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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: June 7, 1950 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - June 7, 1950, Winona, Minnesota                              Cloudy, Continued Warm Tonight, Thursday VOLUME 50, NO. 94 Indo-China Must Have U. S. Aid WINONA, MINNESOTA. WEDNESDAY 7, 1950___________________ It. Warren N Baseball Thursday p. m. KWNO-FM TWENTY-TWO PAGES m By Joseph Alsop Paris It is time to realize that the Western defense problem can be successfully solved, if it is en- ergetically tackled. But there is another point that must also be realized. There has been a shock- ing amount of fakery in the West- ern defense effort to date. The simplest possible illustration of the faking that is still being practiced is contained in the Pres- ident's recent request for for foreign arms aid. With- in this-total, a sum of is earmarked as an American con- tribution to the defense of South- east Asia, including Indo-China. Here is fakery which can be easily proven. In the first place, during his Par- is visit, Secretary of State Dean G. Acheson promised the French all-out American aid in the effort Free: Need Not Return To State Hospital at St. Peter to hold Indo-China against the Kremlin's imperialist drive. IN THE SECOND PLACE, the mere initial installment of aid re- quested by the French amounted to nearly worth of equipment and supplies. The long- range French program n o w in Washington comes close to No doubt these French re- quests may be sharply revised downwards, or partly met from American surplus. Yet no one can suppose we can finance all-out aid for the French with what is left over from after Indo- nesia, Burma and other claimant regions in Southeast Asia have al- so taken their shares. In the third place, neither Ache- son's promises nor the requests of the French are what compel us to make a massive effort to save In- do-China. A powerful French army 1- fighting in Indo-China. It needs- material aid, which can only come from us, to contain and throw back the Communist guerrillas. If the Communists triumph in Indo-Chi- na Asia will follow the same road. In short, in this matter, we ore not only breaking our own prom- ises and ignoring military realities, We are also defying the logic of events, which is the worst fakery same rules, unfortunately, (Continued OP Page 4, Column 1) ALSOP Mother and Son Plan to Live In St. Paul By AI Olson Wabasha, Minn. For the first time in 32 years. Harry Jacoby is a free man! To the 45-year-old man and his tiny gray-haired mother the news brought joy and tears as they walked from the dis- trict courtroom here Tuesday. Jacoby was told by District Judge Karl Flnkelnburg at about 4 p. m that he did not have to return to the state mental hospital at St Peter as had been expected. A telephone call assured court of- ficials here that Jacoby could be released directly and that a formal notice would be issued this morn- explained. There was nothing to show that Jacoby ever carried a weapon of that sort, nothing to prove that (Continued on Page 12, Column 7) Jacoby U. S. Embassy Staff Reduced At Warsaw Warsaw, XT. S State department has ordered 50 per cent reduction in the American embassy staff here. An attache re- fused to say whether the cut had been demanded by the Polish gov- ernment. (In Washington the State depart- ment made no comment but a spokesman said the Polish govern- ment has been pressuring for a re- duction in personnel at the Warsaw embassy. Similar action has been taken by other Soviet satellite gov ernments in eastern Europe.) An embassy source said the cut were ordered made by July 1. With a total American personnel of al most 50. the embassy staff include 18 members with diplomatic rank exclusive of officers of consular status. Eleven members of the U. S. mili tary, air and naval attaches' staff were ordered out of Warsaw in Apri following discovery of microphone iiio in the apartment of Lieutenant j farm near Fairfield. Colonel Anthopy Frank Levno, The shooting seer sistant military attache. ing. Jacoby had been cleared Tues- day morning of a first degree mur- er charge involving seven-year- Id Leo Schultz back in the spring! f 1918. Case Formally Dismissed Indicted on the a rst degree assault charge involv- ng the boy's mother, Mrs. Ella went on trial here Monday afternoon. Within 24 lours the case was dismissed. Defense attorneys moved to throw he case out at 11 p. m. yesterday n the grounds that the state had ailed to prove criminal agency nvolving the defendent. Judge Finkelnburg granted the motion, but waited until p. m. to explain his decision to the jurors. In his remarks he said that there was just purely circumstantial evi- dence in the case; that no md ever seen the crime and thati the state had only been able present "just a collection of cir-l cumstances which cast suspicion onj the defendant." He pointed out that there had been nothing presented in the case to show where the body was actu- ally found; nothing to describe the )oy's body, his clothing or other bruises. Details Lacking 'There was nothing to make you believe the boy was Injured in some, other way yet you can't sure." the judge said. He added that the state had shown a hammer was loand near the body "but you don't know how near. They didn't say what kind of hammer either, didn't show whether the hammer had blood j An Open Door Leads To A World Of Freedom lor 45-year-old Harry Jacoby at Wabasha Tuesday afternoon. A first degree murder case pending since 1918 against him had been dismissed and Jacoby had been Informed that he would not have to return to the St. Peter state hospital when the above picture was taken. Holding the door open for her son is Mrs. Bertha Jacoby, now of St. Paul. Republican-Herald photo Hope for 28 Abandoned in Plane Crash Revocation of Airline's License Asked Last October Miami, Fla. A searching investigation began today into the crash of a C46 plane in which 28 Puerto Ricans apparently lost their lives. Representatives of the Civil Aer- onautics board and the Puerto Ri- can government flew to San Juan and Charleston. S. C., to open In- i quiries. The destroyer U.S.S. SaufleVj I steamed toward Charleston with 37 j survivors. It was due to dock atj 3 p.m. Eight were known dead and scant hope was held for 20 others aboard the twin-eng.ine plane that went down in the Atlantic .275 miles east northeast of Miami Monday night. The 165-foot cutter Aurora, three coast guard planes and one air force craft continued to search the area for possible survivors, but of- ficial said there was little hope of finding any more. The pilot, co-pilot and steward (were among those rescued from the plane, which was en route! from San Juan to Wilmington, N.j C., with 62 Puerto Rican migrant I workers aboard. j The Civil Aeronautics adminis- tration said the airline operators, the Westair Company, currently are under investigation for alleged violation of safety regulations. A complaint was filed with the CAB in October asking for revoca- tion of the company's operating authority. It alleged the company's planes had been overloaded, that equipment had been operated while not in good condition, and James Roosevelt, a candidate for the governorship of California, and his wife, RomelJe, the former Independence, Wis., girl, emerge from voting booths after marking their ballots in primary election at Beverly Hills, Calif. 17 More Jap Red Leaders Purged By Russell Brines and Tom Lam'Oert By itusseii jjrrara miu using are licensee ana uyei- General MacArthur tonight ordered 17 more thg specifications ures from federal regulations. A Cab examiner completed hear- ings on the complaint last month but has'not yet submitted his find- ings. Irving H. Mansfield, treasurer of Westair company, said many of the charges were based on "badly confused" or "actually perjured" testimony. In a statement issued at Miami, Mansfield said "the aircraft we using are licensed and oper- iCommunists purged whether me nammer imu communists purgea. stains or not. There was not Banned were those responsible for the editorial policies of Akanata, word about Judge Finkelnburg j the party newspaper in Japan. ,.tt-_ explained. MacArthur, Allied occupation commander, said m a second letter P .....'to Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida, the new move was an alternate Third Shelton Brother Slain "method of correction" to closing the newspaper or re-establishing censorship. Both of these courses, he said, were repugnant to him. The new MacArthur purge order j came a few hours after the Red] party had named an eight man "leading group" to replace the 24 Politburo members purged by the government yesterday on MacAr- i thur's orders. Included in the new purge list was Katsumi Kikunami who was named as one of the eight in the "leading group" announced at par- House Tax Bill May Be Sent to Senate by July 1 as pan American World Airways. The engine which failed and caus- ed his tragedy came from a CAA- approved repair station." Reports from San Juan said the Higher-Ups In U. S. Dope Ring Sought By Bon Whitehead Washington-yPJ-A special Senate investigating committee set its sights today on an underworld ring reported to control a nation-wide (D.-Tenn.) said the committee was going after the "higher-ups" who government agents say are directing 800 people trafficking in drugs, white gambling, and murder.______...... _ U. S. Opposes West German Rearmament Washington Secretary of State Acheson said today the Unit- ed States opposes any rearmanent of Western Germany as a means of bolstering the security of the Californians Also Support Douglas, Nixon Case Defeats Gurney in S. D. G.O.P. Primary By The Associated Press James Roosevelt gradually in- creased his lead today for the Democratic nomination for gover- jnor of California as Governor Earl Warren won a smashing unprece- dented third term jnation. Sharing in national interest in yesterday's primaries was the de- feat in South Dakota of Senator Chan Gurney, top Republican on the Senate armed services com- mittee, by Representative Francis Case, veteran of seven House terms. Case, who campaigned on an ec- o n o m y-in-government platform. was the fourth congressman to win nomination yesterday for other of- fices and the third for the U. S. Senate. Representative Helen Gahagan Douglas, New Dealer, won the Democratic and Representative Richard M. Nixon, member of the House un-American activities com- mittee, the Republican nomination for senator in California. And Representative John E. Miles, a former governor, turned back the bid of David Chavez, brother of Senator Dennis Chavez, for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination in New Mexico. Senator Gurney was the second "We'll have to find some way toj get at those people on Ke- favuer told reporters. WUUC ilUlr Jii that there had been other depart- Commissioner H. J. Anslmger of C-4G passed inspection ing off at p.m. (C.S.T the Narcotics bureau gave the com- mittee a secret list of 800 names yesterday which senators said was the "who's who" in the narcotics ring. This information is the result of 20 years of investigation. Gambling, Crime Linked Senator Ferguson (R.-Mich.) predicted that the committee will find that big-time gambling and crime are linked with politics in many places. "If there is a big-time opera- Ferguson said, "it must have political tie-ups. Crime as a wholesale proposition can't exist without pay-offs to somebody in political power." Kefauver said his committee al- convincing proof that Fairfield, HI. -MV- Bullets from headquarters. others purged to- ambush were reported to have kill- mainly editorial work- ed the third Of the five Shelton ere mauuy brothers today. For decades the Sheltons have waged gang war in Illinois. Today's victim was Roy Shelton, about 56. A Wayne county deputy sheriff, Elmer Brown, said that Roy was shot to death by a hidden ers on the newspaper. day. It carried seven ten-man life rafts and 65 Mae West life jackets. The plane was the same type one that went into the Atlantic June 7, 1949, a few minutes after taking off from San for Mi- charter ICCbUJ illin -----------C. there is a link between big-time gambling and crime, including (D.-Fla.) was defeated by Repre- sentative George Smathers in a May 2 primary. With more than one-third of the state's precincts in, Roosevelt had a vote lead over Warren for the Democratic gubernatorial nom- ination. But Warren smothered Roosevelt in the Republican pri- mary and his total on both tickets at one point was nearly two to one over Roosevelt's total, California's unusual cross-filling system, permitting candidates to run in both major party primaries, had posed the interesting question of whether Warren could repeat his 1946 performance by winning the Democratic as well as his. own party's nomination. Mrs. Douglas1 lead in the1 Dem- ocratic Senate race was about two to one over her nearest opponent with one-third of the precincts in. West. Manchester Boddy, Los Angeles Acheson made thio statement at publisher, ran -second and Nixon j.j__ TO n a news conference m commenting on the testimony of General Omar: Bradley before a congressional' committee yesterday. Bradley said that rearming Western Germany tie-up does exist." ami, killing 53 persons. Another Miami-bound plane disappeared on a flight from By Francis M. LeMay Representative Doughton (D.-N.C.) set a July 1 b Ui-lC The announcement of the new j target today for the House to toss leaders of the Japanese party wasuhe veto-threatened slftshing bm into the lap f-Vio San Juan on December 27, with 32 aboard. 11 Anti-Fascists Ordered to Jail 1948, i I would strengthen the West "from evidence we a strictly military point of view, 'confirms our belief that thisj Acneson told reporters that Bradley had that he is not advocating rearm- ing the Germans and that his opinion was strictly a military it quite clear judgment. Acheson also said the. United 800 in Racket The chairman said an investiga- tion of gambling in Florida dis- closed names which are on the secret list of 800 involved in the narcotics racket. Senator Toby a com- member, said the list in- eluded the names of 50 ma- Ijor criminals anc.about 300 dope the cold David peauiers. .me ouiero. oaiu, war Chavez resigned federal judge lmk-i Acheson said the Western Puerto Rico to make the race, narcotic's traffic. ers must go forward_wlth_ UMir Th_e_Repubhcan nommee, States is willing to consider "any possibilities" proposed by Trygve Ihird. On the Republican side, Nix- on was far in front at this point. Friends of Case said it was not issues but hard work in "beating the bushes" that won lor him against Gurney in Sourth Dakota. Case's opponent in November will be John A. Engel, Avon attorney and a Truman supporter. South Dakota Republicans nom- inated Attorney General Sigurd, Anderson for governor. State Leg- islator Joe Robbie, Jr., was unop- posed for the Democratic nomina- tion. In winning the Democratic gub- ernatorial nomination, Representa- pOSSlOlilties prupusea uy ernatOriai nomination, nepreseuia- Lie for settlement of East-West tive Miles turned back the bid of differences. But, he added, "there the Chavez brothers for control of nasain outlawing the Communist party in (of the Senate Japan. But the outlook for any tax bill The United States last February broke off diplomatic relations with Communist-controlled Bulgaria be- cause of "restrictions and indigni- ties" against the American legation in Sofia. In answer to Communist on his pond creek bottom Bespectacled Etsuo Shiino, a for- ield. liner coal miner who was held in Tne snooung scene has echo-lp-ison ten years by Japan's form- ed to shots which killed Carl er militarists, heads the new Corn- all this year is dreary. Doughton's tax-framing house demands. U. S. diplomatic staffs] Big Earl survived, have been reduced in Hungarj. Cze-1 wounded again last choslovakia and Romania, with similar Washington-ordered reduc- tions usually following in the staffs in the U. S. of the eastern European countries. e o s ton reputed brains of the family munist group. It, too, may be gang on a dusty country road in purged. But if it survives it plans October 1947 at the age of 59.it0 direct Communist policies in A year ago. Big Earl Shelton, until the party congress in was seriously wounded in the same j the- autumn, area in May, 1949. ways and means committee stamped its final approval yesterday en ex- cise cuts estimated at almost dou- ble the limit President and was The announcement of the new leaders carefully refrained emu leaders unreiuuj' wouuucu ttSo'" from calling them members of the nick in the arm which he Joked j central committee, 24 of whose 260 to Graduate At Beloit College Bcloit, Wis. The largest class in history, 260 students, will be graduated Sunday at Beloit col- lege commencement exercises. Carey Croneis. Beloit president, will 'be the main speaker by re- quest of the senior class. The bac- calaureate sermon Saturday will about. Big Earl and Dalton, 42, who has kept himself aloof from the family's feuding, are the only sur- vivors. The other brother, Bernie, was killed by a lone marksman who picked him off in front of a tavern near Peoria, July 26, 1948. Roy Shelton was one of the less known brothers. He had no recent public record of trouble. He once served a year at Menard Prison for robbery with a gun. But in recent years, his activities center- ed on his farm. The killings of Carl and Bemie, were never solved. All the Shelton! members were banned from polit ical life yesterday by the govern- ment on MacArthur's orders. lent on o jon jpjjj newsmen, Jsui i wuum These dramatic new develop-j hope expect we can get a bill ments in the Japanese Communist over tnere (to the Senate) by ________nAwisv nft-a-r- rfpl- T_.T_ i tt Washington Chairman Ed- ward and ten other lead- ers of the joint anti-Fascist refu- gee committee were ordered to jail to serve sentences for contempt of Congress. They protested they are victims of an American effort to bolster "This combine is interlaced and sprawJed across plans "to create conditions said. D1C tilt ilium vi tv" Truman proposed. It is balking at (Fascist Spain as part of the cold the idea of accepting the President's war. proposal for an extra i All 11, including Novelist Howard tax on corporations. I Fast, were convicted of contempt Excise cuts would cover furs, jew-1 in refusing to produce records and elry, pocketbooks, movie tickets and scores of other items. Nothing Certain "There is nothing certain about what we will do or Dough- told newsmen, "But I would uproar came after the Russian del egation had for a second consecu- tive time boycotted an Allied coun- cil meeting during the day.- Lieu- tenant General Kuzma Dereyyan- 6iMO ko, head of the Russian mission Uions this year unless it accepts July i." This was Doughton's brief answer to a statement by Senate Demo- cratic Leader Lucas, of Illinois, that may vote no tax reduc- here, slipped out of the country late last month without bidding adieu to Allied officials. There was no immediate reac- tion here to the Moscow radio influences had the unlikely prospect of working until Lucas said, Until j_iuuaa v it is doubtful the House will set on ish refugees. The House committee jt is uuuuwiu thg Justice department have the bill by July I. calaureate sermon Saturday wiu were never solveci. AU the 5Tld C' P1U'- swings tte ambUSh weS'eVcUorf lips of Cleveland, Ohio. tern. Mondav this week. Little Earl Shelton, "34, nephew of Big Earl, WtAIMtK escaped unscathed in another j shooting. His companion, Dellos FEDERAL FORECASTS Iwylie, 35, was critically wounded Winona and vicinity: the back in an ambush cloudy and continued warm tonight in front of a garage and Thursday. Chance of showers Thursday night. Low tonight 65, high Thursday 90. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: and one half miles west of Fair- Maximum, 94: minimum 68; noon, 82; precipitation, none; sun sets tonight at sun rises tomorrow at Additional weather on Page 19. field. Violence has marked activities of the Shelton family, except broth- er Dalton, 42, who has lived (Jajet- ly as a farmer for several years. The Sheltons came into notorious prominence in southern Illinois during their war with the gang of Charley Birger 1919 to 1924. which ran from IS Dill uy j U-iy fi. .f, Senators Wherry of Nebraska, the I called it subversive and a Com- floor leader, and Taft of j munist front group. chairman of the Senate The Barsky case goes back to occupation government was return- ed to power in the upper house of the Japanese Diet. The Communists suffered defeat in the election. Catholic Service Convention Set West de Pere, Wis. The national convention of Alpha Del- ta Gamma fraternity, a Catholic service organization, will be held here June 9-10. More than 100 dele- gates from 15 colleges and univer- sities are expected to attend. reports of the organization for the House un-American activities com- mittee. Barsky will serve six months in jail and the others all directors of the anti-Fascist group will serve three months. All must pay fines. All 11 are from New York city. They were given time to make some telephone calls and 'say goodbye to their families be- fore going to the District of Col- umbia jail. The joint anti-Fascist refugee committee claims its main inter- est is in aiding Republican Span n of te enae committee, made it the spring of 1946. Barsky Ohio GOP clear however, that they and other Republicans want a chance to regis- ter their views on excise slashes. G.Q.P. Support Seen Wherry told reporters he regards tax reduction legislation as a "must." Tart said he thinks almost all of the Republicans will support excise cuts, although he added doesn't believe they should go at high as the House oommittee. Chairman George (D.-Ga.) of the Senate finance committee said he will try to get a bin through the Senate if the Eouse acts before July 1. He added it would be diffi- cult and probably would take all of August, at least. Chairman, and the ten others as members of the board of directors of the anti-Fascist refuge commit- tee refused to give the un-Ameri- can activities committee re'cords that would show the organization's members and financial supporters. In addition to Barsky and Fast, the defendants included two doc- tors, Dr. Jaco Auslander and Dr. Louis Miller; a language profes- sor, Dr. Lyman R. Bradley; H o u s e wife Marjorie Chodorov; Lawyers Harry M, Justiz and Ruthie Leider; Labor Union offi- cials James Lustig and Charlotte Stern, and Businessman Manuel Magana. Morrie Landsberj, right, Associated Press correspondent at Sacramento, Calif., the state capital ex- plains the operation of a vote tabulating machine to Governor Warren and members of STe San Francisco A.P. bureau early today. Warren has been assured nomination to succeed himself, "nfhe Sublican ticket in the California primary. Left to right are daughter Governor War- ren Mrs Warren son Bobby, and Landsberg. It appeared the governor would be opposed m the No- vembTfirTs by Jimmy Roosevelt, of the late President Roosevelt. CAP. Wirephoto to The Repub- lican-Herald.)   

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