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Winona Republican Herald: Tuesday, May 16, 1950 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - May 16, 1950, Winona, Minnesota                              Local Showers Tonight, High Wednesday 70 VOLUME, 50, NO. 76 Read 'Men Around Truman' on Page 4 Today W1NONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, MAY 16, 1950 Harold S. Streater New City Attorney Six-Day Rail Strike En Harold S. Streater TODAY- Schuman Plan Irks Commies By Joseph Alsop London The temptation is al- most irresistible to stress the comic aspects of French Foreign Named by Council To Succeed Bruski June 1 Harold S. Streater was ap- pointed by the city council Monday night to succeed S. D. J. Bruski who recently resigned from his position as city attorney. At present serving as president of the West End Commercial club, Mr. Streater will assume office June 1 following Mr. Bruski's resignation which becomes effective the end of this month. The newly-appointed city attorney has been invited to attend council sessions during the remainder of the month, however, to become acquainted with the of- fice. _. Mr. Streater, 33, was born in Wi- nona and has lived here continu- ously except for brief services with the federal government in Chicago iand three and one-half years war- time service with the Army. C. of Michigan Graduate He was graduated from the Uni- versity of Michigan in 1941 and is associated with Leo F. Murphy, Jr., in a law firm here. was accomplished after two ballots were taken at last night's council meeting. Seven Winona lawyers had sub- mitted applications for the position. They were Martin A. Beatty, Milton A. Goldberg, William A. Lindquist, kauris G. Petersen, Ernest D. Blair and John D. McGill. On the first ballot, the race nar- rowed down to the candidacies of Goldberg and Streater and the lat- ter won out on the second ballot by a 5-4 decision. Ballot Made Unanlmour After the election results had been announced, First Ward Alderman Loyde Pfeiffer observed that "I Truman Attacks Obstructionists In Congress at Chicago Cheer President's Party Declaration By Ernest B. Vaccaro Aboard Truman Train President Truman put opponents of his "fair deal" program on not- ice today he will fight to drive "obstructionists" out of Congress. He rode happily back to ington in the wake of Democratic! The appointment of Mr. Streater cheers to put new heat on those1 he termed "backward looking" senators and representatives to fall in line with the administra- tion. Speaking to a roaring crowd of 22000 party faithful overflowing LIE CONFERS 90 MINUTES WITH STALIN China's Position In U.N. Main Topic, Belief the Franco-German coal and steel complexes. Surprise plays precise- ly the part in international rela- tionships as the deception of hus- bands in French farces. Schuman s vitally important move has sur- prised and upset enough people to provide laughs for a month. In brief, the idea of a French initiative at this time was Foreign Minister Schuman's. The idea of taking the initiative by offering economic union of the French coal and steel complexes, with the Bri- tish and other continental producers coming in if they choose, was the Idea of the great wartime ad- ministrator, Jean Monnet. In the preparatory phase, absolute secre- cy was the rule, for the very good reason that the "Comite des the vastly powerful asso- ciation of French steel masters, would have stopped the project if they had heard of it in time. Un- til the American delegation reach- ed Paris, no one knew what was afoot except Monnet, Schuman, French Premier Georges Bidault, of course, and two or three mem- bers of Schuman's personal staff. Even the French high commis- sioner to Germany, cois Poncet, was probably because ing connections with QLC Forges. AT THEIR FIRST jbelieve any one of these men would mve made a good city attorney. I'm ure that we were fortunate in hav- ing so many well-qualified appli- cants for the position." A unanimous ballot was cast for the appointment of Mr. Streater as city attorney. Mr. Bruski submitted his resigna- tion to the council last Wednesday night when he told the council that iie press of. his private practice made it necessary for him to resigrf from the position which he has held since 1947. 3 Billion Aid For Europe Ready for Vote By Joseph C. Goodwin Washington A 000 program of American econom- ay lc aid to Europe and ottiernon wm _ _ left unconsulted, Communist areas ''ready H year, and the following of his long-stand- nal votes in both chambers of Con we are a party Good Show Chicago W) Victor A. Johnston, Republican observer whom President Truman bis "little says this about Mr. Truman: "Nobody hates him. But no- body seems to love him very much, Johnston traveled by airplane to observe Mr. Truman's west- ern trip and prepare G.OJP. ammunition. He was eating a meal alone In the midst of dozens of Dem- ocrats at the Blackstone hotel yesterday when a reporter aik- ed how he liked the Chicago Democratic shindig. He replied: "It was a good hoopla medicine show, maybe, but good. The President is a Tery master- ful politician and has excep- tionally good staff and research work behind him." This Airriew shows four horses marooned on haystack near Morris, Manitoba, as flood waters of the Red river engulfed the area. (AP. Wirephoto.) 'Polities' Charge Hurled at McCarthy By Oliver W. De Wolf McCarthy's demand that Secretary Of State Acheson be fired drew a counter blast today from Senator. Myers of Pennsylvania, who said McCarthy is just talking politics. Myers the assistant Democratic leader of the Senate, denounced McCarthy's demand a "deliberate and.malicious-attempt; to under- _ the Comite MEETING, gress Schuman mentioned the project to Secretary of State Dean Acheson, but with so little emphasis or dra- ma that Acheson did not grasp its significance. The cat only really came out of the bag the next day. A member of the American dele- gation urged members of Schu- man's staff to be more construc- tive, remarking that France had almost abandoned the role of a great power by taking so negative an attitude about Germany. Schuman-Monnet plan was the Chicago stadium, the President last night gave his party this key- note for action: The Democratic party will car- ry on its fight for its program during the remaining months of the 81st Congress, and, after that is over, we will carry on the fight in the 82nd Congress. "I hope that by next January some of the. worst obstructionists will be removed. Long Fight Planned "We will carry on the fight, this year be- that Is not then fully explained to the excited Americans, just as it was about to be presented to the French cab- inet. Immediately after the French cabinet meeting, the plan was pub- The reactions of all licly revealed, parties were instantaneous, and extremely instructive vivid Chairman Kee (D.-W.Va.) of the House foreign affairs committee predicted House passage without difficulty. He said he wouln bring the measure up for a vote Wed- nesday. The big global aid program was sprung from a week-long deadlock yesterday by agreement between Senate and House conferees. It was a partial victory both for the administration and for an economy bloc which had fought to trim it. As finally agreed on by the con- ferees _ named by the two cham- bers to iron out differences be- tween the Senate and the House versions the bill provides up to for the third year of the four-year Marshall plan for Europe's economic recovery. It also calls for: for Korea; for non-Com- munist forces in the China area; for Palestine refugees; for the international afraid to dream and plan and work for a better future." The Chicago stadium, the setting his own nomination for the vice-presidency in 1944, resounded with whistling, handclapping, yells and cheers, as the gray-haired ex- ecutive enunciated the party doc. trine. The President's speech climax- ed a three-day Jefferson jubilee celebration which brought cabinet members and Democratic party leaders from throughout the Russ Reduce East German Reparations Berlin Russia announced a sharp cut in east Germany's war reparations bill today. The news touched off a big Communist propaganda campaign extolling Soviet "generosity and helpful ess." Anti-Communist Germans and By Eddy Gilmore Minister Jo- seph Stalin and United Nations Secretary-General Trygve Lie talk- ed for 90 minutes at the Kremlin last night. The conference climaxed the "Save the mission which had brought Lie half-way round the world to see the Russian leader. Diplomats speculated that Chi- na's representation in the U.N. was a major topic at the discussions. No details of the talks were disclosed but it is not thought here that the Russians showed any signs of modi- fying their refusal to participate in any U.N. organization in which ihiang Kai-shek's government i represented. Russia has demanded that thi Peiping government of Mao Tze tung be recognized as China's rep- resentative in the United Nations. Molotov Present 'Present with Lie and Stalin at the meeting were Vice-Premier V. M. Molotov and Foreign Minister Andrei Y. Vishlnsky. The inter- view came after to ease East-West conferred with President Truman in Wash- ington and with top officials Jn London, Paris and here in Moscow. The 90-minute interview was con- sidered a rather long one for the Soviet premier. It was considered here that Lie and Stalin discussed not only the China question but _____r_ __ other basic points of East-West mine" 'America's "leadership in for- tension as well. e, affairs There was speculation that Lie accused the Wisconsin Repub- might discuss his talk with Stalta 42 More Names Needed to Put City Over Winona needs 41! more names to push it over the 000-mark in the 1950 Each one worth a dollar to the Informant. tip to 10 a-.m. today 80 per- sons not counted in the census campaign had been reported to the Association of Commerce office. The campaign to find 122 persons not already counted and thus put the city in the 25 000 plus class continued to- day and A. J. Anderson, sec- retary-manager of the associa- tion, said a record was being kept of the reported names and if a check against the official record shows no dupli- cation 51 will be paid for each name submitted. The association's telephone number is 2326. The association's mailing ad- dress is 117 Center street. Chiang Yields Chushan Islands To Communists between Allied officials promptly Prime- Minister Stalin's repara- tions cut an empty gesture and "phony bookkeeping" aimed at countering the recent announce- ment that occupation controls would be relaxed in western Ger- many. Moscow radio disclosed Stalin in- formed east German Premier Ot- to Grotewohl that Russia was cut- ican of being "more interested in the next election" than "in the fu- ture well being and peace of the world." Senator Brewster on the other hand, gave support to McCarthy's criticism of Congress. "For the good of the Brewster said in an interview, "it ought to be possible to secure men (as secretary cf state) who would command more general confidence and do the job that is required in this very critical time." Brewster, chairman of the Re- publican senatorial campaign com- mittee, said he thought both Re- publican and Democratic senators had shown a iRck of confidence in Acheson's foreign policies. Acheson is in London attending h 
                            

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