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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: July 19, 1950 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - July 19, 1950, Winona, Minnesota                              Rain Ending Tonight, Warmer Thursday Baseball Thursday p. m. KWNO-FM VOLUME 50, NO. 129 FIVE CENTS PER COPY WINONA, MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, JULY 19, 1950 EIGHTEEN PAGES TEN BILLIONS ASKED FOR WAR U. S. Has Curfe On Food Prices By Ovid A. Martin Washington The government' has power to prevent runaway prices for many food and farm products. It does not need .special price control authority to place curbs on markets for such commodities as wheat, corn, cotton, dry beans and peas, flaxseed. linseed oil, cottonseed oil, cheese, dried eggs and milk. I It acted late yesterday to stabilize rising prices of cotton by announc- ing bales stored under price support programs will be kept available for market sales. Appar- ently anticipating the announce- ment, the cotton market broke sharply during the day. Power to set up what amounts to price ceilings exists in provisions Of furrn law relating to government TODAY- Johnson Ivocates Rearmi ing 2 More Divisions rorce Safely Ashore n A j Authorized Without Serious Enemy Action Reds Renew Artillery Attack On Taejon authority for disposing of farm sur-1 Red artillery shells! By Joseph and Stewart Alsop Washington to cur- rent report, Secretary of Defense Louis A. Johnson, of all people, is now getting ready to step forward as the great advocate of a power-! ful American defense effort. It Is! long past time for this quic change, since any reader of the newspapers can now see the direct results of Secretary Johnson's pre- vious appearances in the role of the great economizer. pluses acquired under price support programs. By offering these products at set prices, the government could pretty well fix the top limit of prices, at least as long as its supplies lasted. screamed into Taejon today in resumption of the western battle as thousands of fresh U. S. infantry- men plunged into the Korean war on other fronts. Both Taejon, formerly a city of Perhaps the most poignant corn- Few if any buyers would pay more and a contiguous village, than the government selling price.! were under North Korean Cornmun- Price Hikes Probed jist artillery fire. Elements of the In the case of nonperishable and U. S. 24th division, which fought the Reds to a standstill at the Kum river, were still holding the city. The fresh U. S. divisions rushed to the Korean war front are the commodities, the govern- ment may sell at prices equal to five per cent above the current price support rate, plus reasonable carry- ing charges. In the case of perishable pro- as butter, cheese, dried ment on onomies" Johnson's defense was contained in a ar.d milk the government re- may sell at any pnce it sees lit, cent report from the Korean front. A shattered American unit, just from the battlellne. was resting on a rocky hillside. Their exhausted officer spoke for them all, in two brief, bitter sentences. "You don'i fight two tank- equipped divisions with .30 cal- iber carbines. I never saw such useless damn war in all my life." The young soldier had good rea- son to be bitter as the story ofj the American armored force will show. There has never been the slightest secret about Soviet arm- ored strength. Russian World War n tanks were consistently better than ours. The huge Russian arm- ored force of over tanks was retained on combat status when peace came. And as long as three years ago, Russian output of new tanks was known to have reached when there is danger of these pro- ducts deteriorating. Recent price increases, since the outbreak of the Korean fighting, have brought about an investigation by a Senate banking subcommittee headed by Senator Maybank (D.- S.C.) The Inquiry is to start tomorrow. Maybank said, with special refer- ence to eggs and meat, that "We. are going to call In some of these who have been putting up their prices and see why they have done it." There also have been con- gressional complaints about bread price rises. Despite recent price advances In some foods at the retail level, most Telling 'Em Apart A U. S, beachhead in Korea (by courier to July 18 (delayed) As American troops prepared for an amphi- bious assault landing on the east coast of Korea, they talk- ed over the chances of hand- to-hand fighting. A lanky Texan, his face wrinkled with concern, asked his buddy: "How we gonna tell a South Korean Irom North Ko- The answer: "Easy, brother. U he's a South Korean he'll walk up to you and say 'Hello, you all.' If he's a North Korean he'll shoot you daid from a tank." First U. S. Cavalry Division Troops splash ashore today at Pohang on the east coast of South Korea in the first combat amphibious operation since World War n. The force was unopposed and moved inland quickly against no opposition. (A.P. Wirephoto via radio from Tokyo to The Re- publican-Herald.) a year, many of them the great 60-ton heavies. When James V. Forrestal launched his American rearma- ment program, a vigorous attack on the tank problem was conspicu- ously included. Even after Presi- dent Truman sharply cut back the Forrestal program, in November, 1948, appropriations and authoriza- tions were still provided to give this country a respectable armor- ed force. When Johnson took of- fice, the order had already been stop. During commodities owned by the govern- pirst dismounted, and the ment are still selling for less than ThPv WH-P minimum levels at which Uncle Sam could sell them. Wheat, for example, is selling at close to the price support level, which is 90 per cent of parity, or a farm average of about a bushel. Parity is a standard for measuring farm product prices. It is declared by law to be equally fair to farmers and those who buy their products. Attack on Greece Feared in Making 25th (Tropic They were whipped into the Korean theater on ten days notice. The First cavalry landed unop- posed at Pohang, on the east coast.] It was the first U. S. amphibious landing of the war. Pohang is a little port 66 miles north of Pusan, important U. S. supply base on the southeast coast. The new U. S. troops will lift] some of the fighting burden-fromj Washington A site for a Lake Success A United Nations committee warned today that the Russian-led Cominform may be planning an attack on Greece, Secretary-General Trygve Lie advised member nations that the U. N. Balkan committee, with events in Korea as an example, had re- ported Communist propaganda attacks on the non-Communist Greek government might well be a cover- Site Being Picked for H-Bomb Plant Long Inactive Viruses May Cause Cancer BULLETIN Washington The Defense department announced today tbc Army and Air Force will befin immediately recalling a limited number of reservists to active duly. The Navy also will start immediately a "selective recall'' of reserves, the announcement said. There was no immediate indication of how may men would ordered to duty. Washington President Truman asked Congress today to vole all the men and armed strength needed to turn back the Communist armies in Korea and to block armed aggression elsewhere in the world. He put the starting cost of building up the military power of the ----------------------------------------------United States and the free world at He said a sharp tax increase, to- gether with other economic con- trols, is necessary to curb infla- tion and help foot the military bills. The tax recommendations will come later. For the present, Mr. Truman asked power to curb time-payment buying, establish priorities, allo- Icate materials, control inventories (and requisition needed supplies and materials. He reserved for the future such (more drastic measures as price control and rationing and called I upon all Americans to avoid them jthrough voluntary restraint. And the future? Mr. Truman coupled emphasis, on United Na- tions action in Korea with a warn- By Alton t. Biakeslee colds andj up for invasion plans. jchickenpox may plant the seeds for) The committee report contrasted I Maturity's cancer, a foremost ex- _t________. oert on viruses rf with public displays of unconcern by officials Yugoslavia, of both Greece and both non-Cominform countries, toward reports of unus- ual movements of Communist ;roops in Southeast Europe. The Balkan committee, in warn- pert on viruses reported today. Dr. Francisco Duran-Reynals of Yale told the Fifth International Cancer Research congress that the viruses causing such mild diseases may lie dormant in the body for years. Then, he said, something The government's minimum sell- he Ameri an the hydrogen bomb S price for wheat would be to Wdrogen norno ing price for wheat would be fivej24Ul and South Korean troops given for the first 1949, hundreds of tanks were to be equipped wi' armor and-more powerful per cent above the support ten charges in- volved in government storage and handling, which would be around 12 cents. Added together, this would being selected by the Atomic days on the rice paddy fields of western Korea. Elements of the 24th stood today between North Korean invaders, crossing the Kum river, J-ILUllJfc lilVttUGla, Lite U.UUJI A J our medium price of about Taejon_ and recently abandon- ed emergency capital of the south. The First cavalry, actually now an infantry unit, went ashore with Ctainly, the government, with that they would aree stocks of gralns, is in a _ ___________ least be fit to meet Russian tanks now engineering units and mounds of supplies. The troopers roared inland seven of equal weight. Almost at once, however, Johnson Ms "crash" savings program, to climbing to postwar peaks of S3.50, and corn from (the level. advancing above The government would jump at cut SI from the Ith6 chance of selling present large landed was a military secret. nnnnnnnnn nmlnvc an- istOCKS of butter anQ-Cheese at CW-I rjonpviil MacArHliir's f-nm miles or more without meeting the it said: Energy commission, a House-Sen- ate atomic subcommittee an- nounced today. The subcommittee said the site may take in as much as acres, but that it is not planned to build a new government owned community in connection with the production facilities. The statement did not specifical- mer.tion the hydrogen bomb but based its fears on recent charges by Nicholas Zachariades, Greek rebel leader. Zachariades, in the June 13 is- sue of the Cominform Journal, said the United States and Britain were, blaze up into an entirely new andj different He said the same effect may come from influenza, polio and other viruses. Just plain- aging, and changes of body tissue as you grow old, might! ___ fomenting an attack by lets the sleeping Greek armed forces on Communist Bulgaria and Albania. Committee members denied that the Greek army was being built' up. They said: "Since current history shows' that aggression is frequently pre- I ceded by propaganda accusing the defense outlays ap- proved fey President Truman and voted by Congress. Tank modernization was one of the first items to be crashed." being transformed into a John- sonian "economy" as early as March, 1949. That Is why we now have no tanks literally, none at all that can defeat the Russian armor in the field. What is more, this tank story which help many puzzled people to understand the course of the Ko- rea fighting, is fairly representa- tive of the way Johnson has ful- filled his promise to "increase the over-nil combat capabilities of the armed forces." In the case of the ground forces for instance, the 1949 planned strength was 12 divisions, six for occupation duty and six for a strategic reserve. In .1949 the Ma- rine Corps, so important in situa- tions like that in Koren, was or- ganized on the basis of II com- oat-reariy battalions. Under the Johnson crash program, however, two ground force' divisions, the Eighth, which was being organized, and the Sixth, which was in being and stationed in Korea, were Immediately sacrificed. Several other Army divisions lost their essential cuts, by be- injr deprived of infantry bat- talions, or of their artillery or armored componcms, or in oth- er ways. And the number of Marine battalions was reduced from eleven to six. Under pres- sure, Johnson restored two of these battalions, loudly bailing this backdown as one of his "increases in combat capabil- ity." In the case of the Navy, John- son's, "over-all increase in combat capability" consisted in cutting the fleet at iea from eight heavy car- riers to six: from 18 cruisers to 13; from 155 destroyers to 140; and so on. When the carrier cut (Continued on Page 5, Column 3) ALSOPS jrcnt prices. The situation is different A T. 't '111 UJ' pi. UJJCVfe liiiMf Communists, The number of menj "Of course, on the W4lli intended victim of aggressive in- tention, the special committee can- not disregard the possibility that such statements might constitute be constructed new facilities de- ________ _____________ ___________ signed to carry out the President's que announcing the arrival of the directive of January 31, 1950." divisions in Korea said ele-! It was on that date that Presi- General MacArthur's communi- regard to meats and sugar, 0{ one "have already Truman announced that he 'foods which have gone up consid- erably during the past two weeks. It owns none of these foods. Nei- ther does it own any coffee or wool, other items which have jumped in (price. Large stocks of wool bought combat" and that the other would had told the atomic commission be "committed to action In the very near future." In the Taejon area, the battered defense lines of the 24th division to go ahead with the H-bomb. virus change and start a cancer, Dr. Duran-Reynals said. But hor- mone upsets, X-rays, irritating chemicals, or many other things might cause the change, he added, of the world's foremost ex-1 perts on viruses, Dr. Duran-Rey- High Points Of Message Washington President Truman's call upon Congress today for expanded military and partial civilian mobiliza- tion means, if Congress ap- proves in full: For Families 1. Tightened install- ment credit, probably higher down payments and less time to pay. 2. Sooner or Inter, higher taxes. 3. No price, wage or ration controls now, but later If soar. 4. Perhaps fewer things to buy, especially autos and tele- vision sets. For Men of Military Age 1. A draft summons for those over 19 and under 28 as needed. 2.. A mandatory call to ac- tive service for national jruardsmen and reservists if their units or individual as- signments are wanted by the military. For Business 1. Controls over materials, mcludmf government authority to ration supplies and set up priorities to say who should get them. 2. Possibly limited output of civilian goods which take bijf quantities of steel and other scarce materials. 3. Curbs on inventory hoard- ing. 4. The possibility that need- ed materials will be requisi- tioned. 5. Higher down payment margins in commodity trading. S, The clearly-implied possi- bility of an excess profits tax, to produce revenues and curb profiteering. On KWNO Tonight The radio to the nation tonight will be locally over KWNO-AM and FM, beginnlnr at p. m. Wlnona time. nals developed his theory through experiments on very young chick- ens. Painting them with the powerful cancer-causing chemical methy- aggressive actions, The committee reported from advance! cholanthrene, he produced tiny yel- jlowish sores that proved to be fowlj, 'pox, a disease caused by a, virus I during the been sold. war s of wool bought teria" in its selection will be to have long since! (Continued on Page 10, Column a sUe fflat will "minimize its KOREA XU aliCAU. NO hint was given as to the site Geneva, Switzerland, where it is of the plant, except to say thatjpreparing its annual report for the "one of the most important crMU. N. general assembly. U. N. in its selection will be to I spokesman said committee ob- servers are still in the field and vulnerability to enemy attack." its headquarters are still in Ath- ens. similar to the virus of chickenpox or smallpox in humans. Extracts of these yellowing bumps, injected Into other chickens, gave them fowl pox. France Pushes Plan to Build Up Armed Strength Paris The ing against further aggression, clearly aimed at Marshal Stalin in Moscow. His words: "The free world has made it clear, through the United Nations, that lawless aggres- sion will be met with force. This is the significance of Ko- rea and it Ig a significance whose importance ennnot be over-estimated. "I shall not attempt lo prt- dict the courts of events. But I am sure that those who have it in their power to unleash or withhold acts of urmed ag- gression must realize that new recourse to afgrefsion in the world today might well strain to the breaking point the fabric ot world peace." Mr. Truman asked that all legal limits on the size of the armed forces be lifted to permit Increas- ing them "substantially." The President also reported to Congress he has empowered Sec- jretary of Defense Johnson to call Ito active duty "as many National (Guard units and as many units and individuals of the Reserve forces of the Army, Navy, and Air Forces as may be required." The armed services now are lim- ited by law to men. That figure is divided this way: Army Navy and Air Force Mr. Truman laid down his pro- French gov-'gram in a message to ernment is using the Korean warlthe Senate and House reporting in as a lever to build up armed strength. Spurred by the newest Commu- Francs'sidetail on what has happened in Korea and why the United States The painted chickens got worse nist aggression in Asia, the new skin trouble as they grew older. In- cabinet has jjected with the male sex Rumors have been rife that testosterone, many ot them de- garia and Hungary have massed troops on their frontier with Yug- oslavia. Tito and his chief lieuten- ants have exhibited no unusual public concern, though events in Korea have roused unusual specu- lation among the Yugoslav public expressed its deter- mination to arm France as fast and furiously as possible. Rene Pleven, the new was an active proponent of re- armament when he served as de- fense minister in Georges Bidault's cabinet earlier this year. Since he .become premier and the Korean caused the cancers in the started, he has redoubled his veloped cancers within 15 days. Ex- tracts from the cancers caused fowl pox but not cancer in other, chickens. The poxi virus, Dr. Duran-Rey- nals concluded, almost concerning the reported t r o o p; chickens. The chemicals had turn-1 efforts. movements close to home. I (Pentagon Signs JStress Secrecy Washington The Pentagon Great Clouds of Gray And Black smoke float up from Seoul marshalling yards after B-29 Super- forts strike in a major raid. Center of the hits appears to be at the left, where trains are visible. This photo was .taken by an RF-80 jet reconnaissance plane shortly after the strike. (A.P, Wire- photo to The Iwas placarded today with red-and- black lettered warnings against talking about war secrets where you shouldn't. They said: "Discussion of classified mater- ial in reception rooms aad public places is dangerous." WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and vicinity: Rain today, ending at sunset; clearing by mid- night: fair and a little wanner Thursday; low tonight 58, high Thursday 78. LOCAL WEATHEB Official observations for the hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 80; minimum, 59; noon, ed the chickens' skin into the right! Korea and rearmament were re- kind of garden soil for the virus seeds to become altered and to in- again is fighting thousands of miles from home. "The attack upon the repub- lic of Mr. Truman said, "makes it plain beyond all doubt that the international Communist movement is pre- pared to use armed invasion to conquer independent nations. We must therefore recognize the possibility that ait- grcssion may place in other areas." The President said the in- ported set for major discussion atjcreases ja the size of the armed today's regular cabinet meeting. In- duce cancer. When he stopped formed sources say the cabinet may painting the chickens' cancer disappeared. skin, theiconsider a bill to keep half the services and the extra supplies they need will require additional appropriations. Hence in..the next few days he will "transmit to the Congress specific requests for ap- propriations in the amount of ap- proximately At home, Mr. Truman said, there must be "substantial redirection of cer viruses, perhaps, can change French appeals lor more U, S.iecODOmjc resources" to insure that Viruses can cause some kinds of chickens, one he current class of conscripts in uni- ___ form. This would give extra train- infectious ing to soldiers and sail- continued, !ors. and viruses can change or mutate! The increased emphasis on de- under various conditions. If can-jfense is expected to produce new into milder forms, why cannot ordi- nary viruses change into cancer- causing agents? Dr. Duran-Reynals asked. Atom Spy Suspect [Faces Early Trial New York Quick grand jury action and an early trial were forecast today for Julius Rosen- latest of four Americans ar- rested in connection with Soviet ring headed by Scientist money and arms, probably at the conference in London next week of Atlantic pact deputies. At that conference Prance also may seek machinery for the manu- facture of artillery which the fight- ing in Korea has showed is naeded to stop tanks. French appeals prob- jably would be based, on the coun- j try's longtime superiority in artil- 'lery production as well as her close geographic proximity to Russia's night at sun rises tomorrow ati Additional weather on Page 14. ipects early action on Rosenberg's case by the federal grand jury. defense needs will be met with- out bringing on inflation and its resulting hardship for every fam- ily. Priorities Requested Accordingly, the President pro- posed: 1. That Congress pass legisla- tion now authorizing priorities and allocations for materials needed for national security, to limit use of materials for non-essential pur- home concentrations of tanks. to prevent O0arding, and to Jules Moch, the Socialist serving jrequLsltion or selze materials re- as defense minister in Pleven si cabinet, has surprised most obser- vers by supporting the drive for more armament. The Socialist pre- viously have demanded butter be- fore guns and have criticized gov- the rebels in Indo-China. But Rosenberg is charged with conspi-jnow is pushing as hard as Pleven racy to commit espionage. 'for stepped.-up arming. for defense. 2. That all government agencies review their programs with an eye to lessening the demand for serv- ices and supplies vital to defense. 3. That taxes be boosted more (Continued on Page 13, Column 3) TRUMAN   

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