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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - June 17, 1950, Winona, Minnesota                              SATURDAY, JUNE 17, 1950 THE WINONA REPUBLICAN--HFRALD' W1NONA, MINNESOTA toga 1 This Air Force C-46 transport plane "The Wi- nona" will be open to the public for inspection at the Winona municipal airport Sunday afternoon. It is due to land here at 2 p. m. from the Air Force Reserve training center at Wold-Chamberlain field, Minneapolis, for a joint instruction of Air Force and Army units demonstrating the co- ordination and transportation of Infantry units by Air Force troop carrier groups. The instruc- tion period, involving between 75 and 100 men, is to begin at p. m. Tomorrow is Father's day, and the much-abused man around the house will come in for his once-a-year honors as king for a day. Rover can have his doghouse back tomorrow, while Pop slides into the limelight. As has become customary, many fathers will receive a tie or a pair of socks or a handker- chief. If the children are espe- cially plush, maybe even a of course. Some churches will make special mention of Father's day at services Sunday. One confectionery has advertised free sundaes for fathers. Some dads undoubtedly will Winonans Attend Community Chest Clinic Sessions Three from Winona attended the Community Chest clinic of the Minnesota Research Council, Inc., at Minneapolis Friday. The meet- ing were held at the Citizens Aid building and the conference was addressed by Dr. Ralph Blanchard, executive director of the Communi- ty Chests and Councils, Inc. Attending from Winona were Steve Sadowski, president of the Winona Community Chest; Leroy Backus, chairman of the 1950 cam- paign here, and Arthur A. Gallien, Winona Chest publicity chairman. Mrs. Ward Lucas of Winona Is secretary of the Research council and K. A. McQueen Is a member of the board of dire6tors. The June meeting of the Winona Community Chest board of directors will be held at the Y.W.C.A. at p. m. Moiiday. An executive committee meeting will be held at the Y.W. at p. m. Bankers Attend Meeting at Gale Galesvllle, resentatives of all eleven banks of the Trempealeau-Jackson Bankers association were present here Thursday evening at a meeting at the city hall. Harold E. Wike, Mel rose, as president of the associa- tion was In general charge, the discussions dealing with service charges a'nd Interest rates. Hilman Olson, Black River Falls, Is secre- tary of the association, which laid plans' to hold regular quarterly ses- sions. Officers will choose a place for the September meeting. Present were President W 1 k e Melrose; Philip B. Mills and Hil- man Olson, Black River Falls; Os- car B. Slettleland, Pigeon Falls; T. S. Hulberg and S. T. Thomp- son, Osseo; James Robinson and Arild Engelein, Trempealeau; G, W. Swope and Ervlne Erickson, Arcadia: Walter Sprecher and Ot- to Sprecher, Independence; E. J Kuhn, Whitehall; J. A. Kamprud and A. C. Hagestad, Ettrick; Thomas Mattison and Victor A Thompson. Blair; J. F. Cance, Leonard Larson, R. H. Ashley and R. E. Mossberg, Galesville. Young People To Attend Rally A group of about 12 young people of the Evangelical-Presbyterian church will attend the district rally at South Ridge Evangelical church Sunday evening. The program will begin with a 6 p. m. supper. The 1407 West Fourth street. 'Much-Abused' Dad to Reign Tomorrow for One Brief Day take the day in is pacing the corridor of the Wi- nona General they will become parents. for babies are born, even on such a symbolic holiday. Other dads presumably will be permitted to celebrate by sleeping in a few minutes long- er than usual before the young ones begin raising the roof. It'll be nice, too, if some fath- ers are permitted to get out and fish or golf or enjoy a ball game. Usually for such privileges, though, fathers end up by hav- ing to take'the family out to dinner. But just the same, not many dads would trade places with non-dads. Police to Prevent School Vandalism Chief of Police A. J. Bingold stated this morning that police aave begun a campaign to elim- inate damage to playground equip- ment on public school grounds. The chief explained that during .he past week groups of teen-agers :ound loitering on the school grounds at night have been dis- persed and several taken to police headquarters for questioning. Several Instances of vandalism ,o playground equipment prompt- Minneapolis and in 1920 helped ed the current campaign, the chief stated. He added that the grounds will continue to be patrolled to insure the elimination of any further equipment damage. OBITUARIES Death of Dr. John P. Schneider Dr. John Peter Schneider, prom- inent Minneapolis physician, for- merly of this area, died at his home, 4148 Garfleld avenue south Minneapolis, Thursday, following a ong illness. He was born at Lewis- ton, Minn., April 21, 1879, and was educated at the Winona State Teachers college and the University of Minnesota where he received the MD degree in 1906. Following in- ;ernship at the Minneapolis Gen- eral hospital he practiced at Green Isle, Minn., for seven years. After a year's specialized training in Eu- rope he established a practice in License Deadline Monday Evening All applications for beer, liquor and mechanical amusement device licenses must be presented before p.m. Monday, City Recorder Roy G. Wlldgrube reminded today. Current licenses expire July 1, and Monday night's city council Winonan Helps Design New Electric Clutch A former Winonan, now an en- gineer in the research department of the General Electric Company, Schenectady, N. Y., has been suc- cessful in work to improve on a magnetic-fluid clutch, originally devised by the National Bureau of Standards. He is Kenneth E. Wakefield, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Wakefield, 224 West Sanborn street, and son- in-law of Mrs, F. M. Davis, Minne- sota City road. Mr. Wakefield is a graduate of Wiuona Senior High school, St. Mary's college and Pur- due university, Lafayette, Ind., and served almost four years in the Army. He worked with Mason Kronick, also a General Electric engineer, on the clutch, which, though only six inches long and six inches in diameter, is able to carry enough wwer to lift a ton feet a minute. Two metal cylinders, each able to rotate independently on the same axis, are separated by a magnetic mixture of oil and finely divided ron powder. When the unit is ener- gized, the fluid instantly solidifies so that the two cylinders are held lightly together. As one revolves, ,ts motion is transmitted to the other. The clutch is still in the experimental stage. Republican-Herald photo Motorist Fined for Speeding A Winona man arrested here Wednesday on a speeding charge was fined in municipal court this morning. Charged with driving 43 miles an hour on Huff street from Sanborn street south to Sarnia street, Al- bert W. Kaehler, 470 Minnesota To Boys State: Jack Wieczorek, Vernon Awes and Charles Meyer. 3 to Represent Winona At Annual Boys State Two Winona youths and a Rollingstone youth leave early Sunday for a week at Boys State. Leaving for a week at the University farm campus, St. Paul, are! Charles Meyer, of Holy Trinity High school, Rollingstone; Vernon Awes. jof Winona Senior High school, and Commercial Club Sponsors Carnival On Old Airport First District Editors Elect Albert Marshall Rushfdrd Names Selections for Boys, Girls State Rathford, Minn. Rushford's to GirU State and Boys State have been chosen. Miss lone Highum, daugh- jter of Mr. and Mrs. Arthur High- jum, is attending Girls State, being I held at the 4-H club buildings In !St. Paul June 15 to June 22. Her attendance is sponsored by the lo- cal American Legion Auxiliary. A high ranking student in the local high school and president of the junior class, lone, has taken. an active part in band, chorus, dramatics, declamation, G. A. A. and as assistant editor the school paper. She is a member of her church choir and publicity sec- secretary of the L.D.R., a Luther- an organization. Jack Engel, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Engel, will represent Rush- ford at Boys State at the state ag- riculture school, University Farm, Sunday to Saturday. His attend- ance is sponsored by the Rushford American Legion post. Jack has been a participant Sa and, chorus, as sports reporter f or school paper, in orchestra, as officer of his class, and as an out- standing athlete in football, basket- ball and baseball. Both Boys State and Girls State are efforts .to give young people a knowledge of American govern- ment through actual practice and to .educate them in the duties and rights of American citizenship. Jack Wieczorek, of Cotter High school. They were selected by school of- ficials, in co-operation with the American Legion, to represent their schools at the second annual Minnesota Boys State. Boys State teaches outstanding youths, who have shown capacities for leadership in their high schools, street, pleaded guilty when he was arraigned before Judge E. D. Liberaj in municipal court this morning. When Kaehler stated that he had never been convicted of a previous traffic violation, Judge Libera or- dered that the sentence be suspend- ed on the condition that he refrain from driving for pleasure for a pe- riod of 30 days. The sentencing of Robert Rymar- kiewicz, 309 Chatfield street, on a nonsupport charge, was held over until next Tuesday, Rymarkiewicz was arraigned In municipal court May 19 and sen- tencing was deferred at that time until this morning. A further de- ferment until next week was or- dered by the court today. Those who forfeited parking deposits for nonappearance in court today were Clifford Rackjw, 466 Chatfield street; Walter Neumann, 121 East Second street; Otto Hoer-j 506 East Sanborn street; I how governments are formed America. On arrival each boy is assigned ancl proceeds to organize itself for cam- paigns to elect officials to muni- cipal, county, district and state levels. The campaigns culminate in the election of Boys State governor. Competent advisers principal- The "World of Today" shows will be the second carnival to visit Winona this year. The show, spon- sored by the West End Commer- cial club, will open at the old air- port grounds, Monday and show for six days, with gates open at o'clock each evening. Sixteen rides, 12 side shows and 40 concessions are carried by the ly from the various departments show whlch Js said to be one of of the state government and jargest truck carnivals In the University of Minnesota are states. An area in the city hand. couid not be found to accommodate Awes, the son of Mr. and Mrs. tne show Fred Awes, 4240 8th street, Good-j Bus service wui be provided view, was vice-president of the sophomore class and president of the high school choir last year and has been named to the National Honor society and co-captain of next year's wrestling team. He served on the student council last year. Meyer is the son of Mr. and Meyer who live near mann, 506 East screei Rollingstone. He has been active in Emil Prondzmski, 858 East Fourth and bflnd at street; Mrs. Milton A. Goldberg, 116 East Broadway; Edward Hill, the cQrus and band at as well as otner EChool ac. 410 West Broadway; Harry his retirement in 1929. He is surviv- ed by his wife, Clara, five daugh- ters, Mrs. Francis Reese. Milwau- kee, Wis., Mrs. Jerome Speltz, Wi- nona, and Mrs. Alfred Speltz, Mrs. Alphonse Walch, and Barbara, all of Minneapolis; three sons, Dr. John, Philadelphia, Dr. Robert, New York city, and Paul, Iowa City, Iowa; 17 grandchildren; two sisters, Mrs.. William Diedrich, Rochester, and Mrs. Christy Schad, Plainview, Minn., and three brothers, Arnold, Plainview, Edward, Rochester, and Lawrence, St. Charles. meeting is the last before fqund the Nlcollet Clinic with which Y o u m a n s, Riverside, Winona; jroup he remained associated until Rajph Taylor, River Falls, Wis.; '-------1" Mrs. John Daley, Lewiston; L, L. Knutson, 450 Winona street; Ed Gil- berg, Trempealeau, Wis.; Arthur Brightman, 1031 West Wabasha street: Robert Grant, 189% Har- vester avenue; Selmer Gunderson, Fountain City, Wis., and August Dernhardt, Elmhurst lodge. 250 Attend Hotel Winona Open House About 250 guests attended the open house at the Hotel Winona Death of Bernard Sommer Bernard Sommer, 92, St. Bene- date. Home on Furlough RusWord, Minn. Force Staff Sergeant Robert Col- benson. Is spending a five-week furlough here at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. N. E. Col- benson. He has just returned from his station at Honolulu, Hawaii and is accompanied by his wife whom he married in Hawaii. At the end of his furlough he will be stationed in St. Louis, Mo. MARRIAGE LICENSES Canada, formerly of Qiut., oabtv., wiiuaua, Winona, died May 20 at St. chael's hospital, Cudworth, He had been in poor health for two years. Funeral ducted June 1 church and burial was at diet. Mr. Sommer was Quincy, HI., and married Botzet September 3, 1895. He ed from Winona to St. Benedict In) wieczorek ls son of Mr. and eacn evening Red Wing, Minn. Albert M. Marshall, Jr., publisher of the Red Wing Republican Eagle, was elect- ed president of the First District Editorial association at its annual meeting here Friday. He succeeds Donald Brown, editor of the Wa- seca Journal, G. L. Scbonlau, publisher of the Houston Signal, was elected vice- president, and R. J. Tommeraas, editor of the Mazeppa Journal, sec- retary-treasurer. New directors Damage In Flash Flood At Decorah, Iowa Decorah, erty damage from the flash flood of the North Bear creek branch earlier this week mounted past the today as Winneshiek county authorities continued their survey of flood-swept Highland Rochester Post-Bulletin and Rich-1 township, ard Pugh, editor of the Spring Val-i Wednesday's flood damaged ex- ley Tribune tensively one 40-foot and two 30- "Honorary degrees" for out- foot bridges and demolished a 20- standing achievements in journal- foot concrete culvert. County Su- ism were presented to three mem-jpervisor Ed Lund has determined bers of the University of Mlnne-jthat the bridges may be damaged Third and Cen- sota school of journalism faculty by Herman Roe, "dean" of the dis- trict editors and publisher of the Northfield, Minn., News. Recipi- ents were Professors Mitchell V. Edwin Ford and ter streets from to 9 o'clock Mrs. Laurence Wieczorek, S06 East King street. He was president of I the Junior class and has been ac-! tive in baseball, football and bas- ketball. Arrangements for attending Boys State, sponsored by the American! Legion, are in charge of David j Sauer, Americanism chairman for' Leon J. Wetzel post. Gas Blast Injures 2 at Farm Home space will be available. The show, which is playing in Missouri this Doctor of Rural week, goes to Virginia, Minn., fol- lowing its stand here. Commercial club members in charge of booking the show are Sydney Johnstone, chairman, Mar- vin Lehnert and Vinson Rice. About 30 club members will serve as ticket takers at each perform- ance. Olmsted County Population Rochester, 1950 population of Olmsted county is a gain of over 1940, the district census office announced today. That's a gain of 11 per cent over the 1940 population. The breakdown by villages and In a surprise move, Mr. Roe was with Waseca, Minn. Two men were in the Waseca hospital today, burned and bruised by a gas ex- 'cities: 6 p.m'. Friday to in- pjosion whicll wrecked a nearby redecorated and mo-1 guests 'and cigars to men attend- survivor. His wife died about 37 j years ago. Funeral of Mrs. Catherine Krier Funeral services for Mrs. Cath- erine Krier 117 East Howard street, will be Monday, at 9 a.m. Blalock who performed to ispect the redecorated ana home 'idernized and kitcheB Victims were Otto Evert and C. _j cilities, rooms, lobby and cocktail [D_ repair men for a Wa- _ lounge. Coffee and cakes werejseca gas company. Both were re- iserved, roses presented to women J corted ln sood condltion. blast came as the two sought a leak in a bottle gas line In the basement of the farm home of Mr. and Mrs. S. 0. Singlestad, living two miles northwest of the Mrs'. Singlestad, standing outside near the house, suffered cuts and bruises from flying debris. She was not hospitalized. Singlestad was in the barn and escaped injury. NEWS IN BRIEF Undergoes Operation. Do; ml Cole, five-year-old son of Mr. ti !__ _ OCO TKTueb "PTri Mrs' J. D. Cole, 362 West Howard street is at Johns Hopkins hospital, Baltimore, Md., after undergoing-an operation for a heart condition Thursday forenoon. Dr. Alfred 1950 Byron 384 Dover 264 Eyota Stewartville Rochester 1940 341 269 438 The city of Rochester, whose growth in the decade was un- der the lowest public estimate, could take comfort meanwhile in the growth of surrounding townships: 1950 Cascade Haverhill 651 Rochester Marion 1940 956 684 789 Richard J. Miller. 1172 West Fifth RE. Jennings official- street, and Clarice M. Johns, 566jin_ Buriai wm be in St. Mary's East Fourth street. Stanley A. Ledebuhr, 553 Mace- mon street, and Marian A. Matlas, Rev. V. E. Hilton, Rochester, will speak. H Rushford Legion Gives to Heart Fund Rushford. Rushford American Legion post has turned over the sum of S677 to the Minnesota American Legion foundation as its share toward the American Legion Memorial Heart Research Professorship campaign. Having committed itself to raise for this campaign the Min- nesota department of the Ameri- can Legion hopes to have the en- tire quota raised by the opening date of the state convention June 26 at Duluth. To date only remains to be raised. The local post's share to'be raised was John E. Schuster, 572 East Broad- way, and Elaine L. Sobeck, 465 West Fifth street. Lauris G. Petersen, 521 Winona street, and Phyllis A. Wessin, 507 Sioux street. Gerald J. Schultz, 527 East Wa- basha street, and Doretta J. Des- mond. 456Vi East Fourth street. Raymond J. Feehan, 451 East King street, and Alice S. Brown, 967 East King street. Roger W. Burmeister, 471 East Sanborn street, and Charlotte A. Burgdorf, 463 Mankato avenue. Junior A. Markwardt, St. Charles, and Patricia M. Theuner, 174 East Fifth street, Paul F. Klelnschmidt, 743 West Fourth street, and Irene M. Fratz- ke. 556 East King street. Jerome Borkovec. Berwyn. and Margaret Effertz, 276 Walnut street. ing. cemetery. Friends may call at the Burke funeral home Sunday after- noon and evening. Monsignor Jen- nings will say the rosary at p.m. Sunday at the funeral home and the Cotter Mothers at 4 p.m. Sunday. Funeral of Franklin W. Porter Funeral services for Franklin W. Porter, 30, 24 East Gates street, Rice Lake, Wis., former Winonan, who drowned June 4, whes the mo- torboat in which he' was fishing capsized, were conducted at 2 p.m.' June 7 at the Wesleyan Methodist church, Rice Lake. Military rites were conducted at the Orchard Beach cemetery. Mr. Porter was THE MARGARET SIMPSON HOME The adjourned annual meeting of the Margaret Simpson Home will be held at 125 West Fifth street (Laird-Norton in the city of Winona, at o'clock Tuesday evening, June 20th. 1950, for the purpose of hearing the reports of the officers, election of directors and such other business as may properly come before the meeting. All persons contribnting to or interested in the work of the Margaret Simpson Home are cordially invited to attend the meeting. A. WILLARD CARLSON, Secretary born February 1, 1920, at Beaver, ine LI CCli. Wlii (JG J wwilTT If HJQC z njj'r-i pssr sfecE SOUM HoUister and Evert told author' op lities the blast apparently i "'caused by a friction spark as Men On 10- IU follow for the next four days. .The boy spent Friday and today in an oxygen tent and was to remain in the hospital for another week. His address is Johns Hopkins Hospital, Halstad 3, Baltimore, Md. ALSOP Continued from Page One ture of the Republican problem. If they lose only a couple of the 13 challenged Republican which would be a low par for the they must then score a re- markable 70 per cent by capturing seven of the ten vulnerable Demo- cratic places. Otherwise there will be no reasonable hope at all of UJ f matches had been struck as they BoOST in investigated. Only some uprights remained of his home, Sinelestad said. He and his wife are living with his sister, Mrs. Albert Jergensen of Waseca, until their house is rebuilt. KWNO to Receive Award From Army Station KWNO has been award- The sheetmetal local and the Wi- nona Contracting Construction Em- ployers association reached agree- ment on a ten-cent wage boost last night. Negotiating Co _. by Gordon R. Closway, executive editor of The Winona Republican- Herald. Resolutions urging more interest m conservation, opposing an in- crease in certain classes of post- age rates and asking the U. S. government to refrain from the free printing of envelopes were passed. Memorials were passed in tribute to the late Mrs. H. G. Ras- mussen, Sr., of Austin and- A. J. Rockne of Zumbrota. The editors were guests of the staff of the state training school at a noon luncheon after which they were taken on a tour of the school. In the afternoon the visitors played golf at the Red Wing Country club, were taken on a scenic tour of the city, visited the Republican-Eagle office and were taken on a cruiser trip on the Mississippi river. Speaker at the evening banquet at the St. James hotel was Judge William C. Christiansen, a mem- ber of the Nurnberg war criminal tribunal who talked on "The S nificance of the Nurnberg Trials." Entertainment was presented by the Red Wing Elksters. seyond repair and has estimated this loss alone at almost Another flood casualty was historic Bear Creek woolen mill. More than 70 years old, the mill was operated during pioneer days by Nels Folkedahl for carding wool and spinning yarn. After enjoying a steady patronage from commu- nities on both sides of the Minne- sota-Iowa line for many years, the mill was abandoned because of changing business conditions. The carding machine was sold and is now in operation at the Decorah mattress factory and the building has been used for farm storage purposes for a number of years. Farm machinery and vehicles al- so were damaged by the flood. A longtime resident of the area, S. O. Sacquitne, stated that the creek was at its highest level In more than 40 years. One farmer who had left an emp- ty milk can out of doors found that it contained eight Inches of water when be returned. Oscar Knutson Funeral Monday Car Ditched in Highway Mishap The Herman Kloeppner family car had a narrow escape with a gasoline transport Thursday night. About a mile north of Homer, Minn., the Clearwater, Minn., car went In the ditch staying upright, when it was nudged by a passing gasoline carrier driven by Bert Beyerstedt, 178 West Fourth street. Byerstadt was attempting to pass the car when the collision occurred. He reported the accident to Sheriff George Fort who Inves- tigated the mishap. About damage was reported Taylor, Wis. Fun-L tte car by Kloeppner eral services for Oscar Knutson, and none to gasoline carrier. 72, Taylor area farmer for over The mishap was at p.m.' 50 years who died suddenly Fri- m day, will be Monday at 2 p.m. at Taylor Lutheran church and p m. at the farm home, south of Taylor. The Rev. B. J. Hatlem will officiate and burial will be in Wood- lawn cemetery, Taylor. BIRTHS to Mr. and Mrs. Phil Enstad, 525 Laird street, a son committees of two groups agreed last night on the new an Monday. The painters local, which asked for help from the Minnesota state labor conciliation service, has also ed a certificate of appreciation settled for ten cents. The new wage, Republican Senate after the Presi- dential election in 1952. Even if from the Army and Air Force. The station was notified today of the award for presenting the tran- scribed weekly program, Voice of the Army, for an extended period. -Wisconsin Leads In Air Marking Madison, Wis. effective June 1, is an hour. The electricians local is still ne- gotiating. Contractors have offered ten cents, but the local wants 15 cents. The contract rate now Is Funeral Services For Gale Infant WU. FU- Wisconsin neral services were held Wednesday June 16. FridavTollowmg a heart attack suf- Rowekamp.-Born to Mr. and Mrs. fered at the Black River Falls Rowekamp, Lewiston, a son pital where he had gone for treat-jJune 16. ment as he had not felt well dur- to Mr. and Mrs. ing the day. He and Mrs. Knutson iGarrel Sharp, West End Cabins, had driven to the hospital for med- a son June 18. iclne. He had not been 111 previous- to Mr. and Mrs. ly. iKenneth Waldo. 473 Washington He was_bom November 25, a son june 17. All births at the Winona General hospital. to Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Hirdler, Minneapolis, a Ion, David William, June 9 at Swe- dish Minneapolis. Mrs. Hirdler is the former Eris Chandler, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William hour effecttveiin North Dakota and came to the hour wage, enective man. Taylor' area when a young man. are his w" Knutson; one Palmer Victoria) Larson, route two, and two grandchildren, Eugene and Gary Larson. Friends may call at the Jensen Funeral home, Klxton, until 11 taken to the farm home. "Monday wken tTe wm be tChandler, Mton., former- ly Winona residents. Rice Lake, since that time. He was event, married October 25, 1947. Survivors The Republicans have a chance, are his wife: two stepchildren; his of course, of captunng the five es- mother, Mrs. Nicholas Hengtgen, sential seats -but hardlj more Rice Lake; one brother, Willard. chance than a bridge player who Minneapolis, and three sisters, Mrs. Genevieve Wilson, Rochester; Mrs. Dorpthy Heuer, Plainview, and Mrs. Vivian Trulson, Rice Lake. Both Mr. Porter and his com- panion, Albert G. Brown, were drowned in the accident. The bo- dies were recovered hours later. about two SUNDAY'S BIRTHDAYS Lambert Grochowski, Durand, Wis., six years old. Sharon Ann Meyer, Rushford, Minn., route one, four years old. has bid a grand slam, for exam- ple and needs three finesses to make it. In these circumstances there is a entirely nat- ural temptation to conclude that any means justifies what seems a, wholly desirable end. And this is the real danger. a good many conservative Republicans are be- coming convinced that a political technique now known as McCarthy- ism is the only means which will gain the end, and that this is justi- fication enough for the great harm which this technique can do- state aeronautics commission 're- ported today. The state has 885 air marked communities, comapred with 700 In Pennsylvania and 608 in Michigan. The markers consist of signs on roofs which designate distance and direction. Winona Dam Lockage Today a, M. Thompson with nine barges, up. a. Cities, with four barges, down. a. Simpson, with six bargee, up. John Edward, the Infant of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Pryrtarski, whose death occurred an hour alter he was born here Wednesday. The Rev Robert Hansen-'officiated with burial to Pine Cliff cemetery. Sur- viving are the child's parents, and three sisters, Anna Lou, Edna and May Jane. The family lives with Mrs. Pryztarskl's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Conrad Amundson. Stockton W.S.C.S. Stockton, Minn. W S C S will hold a meeting in the Methodist church basement Thurs- day at 2 p.m. All members win NOTICE to alt property and land in of Wi- nona, to doitroy oil noxloui who fall to do will cut and tho wit will bo to taxM. Office of Weed Inspection -----CITY   

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