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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: February 8, 1950 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - February 8, 1950, Winona, Minnesota                              COLDER, LIGHT SNOW TONIGHT WINONA, MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY KWNO-FM fops In Radio Entertainment EIGHTEEN PAGES Strength Held Best Peace Weapon TODAY- Timetable Of Soviets Speeded By Joseph and Stewart ALsop The evidence is In- creasing daily that the Soviet time table has moved into a new phase. As one authority puts the krem- lin has now passed the point thatj Hitler passed with the reoccupa- tlon of the Rhineland. The krem- lln is now beginning the phase of accelerated preparatory action of picking off the exposed salients before attacking the main positions Hitler began with the inva- sion of Austria. AH the kremlin's bluff and blust- er of the last four years have only served to conceal the central real- ity, which has been the active, in- tensive build-up of Soviet military strength. The new phase is now opening, just as It did in Hitler's case, because the rearmament ef- fort has begun to produce, solid results. Hence the kremlin Is en- couraged, Just as Hitler was, to take larger measures and to run greater risks. A. GREAT DEAL of pure non- gense has been talked and written on this head, mainly to the effeci that the Soviet Union has enjoyed dominant military power ever since the end of the second world In point of fact, however from the end of the war until this year, the Soviet Union had no atomic bomb, no air defense what- ever, and no solid Industrial base. The Western confederation, on the the other hand, possessed atom- ic bombs. Despite demobilization, the Western confederation also re- tained the strategic air power to deliver these bombs to the unde- fended cltiM of Russia. This situa- tion'WftS a decisive deterrent as long as It lasted. But this situation has now been liquidated by Soviet rearmament. As Secretary for Air Stuart Sym- ington pointed out In his courage- ous and Illuminating Texas speech, the kremlin has not merely over- come all the difficulties listed above. It has also built up the greatest air force and submarine fleet In the world, to supplement the red army's strength. THE KREMLIN'S planners are Justified in deriving a glowing new self-confidence from their revolu- 25-Cent Egg Support Price to Be Continued Washington Already swamped by eggs, the govern- ment will continue through March to support the prices the fanner gets for eggs at 25 cents a dozen. The Department of Agricol- tnrc announced yesterday that it alsu will maintain its prices for dried eggs at 96 cents a pound. The department now owns worth of eggs it doesn't know what to do with, and an official commented re- gretfully, "hens are laying their fool heads off." Under the egg support pro- gram, the government buys eggs at 75 per cent of price established as fair to both egg producers and eggr eaters. In the past two years, the government has accumulated about 000 pounds of dried eggs which nobody seems to want. Russ Spy Activity Mounting in U. S. undercover activity in the United States- was reported today at an all-time high. The report came from a lawmaker familiar with evidence on the Klaus Fuchs case which FJBJ. Director J, Edgar Hoover has been plac- ing before Congress. Hoover, seeking enough, funds for at least 300 more G-men, was said to have told a Senate appropriations subcommittee there are -------------------------------------------communists and fellow travelers in this country, of them card- Girl Acquitted In Slaying of Stricken Father carrying party members. He also is understood to have said that Fuchs, the British, scien- tist aow under arrest In London for passing atomic secrets to Russia, Private Aid Proposed After Marshall Plan Europe Boasts of Making Good Use Of American Dollars By Joseph E. Paris Western Europe wants private American investors to take up where U. S. govern- ment aid tapers off toward the end of the Marshall plan In 1952. In a survey of the progress of the Marshall plan at the half-way mark, the European member areas yesterday discussed their needs for the final two years of the aid program. Private invest- ment is needed to keep their eco- nomies stable after TJ. S. stops, the report said. The report estimates these coun- tries will need from 000 to during the fin- al two-year period to carry out their plans. This compares with already given by the U. S. for the first two years of the plan. Robert Marjolin, secretary-gen- eral of the organization for Eu- had many opportunities to carry j ropean Economic Co operation, out his operations here. a news conference yester- Ftichs comes up for trial Friday, jd flrst two s of the charged with two violations of the p-ian had proved ..unre. official secrets act. Officials here say these involve two specific leaks of atomic Information to here In 1945 and the other In Bri- tain In 1947. The German-born, 38-year-old scientist came to this country in 1943 as a member of a top British atomic team. He remained in the United States until 1946. Senator Ferguson (B.-Mich.) dis- closed last night that he is asking Attorney General McGrath to try to extradite Fuchs from Britain for trial before an American court. He said such procedure would provide- the "best deterrent" to atomic espionage in the United States. Two Indiana Republicans said the Truman administration must bear a large share of the responsi- bility if there are as many com- munists in the country as Hoover reportedly said. K. U. M. W- President John L. Lewis, left, Union Secretary-Treasurer John Owens, center, and Welly Hopkins, U, M. W. counsel, confer at the hearing table in Washington today as they face presidential fact-finders seeking an analysis of the soft coal CA.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) Aid Well Used He asserted that Europe can pridefully say It has made good! use of American aid so far, withl Persons were Injured, one senous- Five Injured In Explosion At Eau Claire Eau Claire, Wis. Five w wv Miners, Operators To Renew Coal Talks Truman's coal fact-finding board today won agreement from John L. Lewis and the coal operators to try again for agreement on a coal contract through negotiations. The new bargaining sessions were set for this afternoon with tne board members sitting In as Ob- the exception of Greece and west- ern Germany which have needed extra sums to keep them going, Marjolin predicted that Western Europe will be paying for three- fourths of its American Imports with Its own exports and services by 1952. He said, however, that they may have to cut down on planned 1m-, ports from the TJnlted States in or- close the dollar gap unless large scale private American In- vestments are made to cover the predicted 25 per cent deficit be- tween imports and exports. The gap is expected to amount to over In 1952. The survey, compiled by a com- Carol Ann Paight Bridgeport, Conn. Carol Ann Paight, acquitted In the mer- cy slaying of her cancer-doomed -ther. ntoday power balance. This new self-con- fidence Is already being reflected, moreover, in certain actions which have received far too little atten tion In the American press. Of these actions, the most Im- portant to date is the extraordin- ary Soviet recognition of the com- to college as soon as she rests up from the ordeal of her trial. be needed for the fiscal year 1950- cellar and were standing what many of us under the chairmanship of It just proves what many 01us Brftl h Economist Eric Roll es. have been saying for a long th t h t t, nno nnn nnft_ that the Fair Deal party has been sympathetic to communists and fel- low said senator Cape- hart. Senator Jenner put it this way: "The figures don't surprise me in view of the way some people In the administration have been go- ing all out for men like Alger Hiss. The 21-year-old blonde, who The communists and their sym- pleaded temporary insanity, was freed last night by a Jury of 12 parents. She spent her first night at home in nearby Stamford since ly, Tuesday night when a ious explosion set fire to the Horswill home. Gladys Horswill, 19, was members were optl- the Whole coal dispute might be settled before nightfall. In] David Cole, chairman of the board, two or three hours." Lewis said it was "possible." The operators indicated they, were less optimistic. Tlie board's proposal came after er treatment. Horswill said he came home around 6 o'clock and found Alice unconscious near the cellar steps. He said he smelled gas as he re- vived her and. then summoned po- lice. His house does not use gas, he said. Anderson and Wold were sent serious condition at a hospitalihad remarked that he believed an where she was being treated for agreement might be reached In burns. Her father, Neil, and a sister, Alice, 17, suffered minor burns and were hospitalized. Two policemen, Gerald Armind- son and Harris Wold, suffered burns also but were released aft- a somewhat stormy hour and a half of hearings during which. Lewis once Two Men Rob Phoenix Bank Acheson Cites Futile Efforts For Arms Checks No New Overtures To Moscow Planned On Atomic Weapons Washington Secretary of State Acheson today ruled out any new overtures to Russia on inter- national control of atomic wea- pons, including the hydrogen super- bomb. Acheson also said the United States should avoid what he called self reproach in connection with atomic weapons. He said this might paralyze American action Ln developing a strong American policy. The secretary's remarks were made in a news conference dis- cussion of U. S. policy. He told newsmen that if this country can reach its goal of world peace by the process of agreement ;hat will be the best way to do it. he added, "four years of trying have brought us to the rea- lization that Is not possible." Acheson spoke directly in com- menting on recent Senate speeches jy Chairman McMahon (D.-Conn.) of the congressional Atomic Energy commission and Chairman Tydings (D.-Md.) of the Senate armed serv- ices committee. McMahon proposed a five-year, American crusade for peace, including International control of atomic energy. Tydings urged that President Truman call a. world conference for disarma- ment. Concerning these proposals. Ache- son said the way to move toward the goal of world peace Is to de- velop areas of strength In the world. He said this takes a calm, steady, persistent American foreign jollcy. This is more important now :han ever before, Acheson said. called Coal Man George H. Love "a liar by the clock." Phoenix, men, at [least one of them armed, early to- Cole asked whether LOTOS roDbed the Bank of Douglas in had presented any specific contract demands to the mine operators. Love said he was Informed by Cy- rus S. Ching (federal mediation chief) that "It was the union bar- timates tnat aoout :L_----- that 'You not including military aid will to the house. They examined the gaining technique to say that You v. fZ- icKn. cellar and were standing in the men own the mines, l nave me 51. This shows a considerable drop from, expenditures In 1949 50, which amounted to plus about in special assistance for western Germany. These estimates are to be stud- pathizers are being aided and abet- led in Congress before the appro- S nwr, JLprnment." Ipriations debate starts February she shot her father, Police Ser- geant Carl Paight, last September as he slept in Stamford hospital. sne toke' down Paris nas the verdict. She was near com- David British recognition of Bao Dal is termed the verdict just and pvnprtpd jfair, but added. recoguufone oi Ho Chi- "This Is no precedent for a mer- he time of the the Chinese communists iwhojwas insane at the have also recognized just as shooting. the Greek guerrillas were support- States ed by the Bulgnrs and the Alban-jdeclined to see fans Furthermore, the word that he had ted by our own government, Snow, Slush Make Highway Travel Tough By The Associated Press Snow and rain, with temperatures around the freezing mark moved 'into Minnesota last night and con- 21. (In Washington some senators said today the outcome of the British national elections Febru-ining from the house, driven by arv 23 will influence strongly the! flames. amount of money Congress will! Mrs. Horswill arrived home as State's Attorney Lorin W. Willlsltinued at some points today. He sent! The southern two-thirds of the kitchen speaking to Gladys when men in the palm of my the explosion occurred. The threejwhat do you were blown out of the house Lewis Cries through a kitchen door which was Lewis jumped up and leveled off blasted off its hlcges. at Love across the table: Amundsen's clothes caught fire) "That's an infamous and deliber- but he extinguished them by roll-late lie. I said we represented the ing in the snow. Gladys' garmentsjmen. I say to you George Love, also were set afire. Wolf sufferedjyou're a liar by the clock, hand burns in helping to extln- guish them. The father and Alice came nin- approve for the rest of the Mar- shall plan. Republican Senator Smith of New Jersey said that aj victory for Winston ChurchillV Conservatives would "make it much easier" to get congressional approval of the amount needed. He said some senators have no con- fidence In the economic policies of the present Labor government.) Will Cot Imports The report said the total already poured into the plan has removed the immediate threat of "bankruptcy and dissolu- motion, with the political or snow and slush that made high- which threats traffic. heavy, wet snow slewing ments to Bar- Dai. In short, even measure this side of open, invasion of French Indo-Chlna. is: now being taken by the Kremlin.; Commenting on the report, Mar- jolin said "The necessary adjust- ments after the end of the Mar- Cole tried to interrupt. Love pro- tested: "I don't want to go into personalities. Mr. Cole." "Why Lewis shouted. "Why Cole restored calm and the hear- ings went on. The current fact-finding panel has orders to report to President Truman by Monday, to clear the way for a Taft-Hartley act injunc- tion intended to force the miners back to the pits for 80 days. Coal Shortages j As the board swung into the strike of Ur.ited Mine workers was being felt at points 'all over the nation. The CJ.O. United Steelworkers Pittsburgh, office today sent a 000 check to the United Mine workers "to assist the needy miners Miller, 23, must await a grand their families In their struggle the fire department came on the scene. Hutchinson Slaying Suspect Awaiting Grand Jury Inquiry "Hntchinson, Minn. Laura downtown Phoenix of cash. City police said the men caught the janitor outside the bank about 6 a. m., forced him to let them into the building and waited until Jim Wise, a bank employe, arrived about a. m. Wise was forced to open the safe. The robbers then locked the em- ployes In a room and left. Boston Robbery Suspects Nabbed With men and ft young woman carrying in a paper sack were arrested by De- itroit police today. I Detectives immediately began Bank officials estimated the them about the escaped with In bills of 000 holdup of Brink's, Inc., in Bos- The five were arrested at a m for what police had intended to be routine questioning. They re- fused to talk, except to say they inquiry into the shooting death of Gordon Jones, a. Hutchinson attor- ney, Judge W. O. McNelly ruled in municipal court here late yesterday. against the coal operators.' THERE charged with second sin-rim? Southeastern private American to prison for life1 the northeast to have snow. could have con- J- at shal plan will require a decrease) Jurors wm convened next Tues- in Europe's imports from valentine's day. Miss Miller, econd Continuation of those conditions ca, at least in some Minneapolis stenographer, is held iout'sjwas predicted by the Weather bu-j But he added that "if there bond on a first degree tavest- I murder complaint signed by Frank vp-irc in orison v. in American am wumu there. Broderius told tne court. his office is preparing for early 1s- Lieht applause swept the court-''St'- Cloud- ea? ?ad a? mch Europe to make adjustments Judge McNelly turned down a suance a statement of policy in room at the verdict despite Super- imolsture in Ol which would lower the imports motion for dismissal of the charge, connection with the current coal I ior Judge John A Cornell's stem! was recprtteo. America. jmade by Don E. Morgan, Minne-shortage. om.iTict inv .m _. _. _ Paul G. Hoffman. EGA admin- anolis. attorney for Miss Miller. He said the situation in Minne- to jten years" most Icould be maintained at their pre- -WE overtly Moscovite and the Increasing arrogance of; the kremlin in its dealings uh: the Western But just as Hitler's second phase.tion. i0f 15. had one main theme, which was Spectators thronged the corn- Alexandria Bemidji Austria so the kremlin's of the Fairfield county court- had phase 'will so have one rnainjhouse for more than 30 minutes to'forn theme which will be the Far East, shout "Good luck, Carol" as ram 5UOW lusa 1Bil m H Indo-Chlna alone can be left for home. the Twin Cities, where a low of 31 concerning Europes ability tured the rest of Asia will be rath-i Judge Cornell set her free with- was registered. on its own feet when er rapidly consumed in the ensu-jin seconds after the verdict from cloudy weather combined with Marshall aid is nnisnea. ing chain reaction. Great nine women and three menjthe snow, rain and sleet to force are promised nt small cost. As! on the jury. iby-passing the Twin Cities by in the case of the nazi invasion1 The jury members refused to INorthwest Airlines planes on trans- of Austria the risk of how many ballots they trips. Some flights, firm coun'termeasures is exactly: carol testified she could not re-jnowever, originated In the Twin proportioned to the degree of pro-'member shooting her 52-year-old cress of rearmament. [father as he lay in a drug-induced Furthermore, in the after an operation that re- fice here last week. Miss Miller was beside his body and admitted owner- ship of a .38 caliber revolver found told the court. G. Hoffman. EGA admin- apoiis, attorney for who is in Washington af- Morgan said the state had failed to that MJSs jj-jjgj. the per_ son probably guilty of the shooting. corff i_ at OEEC I Paris, said the survey Is fell cancer. He vaster panorama now his Incurable car us where the Far East has knew he had the disease. tria's old place. Western Europe1, The girl, perspiring beneath has the .former position of Czecho- photographic lights after the ver- slovakia The scene of action will diet, told newsmen she would re- aeain shift westwards, whenever turn to New England collage at old Donald Morgan died at Vic- the Soviet margin of strength has' Henniker, N. H., as soon as hospital Tuesday of injuries hpcn suitably widened. The ex- rested. D Tjjg youthi son of MJ. and Mrs_ James Morgan, was sliding down hill on county trunk M on a noon. The sled struck the side of an automobile driven by George Nuendorf, of Medford. perts put this date some time be- tween 1952 v.-hen the kremlin tween 1952 Mrs. Mary Paight, 52, widowed by her daughter's bullet, sobbed Sled Crash Injuries Fatal to Boy, 7 Stanley, Wis. Seven-year- have laid by a respectable stock- at the verdict. Then she said: "ITUia hill on c piie of atomic bombs, and happy I could die." She stood sled Monday when all Soviet armament behind the girl through- "IJ- now culminate. I out the trial. Sister Kenny Travel Permit Bill Pushed Washington The House passed and sent to President Tru- man yesterday a bill that would give Sister Elizabeth Kenny the unprecedented privilege of entering and leaving this country at will, without the usual passport or im- migration papers. A member of the House judiciary committee staff described the bill as the broadest in its individual ap- plication of any immigration meas- ure ever passed by Congress. various denominations. Police had only vague descrip- tions of the men. One was about 32-35 years old, the other, a, Mexi- can, 25-30 years old. Police said It was not known how the men left the scene but were believed to have had a car. Phone Company Ready to Discuss Terms With Union New telephone work- ers national attorney predicted to- coai operas settlement will be reached William Green president of the, nation-wide telephone any court injunction issued under j the Taft-Hartley law to end the mine strike. State Coal Supply Study Pressed St. Paul James W. Clark, state fuel conservator, said today his office is preparing for early 1s- The prediction was made by Henry Mayer, New York, attorney for the employes of Western Elec- tric Co., a Bell system subsidiary. Yesterday. Eugene J. McNeeley, Northwestern Bell Telephone Com- pany president, in answer to a tele- gram from Cyrus S. Chlng. director of the Federal Mediation service, pledged his company's co-operation in trying to reach a prompt agree- itnent with the union. In a return telegram. McNeeley sota is no worse than in other parts told Ching he would advise him on of the country and is better than InJFebruary 20 of the status of nego some areas. Itiations. Narcotics Seized New York cache of nar- cotics worth was seized last night part of it in a tele- phone booth in the Hotel McAlpin where it allegedly had been left for a customer by peddlers. The seizure and two arrests were revealed early today by po- lice and federal agents. The prisoners were linked with a dope ring that has been trailed since last November, police said. They were as Isidore Halitzer, 31, and Philip Shear, 31, both of Brooklyn. The two men were arrested aft- er parking their automobile off Herald street and the hotel. ;ot the money "from gambling." Rochester Check Passers Sentenced Rochester, Minn. Two St. Paul men were sentenced to inde- prison terms yesterday when they pleaded guilty in district to' second degree forgery charges. They are Donald E. Carey, 27, and George J. Evans, 23. They were accused of passing a forged check n a downtown Rochester store last December 13. Webster to Head Defense Research After the arrests, police with possessing narcotics. 33 and one-third ounces of purej Narcotics agents estimated the, heroin were found in the car, 13JH4 ounces of pure heroin couldlmorrow at William Web- ster of Boston, was named today by President Truman to be chairman of the research and development board In the defense establishment. Webster is executive vice presi- dent of the New England electric system. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and vicinity: Clearing and somewhat colder tonight, pre- ceded by some very light snow early tonight. Thursday generally fair. Low tonight 26; high Thurs- day afternoon 30. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 36; minimum, 28; noon 34; precipitation, trace; sun sets tonight at sun rises to- ounces in a package in the phone booth, one ounce on Shear's person, and 66 and two thirds ounces in a Brooklyn apartment. Police said Halitzer telephoned a customer and told him a pack- age would be left for him in the telephone booth. It was Halitzer's practice, police added, to wait nearby until he saw a customer pick up a package. Police, who found pairs of nylon stockings in the rear seat of the car, said the two prisoners used hosiery in cartons as a cov- er-up for delivery of narcotics. Halitzer and Shear were charg- been diluted and made into nearly capsules to sell at each at the underground price. Halitzer and Shear were report- ed by police to be associates of Alfred San Antonio and Paul Graci, who were arrested at La Guardia Field January 31 as they allegedly prepared to fly to Nash- ville, Term, with narcotics valued at TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE Max. Min. Free. Duluth 30 25 .34 Mpls.-St. Paul 34 31 .14 Rochester .......33 St. Cloud ........32 Abilene 82 Chicago Denver Des Moines Kansas City Los Angeles I Miami 58 35 52 63 Henry Halitzer, a brother of the New York........41. prisoner, is serving ten years in Sing Sing prison on a narcotics conviction, police said. 46 48 Winnipeg .......32 Seattle Washington 25 31 31 15 53 39 30 33 40 42 63 12 36 24 15 .08 .15 .44 .04   

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