Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - May 12, 1950, Winona, Minnesota                              Local Showers Tonight, Continued Rather Mild VOLUME 50, NO. 73 Read 'Men Around Truman' on Page 4 Today WINONA, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 12, 1950 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWENTY-TWO PAGES Man Drowns in Kellogg Boat Mishap Theodore Christiansen, Jr., Named to Supreme Court Truman Renews Plea for T.-H. Law Repeal Warns Act Perils Labor Gains of Past 15 Years By Ernest B. Vaccaro Butte, Mont. President Truman said today he will not "cease to fight" for the repeal of the Taft-Hartley labor law. "The Taft-Hartley law hangs over the head of labor, threaten- gains of 15 ing to destroy the he said. "There It will hang until we are able to replace It with a law that is fair to management and labor alike." The President, in one of a series of major talks on his cross-coun- try crusade for the Fair Deal, said In a prepared address: "That is something we must do, B; Jack Mackay St. Christianson, Jr., St. Paul lawyer, today was appointed by Governor Luther Youngdahl as a member of the Minnesota supreme court to replace Associate Justice Harry H. Peterson. Governor Youngdahl made the announcement within 24 hours after Judge Peterson announced his resignation to become a candidate for the nomination for governor on the Democratic-Fanner-Labor ticket. Christiansen is the son of a for- mer Minnesota governor, the late Theodore Christianson of Dawson, Minn. The new jurist, whose ap- pointment became effective imme- diately, Is 36 years old, married and the father-of two children. Governor Youngdahl said his new appointee is one of Minne- sota's "really outstanding active attorneys" and "not only has the respect and confidence of the law- yers of the state but also of the general citizenry as well." Praises Ability "T H e o d o r e Christianson has shown before in his many the Supreme appearances said Governor Youngdahl, "that he has Idle in Rail Strike Up To 200, Chicago More thousands of railroad workers joined the ranks of the Idle today laid off by the deadlocked firemen's strike against four major carriers. not only for the sake of labor, for the sake of the whole country. Boosts Fair Deal "I believe profoundly that tiie Taft-Hartley act is a substantial Infringement of the basic freedom to bargain collectively." Mr Truman's address, from the rear 'platform of his cross-country gpeclal train, was one of series he has trying to sentiment for the Pair In which whip up The President said that the "avowed intention" of the spon- sors of the Taft-Hartley law "was to strengthen the hand of manage- ment." "To do Mr. Truman said, "they devised a clever law which insidiously undermines the strength of labor unions." Mr. Truman struck back against of his "Fair Deal" pro- the ability, integrity, and Workers in many other key in- ment required of a good jurist. also were getting lay-off and others were threatened together with his exceptional legaljwith forced idleness. The three- knowledge and experience Indicate day-old strike by firemen appeared to have made idle near- ly workers already, Includ- ing some rail employes. There wasn't a sign of peace in the nation's biggest rail strike since May, 1946. There was, however, the first flareup of violence on some of the strikebound lines. Southern Lines Suspended Shortly after two freight trams were reported ambushed and fired upon near Knoxville, Tenn., the Southern Railway lines suspended all operations in the area. A he will be a very able and under- standing justice in our highest court." Christianson was born June 4, 1913, the son of Theodore and Ruth Christianson. He is a brother of Robert J. Christianson, Minneapo- lis attorney. He received Is law degree from the University of Minnesota in 1937 and was admitted to the Minne- States same year. In St. Paul Law Firm Christianson has been a partner in the law firm of Cummins, Cum- mins, Christianson Hammond in St. Paul. He has been specializing in probate and appellate practice. From 1943 to 1946 he Was a fighter director officer hi the Unit- ed States Naval Reserve, and served in both the Atlantic and Pa- cific war theaters. Christianson served also as a radar control officer under Rear Admiral L. F. Reifsnider through- out the Okinawa invasion, and lat- er served in the same capacities under Vice Admiral Frank J, Fletcher, commander of the North Pacific forces, in both the Aleu- tians and Japan. ing in the strikebound area. The railroads again refused to Theodore Roosevelt critics gram. "All of you, I am sure, the President said, "have heard many cries about government interfer- ence with business and about Socialism.' "I should like to remind the gentlemen who make these com- plaints that if events had been al- lowed to continue as they were P_ m rile to interfere with-and almost been sold for scrap. strlke was coal pro. spokesman said the move was made to protect the road's em- ployes. An acting firemen on one train was shot in the arm. Pickets outside the Knoxville switch yards denied they fired any shots, but said they were stoned. There were other minor distur- bances on the strikebound New York Central Lines in two Indiana cities. The Southern, the New York Central and a third struck carrier the Santa Fe are operating only emergency skeleton service. The Pennsylvania, struck west and north of Harrisburg, is not operat- accept what the rail union describ- ed as a modified demand of its original proposal. The Brother- hood of Locomotive Fireman and Enginemen struck to enforce its demand multiple for a second fireman on unit diesel locomotives. which car-1 else to interfere surely we would have Socialism In this Socialism. "The truth is that government action during the last 17 years has been the salvation of private busi- ness in the country and has strengthened the private enter- prise system against Socialism, Communism and all other "Don't let anyone tell you that the government should retire tc the sidelines while the national economy goes back to the days of 'boom and bust.' The power of the government exists for the people to use. It would be folly for the people to be afraid to use their collective strength through the government." Mr. Truman told the Butte au- dience that the government's most important single economic goal "is to see that there are enough jobs for those who need them." In a speech at univer- sity in Spokane, Wash, Mr. Tru- man appealed to Congress to pass a pending fair employment prac- tices commission (FEPC) bill. In his call for enactment of the civil rights bill, the President said "we can advance the common welfare without harming the dissenting mi- nority." He obviously was refer- ring to the Senate's filibustering southern Democrats. Uniform Truck License Urged Milwaukee Ben Marcus, state motor vehicle commissioner, said Thursday truckers are mov- ing registration from Wisconsin to surrounding low-fee states and then sending their vehicles back Into the state to carry on their business. Marcus spoke at a regional meeting of the American Associa- tion of Motor Vehicle Administra-l tors, representing 12 Midwestern states. He told them he had no solution to the problem. The group expressed the opinion that if states fail to develop a re- ciprocity program for interstate trucks the federal government will do it for them. Marcus said he did not like the present situation because Wiscon- sin, with high registration fees, Is being imposed! upon by truckers from surrounding low-fee states. The Cleveland and Buffalo Steamship Company, owner of the vessel, announced Thursday ship was sold April 15 to duction in Western Pennsylvania and Indiana. With no empty cars j to carry away the mined coal, 14 the j big mines and several smaller Cream City Lumber and Wrecking I ones in western Fennsyl- Company of Milwaukee. The Theodore Roosevelt operat- ed mostly on Lake Michigan and vania. The mines have an estimated combined daily output of Lake Superior and from 1927 to j tons. Some miners may be 1940 it operated almost continuous-'made idle by next week. In In- ly out of Chicago. In 1946 it wasjdiana, half of the state's coal used between Chicago and St. Jo-1 mines had closed -because of lack seph and Benton Harbor, Mich. 'of rail transportation. Retired Mabel Area Teacher Dies of Burns Clothing Catches Fire While Burning Leaves Mabel, Minn. Third degree bums suffered when her clothing caught fire as she., was burning leaves, proved fatal Thurs- day afternoon to Mrs. Fred Kop- pen, 76, former rural school teacher and well-known Hesper township resident. Mrs. Koppen, who is president of the Hesper 100-Year Club, was watching a bonfire In her farm home, yard just southwest of here Wednesday morning when sparks set her dress afire. Marie Bjertness, a hired girl, came running from the house when she heard Mrs. Koppen scream, and at- tempted to roll the flaming body on the grass. Mrs. Koppen was taken to a La Crosse hospital where she died at p. m. yesterday. Surviving are her husband, o son, L-Tster, a. brother John Me Mc- Mullin, of Mabel, and one sister, Mrs. Janie Freeman, Esmond, N. D. A daughter is dead. Mrs. Koppen was the former Anna .McMullin, who was born in Hesper township and spent her en- tire life in this area. She was mar- ried in 1896 and lived on the same farm. Funeral arrangements are not completed, but services will be held at the Hesper Friends church, the Rev. Naomi Olson officiating. Bu- rial will be in the Hesper cemetery. 21 Warships Leave Hawaii For Far East Pearl Harbor A task force of 21 American warships headed west for the Orient today. It will relieve ships of the Sev- enth fleet. But the main purpose of the task group will be to show the American flag along the shores of Asia. The carrier Valley Forge bead- ed the force. It has aboard 33 jet planes, first of the speedy Ameri- can warplanes to be shown in the Orient. There are 47 other planes aboard. Rear Admiral John M. Hoskins will command the task force, which also will include two snork- el-type kind that can stay underwater indefinitely. Besides the Valley Forge, other ships in the task force are the crusiers Juneau and Rochester, the aircraft tenders Curtiss and Suisan, the transport Wantuck, the This Boat And Motor figured in the drowning of Robert Lyons, 34, of Rochester, Thursday evening on Peterson lake, just above the Alma dam on 'the Mississippi. Lyons 'and' a companion, Charles Dornack also of Rochester, were testing the boat and motor when they were thrown overboard. Dor- nack. was rescued. Bejmbllcan-Herald photo Reorganization Defeat Seen As Truman Setback Washington Senate rejec- tion of a presidential plan to re- organize the National Labor Re- lations board was cited by Repub- licans today as proof that Congress won't go for the Truman "Fair U. S. Opposes Sharing A-Bomb With Allies By Douglas B. Cornell of sharing the atomic bomb with America's Deal." I North Atlantic allies brought the hot reaction from Congress: Not a (chance! Among the men who would have to pass a law permitting such a move, there was consternation at the mere knowledge that the subject has been discussed by military offi- cials in a preliminary way, even without approaching decisions or I recommendations. By a 53 to 30 margin with 18 j Senators and House members, Democrats, chiefly from the South, j Democrats and Republicans, cried voting'with 35 Republicans the j out against letting any A-bombs Senate nullified the NLRB revision that Mr. Truman wanted. About an hour later it junked by a 65 to 13 count another Truman proposal involving the comptroller of the currency. Senator Wherry of Nebraska, the destroyers Dehaven, Brush, Taus-j Republican floor leader, said the sig, Mansfield, Maddox, Moore, labor board showdown "proved that Scott Lucas has only about one-third of the Senate with him when the President wants to put over his 'Fair program." Majority Leader Lucas (D.-H1.) led the opposition in the futile ef- Two Yonnf Men, Gerry Genik and Ken Donald of Winnipeg, re- visit the Genik home on East Kildonan street in Winnipeg after the dike broke, flooding the area. Gerry just couldn't resist the urge to try to call his friends but the phone was out of order. The day before, the Genik family could walk into the yard and home without getting then- feet wet. CAP. Wirephcto to The Republican-Herald.) Eversole and Shelton, the destroy- er escorts Fletcher and Radford, the submarines Remora, Catfish and Segundo and the oilers Nava- sota and Passumpsic. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity: Generally 'air tonight and Saturday except ocal showers likely late this after- noon or early evening. Continued rather mild. Lowest tonight 50, highest Saturday 74. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 77; minimum 46; noon, 77; precipitation, .04; sun sets tonight at sun rises tomor- row at DAttl KIVER BULLETIN Flood Stage 24-hr. Stage Today Chg. Red Wing 14 13.6 Reads .........12 12.0 Dam 4, T.W....... 13.1 Dam 5, T.W....... 10.5 Dam 5A, T.W. 11.7 Winona........ 13 13.4 Dam 6, Pool 12.3 Dam 6, T.W....... n.5 Dakota 11.2 Dam 7, Pool...... 11.4 Dam 7, T.W....... 10.8 La Crosse 12 11.7 Tributary Streams Chippewa at Durand.. 9.3 Buffalo above Alma 2.0 Whitewater at Beaver.. 13 Trempealeau at Dodge 1.2 Black at Galesvflle ___ 7.0 La Crosse at W. Salem 1.8 Root at Houston .....11.4 .51 Root at Hokah .......40.4 .lj RIVER FORECAST (From Hastings to Gnttenberg) Flood warnings are continued ,3 .4 4- .5 -8 -7 .7 .6 .8 -f .8 ..7 fort to plan. Asked save the .reorganization about the combination of southern Democrats and Repub- licans, Wherry said "any time a real crisis comes up about the 'Fair a coalition will take control to ward it off each time it is a different coalition." Tlie NLRB vote was another get out of American hands. The lone voice in support of sharing was that of Chairman Vin- son (D.-Ga.) of the House armed services committee. Of course, a lot of minds could change if we seemed to be getting definitely closer to war. But for the time being there obviously is no possibility that the lawmakers would consent to arming our cold partners with atomic weap- war ons. Key members of the congres- sional atomic, foreign affairs and armed services committees said that they are against it. For that matter, some of the Menomonie Pair Bound Over on Charge of Arson Menomonie, Wis. Captain James J. Janasky, Air Force re- cruiting officer, and his wife, Mary, Thursday were bound over to circuit court on charges of set- ting fire to their rented house to collect insurance. Bond for each was set at by County Judge Carl Peterson at the end of the preliminary bear- military experts In" the Pentagon ing. are against it, on grounds A-bombs The house rented by the J ana- would be safer in American hands, skys burned down January 11, with less chance for information leaks or for U. S. atomic weapons to fall into Russia's grasp. victory for Senator Taft But on the other side is the ar- Truman, whojgument that it might be quicker over President wants to repeal the Taft-Hartleyjand cheaper to arm the Allies with labor law. I A-bombs, and planes to carry Taft, in a separate interview, them, than to equip ground troops, ff from faulty furnace and the said the vote indicates that Condor naval or air forces, with tanks, to escape gress "is against most of thesejguns, ordinary bombs and other "alnes wlm 'Fair Deal' measures." 'conventional weapons. Deputy State Fire Marshal Willi- am C. Rohan testified Thursday that some clothing found in the ruins appeared to be oil saturated. Judge Peterson denied a defense request for dismissal. The couple's attorney contended the fire start- Connecticut Firm Robbed of Thompsonville, Conn. gunmen wearing gas masks today slugged. and robbed three Brink's about 3 a.m., C.S.T., about an hour before the third shift was due to leave the plant. The four men, all believed arm- 7" with shotguns, apparently es- caped in an automobile after they tied the guards. The guards were so badly beaten on the head and face they were from Red Wing to La Crosse crest- ing at Red Wing Saturday Wi- nona 13.7 Sunday; La Crosse 12.3 late Sunday or early Monday; Lansing 13.0 Tuesday, and Prairie du Chien 15.2 feet Wednesday next. There will be little change in the Chippewa or the St. Croix will Additional weather on page 19. guards of in the pay room! On January 17, a band of mask- -21 of the Bigelow-Sanford carpet fac-jed gunmen held up Brink's Incor- tory. jporated, offices in Boston and es- caped with approximately 000 in cash and cheks. No trace of them has been found. Last night in Wilkes Barre, Pa., a burglar alarm foiled an attempt to rob the Brink's office there. The alarm sent a squad of police first to the office. They found the door open but nothing apparently had been taken. Boston police said they see no connection between the Thompson- ville holdup and the fabulous mil- lion dollar-plus robbery in Boston. "At this one police offi- cial said, "it seems like tfie Thompsonville gang was a differ- ent one than pulled the Boston place job." hospitalized for treatment. The holdup men were at believed to be trapped in the plant but a minute search of the build- ing failed to reveal trace of them. In Washington, the F.B.L said numbers of its agents have .enter- ed the case. They are working with local authorities on the theory that an interstate money shipment nvers mvolvedi making the offense a federal one. I The daring robbery took flames with their four-year-old son. He said personal property the Janaskys had Insured for with the Farmers' Mutual Insur- ance Company, actually was worth much more. 20 Students Protest Compulsory ROTC Madison, Wis. A group of 20 students, carrying antimilitary signs, staged an unexpected but brief demonstration at a Universi- ty of Wisconsin. ROTC inspection at Camp Randall Thursday. Officers of the Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps were on hand to watch the reserve officers in action when the uninvited guests, both men and women, put in their appearance. The signs read: "Militarism is un-American. "No A-bombs or Molotov Cock- tails." f "Is Compulsory ROTC Demo- University police caught up with the demonstrators shortly after the signs were carried in front of the reviewing stands. The intruders were rushed out the gates. Robert Lyons Of Rochester Swept to Death Companion Rescued When Lurch Throws Pair From Boat Kellogr, swollen Mississippi river early to- day yielded the body of Robert Lyons, 34, of Rochester, who lost his life In a twilight boating accident Thursday. Lyons drowned about p.m. in Peterson lake, four miles above here. A companion, Charles Dor- nack, also about 32 and from Ro- chester, was rescued. The lake Is formed by waters held back by Alma dam, one-quarter mile be- low. The men were testing a new boat and motor when the mishap occurred. They were going up- stream about 300 yards off shore. The boat apparently hit some de- bris, lurched and threw the two men overboard. Dornack's mother, Mrs. August Dornack, was standing on shore and witnessed the accident. She called her husband, and he ran down to Schnell's resort, about 300 yards away, to get help. Donald Schnell, the proprietor, went to the rescue in his rowboat. He said that when he pushed Into the water, he could see both Lyons and Dornack swimming for shore through the cold, strong current. 'Rescues Dornack Schnell reached Dornack, who was exhausted, and pulled him in- to the rowboat. By that time, Ly- ons could not be located. Dragging operations were begun and continued for several hours. Wabasha County Sheriff John Ja- cobs directed efforts to find the body, aided by Deputy John Heldt, Game Wardens Don Cook and Willis Krue'jer and also Wal- ter Passe of Wabasha. Efforts were resumed again ear- ly today. At grappling hooks located Lyons' body, not far from the spot where he fell Into the water. The accident occurred about one mile below Pugh's Point, a local- ity well known by fishermen of this area. With the water exremely high and current running strong, there is much debris being car- ried downstream. Sheriff Jacobs said he believed the boat struck a half-submerged object, and the Impact was enough to throw i5e men off balance and into the wa- ter. Watching- Boat Mrs. Dornack said she was watching the boat proceeding up- river when It suddenly quivered and she saw Lyons and her son thrown overboard. Both were sit- ting in the boat when the accident occurred, she said. The boat did not capsize and It continued up the lake until it beached itself about one-quarter mile away. Ken Schacht, another resort keeper, said that it was evi- dent the motor had not been set at full speed because the boat touched shore gently and stopped. The elder Dornacks. formerly of Rochester, have a cabin on the river and have made this their home since last summer. Their son and Lyons were visiting them last night. Mr. Lyons is survived by his wife, Bernice; four children, Pa- tricia Ann eight, Thomas James six, Kathleen Marie two, and Mar- gaz-et Diane five months, and his mother, Mrs. E. J. McGrath, all of Rochester. His wife is the former Bernice Moeding of Ely and is the sister of Dale Moeding, 451% West San- born street, Republican-Herald ad- vertising salesman. Funeral services are tentatively set for Monday at Rochester. Freedom Comes Ahead of Budget Humphrey Says Minneapolis Freedom comes ahead of the ba'anced bud- get or economy, Senator Hubert Humphrey (D.-MInn.) told Twin Cities businessmen Thursday. "We want economy, but more than that we want want a balanced budget but not at the expense an unbalanced America or a Communized the senator said. Humphrey spoke last nisht at the annual dinner of the Minneapo- lis Junior Chamber of Commerce. He gave a similar talk at a lunch- eon meeting at the St. Paul Kl- wanis club, American businessmen must realize the seriousness of the cold war and "decide if you want to save your sons or save your dol- he said. Humphrey said that the govern- ment "has chosen the path of why your taxes are plus the cost of past wars and national defense against tue possibility of a future war."   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication