? What member of this security council is assisting the invaders in the se- curity council? In each case, Austin answered himself "The Soviet Union." But Malik refused to allow Aus- of different types. Build up Sub Defenses The objective is to strengthen the Navy's anti-submarine striking By Russell Brines Tokyo Allied successes on all Korean war fronts were an- nounced tonight- by the U. S. Eighth Army. The North Korean invaders were (reported in retreat under Ameri- jcan onslaughts in the extreme I south and also being beaten back on the central front near Taegu, Some of the river-crossing Rcrts (on the Naktong water line in HIR (important Taepu area wore hurled (back across the river by South Koreans near Waegwan. U. S. 24th infantry division (troops battered at, a. stronger Rcrt (force in high ground cast- of the j river on the Allied side six (miles south of Changnyoner. That. town is 23 miles from ihe South (Korean republic's emergency cnpi- Open Arrows show areas where U. S. and South Korean forces Taegu. are hitting at North -Korean troops, dark arrows, on all Korean fronts. Reds are fleeing back to Chinju in the south to escape an American pincers movement CA'i. The U. S. 24th division continues heavy pressure on reinforced Communist units across the Naktong river southwest of Changyong Northwest of Taegu, U. S. and The Eighth Army headquarters (communique issued ai p.m. jsaid the U. S. 35th regimental coin- jbat team had put patrols (o wii.li- iin seven miles of burned-out Chin- power, and improve protection of harbors and coastline. Cobeuon did not elaborate on his statement that work Is to be re- defenses are "for all practical purposes still and that aW Jor be out_ action to _ meet the; t discus. tin's resolution of July 31, denounc- sumed st Newport News, Va., on ,__ ._ Koreaus and de-jthg united States. However, toe I jng "Either Germany is in our West- ern European union on equal _ _. ,_ -terms, or she remains out and oc- Copenhagen, Denmark Iff) sald Boothby. "We have Denmark's parliament was due make our choice and we have The three satellites also have adequate ground support air- craft, Yaks, Stormovlks, and other models generously sup- plied by their Russian mas- ters. The Bulgarians, for ex- ample. have n air force, with 200 front-1 i n e planes, Danish House To Vote Defense Funds, Dissolve ilawed, to come up for a discus- threat of totalitarian Communism. refused Reliable sources here previously had predicted that Conservative Party Leader Winston Churchill when he speaks to the assembly tomorrow, would propose the Ger- mans be armed to help in West- ern Europe's defense. Churchill's followers__________ __._ would make a speech of world (Korea but was voted down 9 importance tomorrow, j, with one abstention Yugo- Korean representative unless the council agreed to hear a North Korean. The meeting was still bogged down in a welter of procedure when it gave up until tomorrow. (Malik wanted it to meet today and said about the bombing of North to make it now." Full Aid Needed Boothby asserted that Germany is brought within t h is slavia. big ship for which Congress au- thorized has been erally cited In naval circles as ai potentially valuable arm for de- fense against possible submarine attacks on American shipping. Work on the carrier, still in the keel-laying stage, was halted more than a year ago on orders of Sec- retary of Defense Johnson. John- son said his order was made for reasons. Admiral Forrest Sherman, chief South Korean soldiers battered Red units which threw beachheads across the Naktong north and south of Waegwan. The broken line indicates the battle line. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) Wallace Quits Final Vote Progressives Near on Wage, [of naval operations and a strong After the meeting, of preparedness against dissolution today after defeat of a government austerity program, but the lawmakers planned to vote in new defense funds be- fore giving up their seats. (nations are not defensible. Following defeat of his proposed j ..Jf Germany comes in, then she Import controls in an all-night nave to roaice her full contri- ;tLr slon- Premier Hans Hedtoft handed jbution to our joint defense on the and the other satellites of his (.vor-urmo pin." Gross, a U. S. delegate, said a number of courses are possible to meet Malik's obstruction. The most extreme, he said, be to change the rules of unless tne electing a president and make them effective immedi- defense "framework, the throwing Malik "resignation and that of his diSlvinEparlHment dissolving parliament a decree the end o: I m HlO 1 CdJBlJCl HVJl v have comparable air strength. to King Frederick IX. On the other side. Marshal Tito can put into the field about thirty divisions. This number of divisions, larger than the total for the three neighboring satellites, explains the assumption that the satellites could same terms as everyone said Boothby. out of the chair. Extreme Move submarine warfare put in a plug for the supercarrier last April. He told the House armed services committee he believed ships of this York Henry Wallace resigned from the Progressive party last night because it condemns the American stand In Korea. j ._ The action completed a split that': Washington House Icaoers Price Curbs began three weeks ago between Wal- lace and the party that organized to run him for president in 1948. Three weeks ago. Wallace made public his own support for the U. S. and U. N. actions in the party's national committee is- sued a statement opposing the Am- erican action, Wallace said then he wc'-ild wait for action of the party's rank and1 hoped for a final vote today on a 1u, Red base in the deep south. j Most Optimistic Report The communique was ihe Eighth j Army's most cheerful up to now. It. reported that "agRressivc- .'minded United Nations troops ear- (ried out successful action in every i engagement with the enemy" 'along the entire 140-mile front. It said two of the Communist iforces across the Naktong, north land south of Waegwan, 15 miles (northwest of Taegu, had been driv- len across the river or to the wa- iter's edge. U. S. First cavalrymen drove the Reds back at the cross- ing south of Waegwan. Late frontline dispatches from {the Changnyong bridgehead said the bulge there had been reduced by U. S. troops who drove the Communists out of high ground. compromise bill that would givej the President standby wage and' price controls and power to im- pose rationing. These dispatches said thp Reds being herded in exposed po- sitions on a slope near the river. Lieutenant General Walton H. Worked oiuiale yesterday by the I Walker, Eighth Army House banking committee. after al week of debate in the House comman- Ider, had ordered the invaders at had produc T results, the com- this point wiped out by nightfall. The Allied central front is man- U. S. 24th division, re- committee. lows lines by hv Senate bank- inforced by newly arrived Second by ,he Senate bank {rom Lcwis> type would have to be built "in file before making a further move. type of the long run" to handle jet then, the Progressives' state! also cthe President ers and bombers being acquired (party organizations have voted I1: n'cnnlains The foremost Red threat rcach- (ho UuarurVialminirl-17 r. r-V lir, fhp lls-lCalCd 16 WOUJd ACLLpl. it lAJIlkaiuo j__-_ .-.ilnc TVlOfll Washington, the First cavalry and South Korean troops. by the Navy, Push Eadar Network Since the outbreak of fighting in Another extreme move he Korea, there has been increasing (overwhelmingly to back up the na- tional committee. Wallace said he had no immediate elaborate whetter ht Problems to a "jmeant a German army, or !lv German contingents in a New elections, said H e_d t o f t, force. stressed these are possible but not probable would be to have no more meetings this month. Another would be to transfer the ses- today's session. jsion of the general assembly. Sec- taik among congressmen that the United States should be complet- ed. The radar network projected to political plans. He gave his decision throw a protecting loop around In his earlier in a two-paragraph note to C. B. Baldwin, his long-time political aide and the Progressive party secre tary. no mandatory provisions and no ed to a dozen m les from Taegu. no nanaaioy v jrinK main supply terminal on the road- powers before (rail corridor leading: northwest, out he wants to. I0-' Pusan the bipc U'- S' base' Some of the details still are to: be worked out by the House com- jmittee at a LIU UW H pi U lUUp ai. UUtlU -HI HtJ tij if, i North America was discussed he did not condone the Marines Get Rolling u, tuc In the extreme south, where the meeting today, butjfirst U. S. offensive effort bopacd veste-dav's 21 to one vote presaged down two days ago, tank-led Ma- statement, Wallace H v rines and doughboys got to rolhnc .Kn ClcUI ajlllillt; ill Lt'C TI 1, would be held September 5. Mean- while the cabinet would continue in] Boothby said that Germany, too, retary-General Trygve Lie saidiAir Force experts called to of either Russia or the Monday such a session could con- closed-door meeting yesterday of (United States in Korea, bu vene in 24 hours if conditions war- not defeat Tito without direct in-loHiee as a caretaker government, tervention by the Red Army. But) The dissolution decree especially since Korea, it has be-up, however, until parliament i come obvious that Tito from grave advantages. she will choose to come with us." In this event, he said, "she will appropriate the previously-announc- counter-balancing dis be entitled to point out that she ed increase in funds for the armed The (is closest to the potential aggres One of these is suggested by the has a choice to make, and he ed: But Gross added the course to "My most fervent hope is that be taken to thwart Malik's obstruc- that one of the special House expediting (since it had come to fighting ne groups. I would stand with his country. Leaders o'f both political parties again but laboriously. T h e y had said earlier they would go drove past North Korean dead for along with an "acceptable" com-1gains measured in yards, pushing promise in order to break J House deadlock. Major provisions 3 ntl.'o ,-H 'miles' one way or the other] tion will be decided after cqnsulta tions that may last through tomor-1 row morning. By that time other! delegations can have instructions from their capitals. Gross said there has been no question of trying to expel Russia from the U. N. for not carrying out its obligations. But he said the council now plain, invitingly close to the sat-jpact. ellite frontiers. With Belgrade lost, Tn' jto submit to slavery, and that, if The three parties refused, is attacked, we will fight by Tito would be reduced to fightinKJever, to go along with the minority her side." (of imports previously permitted (entry. The government said the con- itrol: la Ex-Concentration Camp Chief Shot Antwerp, Belgium Philip an indecisive guerilla war in the government party last night when mountains. for controls on a number! Yet even graver is Tito's re- placement problem. Like the otlicr satellites Tito's army is equipped from pistols to tanks, with Russian arms, for which he can now get no re- plaeements. The loss of a cou- ple of spare- parts, after all, can immobilize a tank or ground a plane, and the nor- mal peacetime attrition rate has undoubtedly already re- duced Tito's ficMing strength. War immensely accel- erate this process, and while Tito was runnintr out of every- thing, from tanks to ammuni- tion, the satellites could draw on the inexhaustible Soviet" re- These are some of the reasons why reports that the satellite arm- ies" (especially the Bulgarian ar- my i are moving: up to the fron- tie'rs, are taken more seriously than ever before. Tito and his lieu-! tenants still assure Western ob- servers that they do not consider! M t Topic lost not perform his functions.1 If the U. N. can't do business in the se-( curity council, then it must do it in Ihe general assembly where (Russia doesn't have a veto, he ine government saia uie are inextricably involved in the: rols were needed to give desperate struggle for world favorable balance of trade. h f t fe lace he said, to aliow Malik to get instructions from Moscow so he can give a ruling and let the council go ahead with its business. I in human history. We are all in the sakj he h'ad same boat and that boa. Is th hold g I this moment in great peril." j B Sources close to Churchill con- firmed he will speak on Western European defense, but they would (Johann Schmitt. former German give no details. They said Britain's commander of the Brecndonck leader will write the fin- near Anwern draft of his speech tonight. todav. The 48-vear-old Nazi was -I the dernned to death last Allled 25. after being found guilty by Belgian court martial of being re-! sponsible for the deaths of 52 in- mates of the camp. German divisions, within occupation forces In WEATHER Denied Boy's Injury Schlabach Won't Seek Re-election La Crosse, Wis. State Senator Rudolph Schiabach, La Crosse, formally notified the elec-i itions division of the secretary of( (state's office yesterday that he was j declining to be a Republican candi- date for nomination for Congress from the third district. Five organizations filed stale- st. U. S. court jor plans to support groups FEDERAL FORECASTS 'appeals yesterday upheld a federaljor individuals. They included: ijury verdict denying S100.000 Taylor county Sanderson for U, S. ..._____ ___ Winona and vicinity: to a Minneapolis boy who committee: Eric Werner, an attack imminent. Yet such as-'cloudy tonight and Thursday leg under a train there March President. surances have an uncomfortably ;local showers late tonight or Thurs-! 1948. j withrow for Congress club; Olaf familiar sound, especially sincejday afternoon. Low tonight boy, Daniel Nolly, nine, wasljohnson, Westby, president. theitoward burned-out Chinju, a dozen (miles ahead. bill On the central front ou side lalreadv approved or likely to beiTaegu, two American units ai. acK- i approved today by the House group I ed the Reds at their river bndge- Iwould give the President power to: heads. 1 Put ceilings on prices and] The American 24th division, rein- wages, with the May 24-June by fresh elements uf HIR '1950 levels as a yardstick, but not: Second division, stalled be tore a mandatory one for prices. troops holding Inch ever no wage could be pegged appoints six miles southwest OL a lowe" figure than was paid The town is 26 miles ing that period. southwest of Taegu 2 Ration and allocate materials: Twenty miles northward a first and facilities and require contrac-jcavalry battalion drove against an- tors to give top priority to Red force that, crossed Jie (things needed for defense. Naktong near Kaepon. I 3 Seize and operate privately Allied South Korean forces re- !owned plants and material if that-ported Wednesday night they had !is necessary to speed tip produc-ljust about cleaned out a (The President already bridgehead across the Nak- requisition power over five miles north of (facilities under the draft law.) ;15 miles from Taegu. I 4. Curb consumer credit and: The report was received by 'lighten up on real estate financing, i American officiate the Korean 5. Speed up production through (military advisory group in Korea, government loans and guarantees! The South Koreans sajd they up to a maximum of drove the Communists back across The bill contains a specific ban the river in a counterattack. About against putting ceilings on rents, boo North Koreans were strafed although a minority of House mem- j PaRC column 3.) bers are fighting to give the KOREA dent new rent control powers. (Potato Marketing Restrictions Asked Marines Seek iCombat Officers Washington The ture department yesterday urged: grower approval of a federal keting program designed to helpj stabilize prices of potatoes grown Minneapolis, Minn. The Ma- in Wyoming and western corps Recruiting office here, ka. jhas stated that the Marine corps Tbe program would provide initially call Volunteer Marine Korea, And Tito himself has taken high Thursday 84. the" precaution of cancelling leaves! and discharges. LOCAL WEATHEK 'injured while playing in the 29th: Citizens' committee on Van Pelt (street yards of the Chicago, Congress; Lewis Magnusen, Official observations for the st. Paul Pacific railroad, Oshkosh, President. Third congressional district In such circumstances, the logic hours ending at 12 m. today: inear' Clinton avenue. of his situation will sooner or later Maximum, SO: minimum. 65; I fOT boy's family ar- club- Wayne Hood, La Crosse, chair- force Tito to ask for armed aid noon, 84: precipitation, .15: sun setsj a th t such a from the West, simply because he (tonight at sun rises tomorrow to youngsters and thatl Citizen's Dieterich for attorney (Continued on Pafrc 15, Column 5) at 5'05- (railroads should thus protect themjgeneral club; W. H. Markham, Hori- ALSOP Additional weather on page 15. [by erection of high fences. limitations on shipments of pota- jtoes from these areas by grade, (size or quality. I Such regulations would be de- signed to keep small and low grade Icon, President. British Conservative Party Leader Winston Churchill, above, boards a plane at Kent, England, bound for Strasbourg, France, to attend sessions of the Council of Europe. He will address the group tomorrow, and predictions have been made that the British war- time prime minister will propose that the Germans be armed to help in Western Europe's defense. Churchill's followers said he will make a speech of world importance. (A.P. Wirephoto 10 The Re- I Corps Reservists in certain select- ed specialities and ranks. A limited number of officers above the rank of captain will be required. Generally, the Marine potatoes off the market. (corps will require all officers of The program will be rank of captain or below with to a grower referendum at dates (combat-type specialities. Non-com- to be announced later. Approval missioned officers of the rank of by at least two thirds those vot- master sergeant, technical ser- ing is required before the pro-jgeant, and staff sergeant will initial- gram can be put into effect. be needed only in certain spe- Rejection of the program while enlisted men of thft (make growers in these areas in-jrank of sergeant and below will (eligible for government price sup- j be immediately required in all 'ports on this year's crop. Ifields.   

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