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Winona Republican Herald: Wednesday, January 25, 1950 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - January 25, 1950, Winona, Minnesota                              SNOW ENDING TONIGHT, COLDER FIGHT POLIO WITH THE MARCH OF DIMES VOLUME 49, NO. 288 WINONA, MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 25, 1930 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES G. O. P. Fears Funds More Than Votes By Joseph and Stewart Alsop Washington The spectacle Of the plight of the Republicans roust contribute considerably to Presi- dent Truman's present happy mood. All the signs of the con. gressional session in fact suggest that the Republican party is going into the crucial 1950 election more, not less divided, more, not less uncertain, more, not less defen- sive-minded. The real significance of the re- cent vote on the House rules, for example, lay In its revelation of an almost unprecedented split in Republican ranks. Nothing could be more unimaginative or less ap- pealing than the leadership of the] House Republicans by the Martin- Brown Halleck Allen Junta. Hitherto, however, Representative Joseph W. Martin and his lieuten- ants have always been able to keep almost all their cohorts strict- ly in line. Last -week, they joined the southern Democrats in the attempt to restore the former powers of the Hous-; rules committee. As very frankly declared on the their purpose was to spare mem-j bers the political temptation to vote for welfare legislation. A re- volt against them was immediate- ly organized. The fair employment practices act was used by the ad- ministration as a sort of club to break the power of the Republican leadership. Sixty odd Republican members, fearful of the Negro vot- ers In their districts, took their stand with the northern Demo- crats. The plan of the southerners and Republican conservatives was quickly smashed. THIS WAS, ESSENTIALLY, a public declaration by this large Hiss Gets 5 Years for Perjury Minneapolis Gob Has Plan to Free Mighty Missouri Fringe of Blizzard Sweeps Winona Minneapolis Dallas Scheldler, a former sailor, thinks the U. S. S. Missouri could be freed from the Ches- apeake Bay mud flat by em- ploying a method he said be saw used with success in the Pacific during World War n. Scheidler suggests that the Navy sink. pipes at an angle down the battleship's sides and then fill those pipes with air or steam under pressure so that bubbles form in the muck. As the bubbles burst, he claims, the released pressure will loosen the mud and it will be borne away on the current. Scheidler, who served as a gunner's mate on a minesweep- er, said he saw four freed that way, Including one laden with concrete and strand- ed on a volcanic Island. "Be sure to tell 'em enlisted men thought up this the former sailor concluded. Siorm Fades After Hitting North Dakota 62 Degree Heat Wave Recorded At Milwaukee Chrysler Plant Workers Strike In Pension Row Detroit (Jft group" of 'once-obedient House Re- marched out on strike at 10 a.m.j publicans that they had given up (E.S.T.) today after six months A terrific blizzard roared (through Minnesota and Wisconsin] today, but Winona and area were1 well out of Its path. iinow was falling rapidly and it windy up to 25 miles an hour in the country but this weather was merely the fringe of the big blizzard that rocked the Dakotas yesterday. The Weather bureau forecast that moderately light to heavy snowfall would continue most of the day, ending In flurries tonight. The winds will also diminish. Tile night's low is expected to be zero to five below. Highways are "rough and slip- pery but the manager i Ol one trucking firm reported at TrDT noon. Visibility was poor, however, hope of winning by sticking to Re- publican orthodoxy. On any issue with strong popular appeal, the President will have the same pow- er to make the Republicans break ranks. On the other hand, the power of Republican orthodoxy is still suf- ficient to paralyze the party and prevent it from taking a construc- tive line of Its own. In the House, the Representatives who voted of futile negotiations over a pen- sion plan. The C.I.O. United Auto Workers ordered its Chrysler Corpor- ation members to "hit the bricks" Immediately after negotiations broke off at a.m. U.A.W. President Walter Reuther said the strike was called because the company would not agree to grant a package of benefits worth ten cents hourly per worker. back borne, who have been stirred up to telephone protests against "me-too-ism." In the Senate, although no single action could so upset the Truman atratepry as passing the F.E.P.C., the Republican leadership will probably not be able to muster enough votes for closture, and this is because the business contri- butors dislike the F.E.P.C. almost ing Chrysler, DeSoto, Dodge and Plymouth cars. Although Chrysler had offered a pension plan, the pat- tern this year in heavy industry, the union objected to the terms. The company insisted that it be permitted to operate the plan on a pay-as-you-go basis. The U.A.W. demanded that a jointly adminls- Team Snowbound Turtle Lake, N. D. OT "When are the snowplows com- what 15 snowbound members of the McClnsky High school basketball team and their drivers asked as they spent a second night at the Vaujnn Hanson farm home near here. "It was a vacation for them at said Coach Carl Elston, "but now most of them are ready to go home." The team was trapped by the Dlizzard Monday trying to reach Harvey, for a pretouma- znent game. Elston said they have been "living like kings" but the Han- son larder is beginning to run a little low. Republican-Herald photos The man on the left in the picture on the left Is no stranger to Winona. He Is Karl Nuerenberg, chief investigator for the state public examiner's office and former federal prohibition agent who led many big raids in Winona and area during the waning days of the nation's dry era. He was the state's principal witness In the trial of August Gensmer, Jr., Winona county commissioner charged with soliciting and offering to accept a bribe for his vote in connection with the purchase of highway equipment. Nuerenberg is shown here conferring with State Public Examiner Richard A, Golling who is In Winona with many members of his staff lor the Gensmer trial. In the picture at the right Commissioner Gensmer is shown sitting In a chair in the district courtroom. When Nuerenberg was questioned under cross examination Tuesday, all referencei to his career as a prohibition agent was held Improper and kept out of the record of the trial by Judge Vernon Gates of Rochester who is presiding. 999 Gensmer Case to Go To Jury Late Today By Gordon Holte Closing arguments were in progress after lunch today, and the nsmer bribery case was expected to be delivered to the Jury of five Mine Strike Public Peril, Boyd Claims The head of the Bureau of Mines said today that unless coal production. Is increased the national health and welfare asking for and agreeing to accept a bribe in connection with certain Gensmer bribery case was expected men and seven women by late afternoon. When court reconvened at noon, It marked the final phase of the three-day trial of August H. Gensmer, Jr., 48, of Bethany, on a charge tered 'trust fund be set up with'because of the blowing snow. set Trapper Survives 17-Day Ordeal The snow was falling on a slippery undercoating deposited by rain vpsterdav about two inches as much as the southerners, company putting In a Men like Senators Ives of New amount for each hour worked. YorX and Lodge of Massachusetts are working overtime to persuade all their colleagues to help break the expected southern filibuster. Several Senators, like Taft of Ohio and Hlckenlooper of Iowa, will! vote for cloture while opposing the] bill itself. Yet it is generally ex-j pectcd that cloture will not be vot-j Rupert. B. C by 2 p. n, th hi me on the a trapper who drifted cood o e days in a 38-foot, trawler and MldwBSt BattlCS :walked through zero .r. 11 for nine more was disclosed L.OIQ :day by British Columbia provin-j icia'l police. ..j By The Associated Press Their report said Trapperj A blizzard which swept across county board transactions The defense rested at a. m. today, with Defense Attorney H. M. Lamberton still objecting to the in- troduction as evidence in the case lution asking President Truman recorded conversation in which i invoke the Taft-Hartley law to re- the third district commissioner is] ]now or soon will be imperiled." Director James Boyd made the statement to the Senate labor com- which is considering a reso- of uenwon store full coal production aneged to have "frankly admitted" the temperature was eight above, The law the President that he entered into an agreement u 1. 1. recelve a bribe from a Minne- which was lower than a court order ending a strike .-KJ t7 r tViToa r-jari c Low for the night was ten above. The center of the blizzard was over northern Wisconsin this morn- ing, well out of way, the weather- man said. Pour inches of snow had the Republican leaders to be seen to be believed. YET THEY CANNOT cscape: from their dtlemmn: it confronts. when the work stoppage threatens the national welfare. apolis road equipment salesman. The half-hour pur- Boyd's testimony was the first portedly a conversation between indication by a key federal official Gensmer and Karl Nuerenberg of that the government feels the state public examiner's office uation is becoming serious on Jast August the national basis. Judge Criticizes Jury for Deadlock New York Bronx County time the state has ever used evidence taken by a recording de- vice In prosecution, Assistant State Attorney General Charles Houston said yesterday, The record was admitted as evi- dence by Judge Vernon Gates of Big Cleveland Robbery Foiled Brink's Exchange Marked for Raid No Fine Levied; Circuit Court Appeal Filed Chambers' Story Of Secret Papers Upheld by Verdict New York Alger Hiss was sentenced today to five years in a federal penitentiary. Sentence was pronounced by Federal Judge Henry W. Goddard in the courtroom where Hiss was convicted on two perjury counts last Saturday by a jury of eight women and four men. He was not fined. The former State department of- ficial had denied slipping secret stale papers to a prewar Soviet spv ring. After sentence was pronounced defense counsel filed a notice oT appeal with the clerk of the court and submitted a defense motion that Hiss be continued in bail pend- ing decision of the higher court of appeal. Judge Goddard said it would be "fair" to continue Hiss under bail. Bail Judge Goddard set bail at 000 pending appeal after the gov- ernment prosecutor asked The five year term was imposed on each of two counts, the terms to run concurrently. Maximum sen- tence could have been five years Imprisonment on each count and fine on each count. The jury held that Hiss lied when he denied passing secret state department documents to Whittaker Chambers, self-styled courier for communist spy ring and lied again when he denied seeing Chamber! after January 1, 1937. Judge Goddard denied a defense request that the 45-year-old Hiss not be imprisoned saying: "This should be a warning that a crime of this character may not be impunity." The government had recom- mended that Hiss be sentenced to a i, XT T m A f've years On each count, to run Hackensack, N. J. M The government young state legislator upset o{ the case) Assistant U. S. election forecasts yesterday Thomas F. Murphy, did won the Republican nomination for Widnall Wins New Jersey Nomination not recommend a fine. imprisoned J. Parnell Thomas' va- cated congressional post. Supreme Court Prospect The next step for appeal beyond the circuit court would be to the William B. Widnall, States Supreme court, attorney and state it go to the highest trlbun- eked out an unofficial 299-vote vic-lal, at least three justices are ex- tory over Harry C. Harper, one-jpected to disqualify themselves, time big league baseball pitcher. I They are Felix Frankfurter, Harper, who now is state labor Stanley Reed and Tom C. Clark. commissioner, was backed by the The first two testified as charact- Cleveland G.O.P. organization in the state's er witnesses for Hiss at the first seventh congressional district trial last June. Justice Clark was mary election. He was a heavyiU. S. attorney general while the (favorite over Widnall who worked up its case A gang of menlthe regular Republican organlza-iagainst Hiss. police think plotted a Clevelandjtion had tried to force him out of version of last week's Eoston'the race. A decision to disqualify himself Is up to each justice. He is not Brink's robbery was at large to- Ironically, Harper also lost a Re- compelled by law. However, a Just- day, publican congressional prlmaryjlce customarily steps down in a Detective Thomas Whalen of theitwo years ago when he was when he feels that either side Cleveland robbery squad said thejthe position of bucking the partyjmight be aggrieved by his consid- seven men "definitely" had beenj organization as Widnall planning to loot the Brink's, Inc., time. headquarters rival the Widnall will be opposed by Dem them everywhere. At the moment. George Anderson, Ketchikan, Alas--the northern hard- Samuel Joseph told rnem-'Rocnester over tne strenuous holdup at Boston. ocrat George T. English in the in.mrif-n Rpniiblicdn National kn, is in Rood condition at, Masset.jest in North Dakota faded to-u Sections of Lamberton. i Detectives, tinned bv an Inform-lFebruarv 6 snecial election. Ene- did thisiering it. Hiss Thanks Judge Just before Hiss was sentenced for instnnre. Republican National kn, is in good condition at, Masset, jest in Chairman Guy George Gabrlelson B. C.. where he was found by po- is busily working on his fainousjlice who saw his signal fire. statement of Republican princi-j Anderson told them his trawler pies, which is frankly intended disabled January 8 nearj make the fat cats loosen up. The; the south end of the Portland winds, _ blocked Gabrlelson draftincr group has al- drifting for eight days before of North ready roughed out n statement it was beached on Graham roads. Hundreds of motorists that'would cause every Ameri-j told stranded. Scores of schools can voter with less than piston" closed' a year to support, the Democratsjfr0m boat and marie hls way plunged to far below zero as in every election for another to the poin. wnere a'e (Continued on Pane jbers of a deadlocked jury yester- day but there was lots of sting and, less intelli-1 snap in a fresh blast of cold than two.year.old jectlons of Lamberton. Objects to Recording Gensmer's attorney today reiter- Huee snowdrifts whiooed The Jury had failed to reacl1 his objection to admission of Huge snowaruts, wmppea (n trial nf an iverdict In the trial of an ithe recording on the grounds that 7000 Peddler, Leonard did not represent the total con- 37. iversation between Gensmer and The evidence included a filrnjNuereriberg and alleged that prom- showing an alleged narcotics sale. ises had been made to Gensmer to "What did you 'hint those induce him to make the statements. ade. The parallel House and Senate drafting groups are meanwhile wrangling about the best way toj please the contributors without j alienating all the rest of the elec-j torate. It is already clear that adoption of a highly conservative statement, such as mipht help Ga-: brielson in his t.isk of monoy-rais-j ing. will cause Lodge and Ives.i Morse of Oregon. Aiken of Ver-j mont and the others like them toj leave the reservation. The choice., in short, is between an open split nnd savins; nothing- Al! this ss very nice for Presi- dent Truinan. The trouble is that the same situation which gives thel President such wonderful political! openings in domestic politics! works in reverse in the sphere of: foreign nnd defense policy. Thls: was shown by the peevish, frivol-1 ously irresponsible House vote on I the Korean aid bill. The right-wing! Republican and southern Demo-' crats. infuriated by the injection: of civil rights into the rules com-j r.iittee issue, tried to pet their own! back by taking n hack at foreign] spending. It was an instinctive, un-l reasoning reaction, i This same reaction is strong.] moreover, in the Senate, where the: risht wing Republican ar.d south-! ern Democratic members of thei all powerful appropriations com- mittee are joined in a soualid lit-i tie plot to destroy the European recovery program. Altogether, the] Republican aim seems to be toj make the worst of both worlds, j No doubt this will continue to be the case while so many eminent Republicans fear contributors more than voters. Detectives, tipped by an inform-February 6 special election. Eng- er, smashed Into apartments a former mayor of East Pat- Cross asked Judge Goddard for permission for Hiss to make a statement, the east side last night in search'erson, N. J., was the only Demo-i Hiss, ashen-faced, rose from his beside his wife Friscilla, and iwalksd slowly to within a few feet of a former member of Detroit's cratic candidate In notorious "Purple gang." Instead primary. they found seven copies of Cleve-: Unofficial complete returns fronrof the bar, accompanied by two land Brink's uniforms, friction seventh district's 230 election'marshals. and burglary tools. precincts gave Widnall votes The search which turned up the to for Harper. In a clear voice he declared: I would like to thank your honor finally was picked up. BLIZZARD whom he described as person" victimized by a -gullible state offi- Bill to Admit More DP's Gains Ground WEATHER mation that Sam Norbert, prison for padding his office! "I am confident that in the fu- introduce a "confession" rather than Detroit, was in Cleveland. Detroitipayroll and accepting kickbacks. sture all the facts will be brought a simple statement of fact and police have been seeking NorbertJThomas, who pleaded no contestto'out to show how Whittaker Cham- that no proper foundation had the robbery of a restau-'the charges, now is in the federalbers was able to carry out for- laid for the introduction of operator there and have Is-'correctional Institution at Dan-gery by typewriter." transcript of the record made on ajslled a warrant for his arrest. [bury, Conn, device known as a The half-hour reading of the transcript was the last major piece' of evidence to be Introduced byj County Attorney W. Kenneth Nis-j sen and are associ-j ated in the prosecution of the before they rested their case late I yesterday afternoon. j I A short time later, Lamberton I opened his defense of Gensmer By Joseph Goodwin Washington (ff) The hope of additional thousands of displaced FEDERAL FORECAST Winona and light to heavy snowfall this after- noon, ending in fjurrles tonight, diminishing winds. Low tonight zero to five below. LOCAL WEATHER Official observation for the 24 hours ending at 12 today: cials who "put words in his mouth." i Europeans for getting into America came one step nearer to realization 3- precipitation. .20 (two inches of Returns to Stand sun sets tonight at Gensmer was on the stand when) A bill to permit orphans and rises tomorrow at court recessed yesterday afternoon! enter this country by June 30, 1951, was approved last night i TEMPERATURES ELSEWHERE land returned to testify further the Senate judiciary committee. It is expected to be introduced toj Max. Min. Pre. morning when the session was re-jthe Senate promptly. 19 sumed at 9 a, m. The total approved by the com-ordered the committee to report'Bemidjl 35 The Bethany man flatly denied miltee the approximately "f bill CommiUee apprwal Duluth 23 ever having sought to solicit who already have reached! was hv a vote of 10 to 3 U bribe, frorc any salesman during his i the united States under the 1948; specific provisions would beiMpls.-St. Paul 25 DP law. imade within the authorized 33 That law authorizes the entry of i for visas to be issued to: Cloud -2 persons in the two-year [Greeks displaced in the Greek civ-jWiJImar 25 period ending June 30, 1950. A bmlil war, Poles who ..........83 the House would of the Polish armed Chicago 63 crease the number to on the side of the Allies Denver 54 edged that on certain occasions bribes were offered to him. He stated that when the bribes Alger Hiss, left, former State department official, is accompanied by his wife, Priscilla, and an unidentified man as he arrives at the federal courthouse in New York city today for sentencing. Federal Judge Henry W. Goddard imposed a sentence of five years in a federal Wire- photo to The Republican-Herald.) the recorded conversation Gensmer is alleged to ihave had with Nuerenberg began afternoon whea.Nueren- berg made his first appearance on the witness stand. He brought with him the ma- chine on which the conversation is alleged to have been recorded, ex- (Continned on Pace 10, Column LJ GENSMEB extend the date by one year. Iduring World War n, and Moines ......40 The Senate committee's action European refugees in Shanghai. ;Kansas City .....75 was announced by Chairman Mc- The bill specificaUy bars Angeles the eve of the date the Senate had against Jews and Catholics. 59 76 80 iNew York........44 President Truman called for 26 "liberalization" of the DP law 71 summer to eliminate what he call-1 Washington 73 ed discriminatory p r o vi s I ons Edmonton.......-29 Carran who termed the munists, Marxists and measure "generally bore arms against the Orleans The chairman previously had been! States in the last war. thoroughly dissatisfied with other proposed bills for admitting addi- tional DP's. The agreement was reached on Winnipeg 2 -17 -29 0 -25 -3 4 -12 -12 63 40 14 11 18 37 72 69 36 7 43 54 -42 -26 .20 .24 .45 .29 .03 .30 .16 .07 .32 .03 .35 .01 .30   

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