Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: December 30, 1949 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - December 30, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              WARMER TONIGHT, SATURDAY MILD VOLUME 49, NO. 267 WATCH THIS PAPER FOR FAN FARE WINONA, MINNESOTA, FRIDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 30, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES TODAY- President May Ask Tax Hike By Joseph and Stewart AIsop Harry S. Judge Warned on Guilty Plea LIE RENEWS EAST-WEST PEACE PLEA Truman's sound money instincts! have now apparently overbalanced the advice of his own lieutenants. Most of his advisers have shown little enthusiasm for such a move. Yet Truman can now be expect- ed, barring a last-minute change of mind, to ask for considerable tax increases in his forthcoming message to Congress. The decision to do so is a pure- ly personal one on the part oi the President, and it casts an inter- esting reflection on his mental pro- cesses. The fact is, according to By Francis w. Carpenter those who have worked closely Lake Success _upt_ Trygve with him. that Truman has a quite _ genuine horror of "living beyond jLle' worned by the continual one's income." He is as worried East-West squabbles in the United Suggests Talks Be Resumed In U.N. Chambers by the prospect of continued fed- eral deficits as Senator Harry S. Byrd or the other congressional conservatives. But he blames the coriservatives, and with some rea- son, for the present plight of the Nations says the time has come for the two camps in the U. N. to resume real step by step nego- tiation for a settlement. The U. N. secretary general] .made known his ideas on the con- .ederal budget. fllct in a year-end statement pub- A special favorite in Truman's jijshed last night in the United Na- long list of favorite complaints Bulletin, a publication put that there would be hardly any twice each month by the U, ficit this year if the RepublicanjN. department of public informa- 80th Congress had not passed "rich man's tax bill" over hisj- Lie was elected to his veto. A demand for higher taxes ja-year position in the early days thus both present the the U. N. and in a moment of dent with an opportunity to airjrare agreement between.the Rus- thls favorite complaint as publicly jsians and the West. Since that as possible, and will at the same [time he has seen tense situations time soothe his deficit but he said in his statement conscience. ithat he believes the U. N. has turned in a constructive record TRUMAN'S PRESENT intention is to concentrate his tax demand on corporation profits. Business profits after taxes have risen from a record in 1946 to over Truman can thus argue, and has argued, that this hardly proves that business is being strangled by high taxes. Thus although some of his advis- ers oppose the tax demand on the grounds of its effect on the domes- tic economy, Truman is not likely to be dissuaded on these grounds. The official administration line is that a final decision on taxes will only be taken after the full cabinet has been formally consult- ed. In fact, consultation with, the cabinet has become more or less a farce ever since Truman went ahead with his 1948 Fair Deal mes- sage over the violent opposition of virtually his entire cabinet. II Tru- man changes his mind in the end (which is certainly still possible) it in 1949 despite the deadlock, Urges Try for Peace With the turn of the year, Lie brought up once more the Mexi- can resolution approved unani- mously at the Paris meeting of the general assembly in 1948. This calls for the great powers to re- new their efforts to find a settle- ment. "If we have progress during not made much 1949 toward tling or adjusting the basic con- ilict that has delayed peace and hampered the United Nations since the end of the he said. 'We have at least moved .forward ;o a point where the world has a right to hope for a step-by.-step ternal disorder were published by Two Boys Drown Crossing River On Thin Ice Kansas City "John and wrote Mrs, Loren- zo Prather. "got a basketball, football, shirts, airplanes and a BB gun." Waiting for her sons to re- turn for lunch yesterday, she had started a letter on Christ- mas to an older son, George, in New York with the Coast Guard. She continued writing: "I let them go out to Bales lake this morning and they were to be home by noon or no later than 1 o'clock. Here it is after 2. So their guti is going to be hidden. Just then the telephone rang. The caller told Mrs. Prather her sons, John, 14, and Jack, 12, had drowned in the Blue river. Coming home after shooting their BB gun, they tried to cross the river on thin ice. Jack broke through, John tried to rescue him and also broke through. A companion, George Mc- Kinstry, 14, fell in during an attempt to pull both out. He scrambled out on the shore and watched his friends sink out of sight. War Powers Given Governor Of Hong Kong Hony Kong The Hong Kong government today gave the governor of this British crown col- ony virtual war powers to use at his discretion. Emergency regulations that he may invoke to meet attack or in- Asiatic Fleet Policy Stiffened Carrier Boxer And 2 Destroyers Moved to Far East resumption of real negotiation be- tween both sides. the government. They include the right to cen- Lie said that the Mexican res- sorship, requisitioning of proper- olutlon continued to be the wish ty, the barring of strikes and lock of the U. N. "Those who believe that agree- ment and accommodation among will only be because his foreign great powers must be achiev- pollcy advisers have m the years ahead should dedi- him that the net effect of a themselves in 1950 to extend- mand for higher taxes will to mg the area of political under- standing between east and west at every he said. One of the worst problems now facing the U. N. is the issue of China. This bobbed up in the sec- declaration by Soviet Deputy For- eign Minister Jakob A. Malik that the Soviet union does not recog- nize the Nationalist China dele- gate, Dr. T. F. Tsiang, as the representative of the Chinese peo-, pie. crack once and for all the toppling structure of the administration's foreign policy. As things stand, there is not the slightest chance that Congress will act on a demand for higher taxes. But by simply asking for higher taxes, Truman will give the re- surgent isolationists of the Wher- ry-Brlcker stripe a supreme op- portunity. At the same time he will place Senator Arthur Vanden- berg and those who follow him in an impossible position. As one of Vandenberg's admirers put it, the Republicans (and the conservative Democrats as well) will be asked1 to choose between "dollars for for- eigners or higher taxes for Ameri- can business." It is not hard to predict the outcome of such a choice. MOREOVER, the choice will] come at the worst possible mo- ment. Senator Kenneth Wherry and others are for the first time frontally attacking Vandenberg! and all he stands for. And Van- denberg himself is so ill that, he follows the advice of all his on Q ch to d friends, he will leave on a woman sufferer> outs and ordinary police powers that would put the colony on a war footing. The governor may use the pow- ers to meet present labor strife in the colony including a tram strike that many claim is spon- sored by the communists. There was no immediate expla- nation publicly for the publication of the sweeping regulations. But Hong Kong, just off the South Chi- By M. Hightower Washington UPI The United i States was reported today to I shaping a vigorous new backed by a beefed-up Asiatic fleetj block the spread of commun-j ism in the Far East. The Navy said the 45- plane aircraft carrier Boxer andj two destroyers have been dispatch-! ed to strengthen the Seventh task fleet based in the Philippines, j Announcement of this shift ini naval power late yesterday follow- ed a session between President Truman and his top military and diplomatic strategists. Members of the National Security council wouldn't say what went on, but it! is known that planners have pre-! pared a blueprint on Asiatic pol-l icy for Mr. Truman's approval. Ships Warned At the same time, the State de- partment broadcast to U. S. ship- ping lines a warning from the Na- tionalist government of China that the approaches to Shanghai, the Chinese communists' largest port, have been completely blocked by mines. That brought a prompt response] from H. J. Isbrandtsen, president of the Isbrandtsen line. That com- pany, practically the only one op- erating American ships in the area, has run into frequent trouble recently with Nationalist blockade ships. Isbrandtsen said in New York he has wired Secretary of State Acheson asking that a "strong pro- test" be sent to the Nationalist government on, the ground that mine-laying is a "clear of American-Chinese treaties. The Nationalists, led by Gen- eralissimo Chiang Kai-shek, now have their headquarters on the is- land of Formosa, not far from Okinawa. An Early Morning Fire races through a three-story building near the Minneapolis loop today. Four produce firms were burned out. Damage was estimated at (A.P. Wlrephoto to The Republi- can-Herald.) urity council yesterday with aina coast, long has been coveted by the Chinese who leased the is- land to Britain a century ago. Chinese communists are over- running mainland areas contigious Jordan Incorporates Portion of Palestine By Stanley Swinton Cairo, Abdullah has formally Incorporated Jor- dan-occupied Palestine into his kingdom of Hashemite Jordan, the Arab news agency reported today. An Amman dispatch said the Jordanian official gazette on January 1 will publish a royal decree announcing this. President May Turn Rent Rule Over to States Provision for Formosa I The new policy recommenda-j tions, said to have been prepared! for Mr. Truman by the State and Defense departments, reportedly call for an American military mis- sion to Formosa a proposal which was offered separately In an interview by Senator Knowland Besides the provision for a mis- sion to Formosa, the policy blue- print Was said to lay down lines of action around the whole com- munist perimeter in Asia for Mr. to Hong Kong. Some fear has been Truman's consideration. expressed the reds may try to take the island from the British. Manchester Doctor Held for Murder In Mercy Killing Goffstown, N. H. 7P) A prominent Manchester physician was held death-bed slaying of a 59-year- Dr. Hermann N. Sander. 40, father of two young daughters, was vacation a few davs after the ses-, 11 JJr. TtU Vi tWU UBUgi sion opens. All thisadds up to anaccused of taklng the of Mrs_ Abble Borroto wile of an oU obvious concmsion Thcie is already jby injecting ten cubic centimeters------------------------------- every hkolihood that the liver andior _ir jnto her lights will be cut out of American! He inn'Dcent to a aforethought killing and forcicrn policy at this session murder ch murdering Mrs. a Trum-in request for additional jand was held without There was no indication how quickly a final decision might be made. Some authoritative inform- ants said the President would like Law Permitting Counties to Build Roads Illegal Madison, Wis. A 1947 law which permits counties to do private road work was held unconstitutional today by the Wisconsin supreme court. The court upheld Circuit Judge Edward J. GelU in a decision involv- ing Ozaukee county. It stated that the law was unconstitutional be- cause it "results in appropriations and -expenditures of public funds for private purposes without a dl- to have his main stop-communismirect advantage accrueing to the program blocked out before By Bill Ross Washington Current spec- Supreme Court Flays Rushing Cases Through Payment of Fine Not Waiver of Right of Appeal St. Paul All judges were admonished by the Minnesota su- jpreme court today to refrain from j using methods to bring about a plea of guilty merely to get a case disposed of as a matter of con- venience to the court. This warning was contained in s, 6 to 1 decision delivered by As- sociate Justice Frank T. Gallag- jber In a case upholding, the dis- itrict court's refusal to grant ap- !peals to three youths who pleaded I guilty and paid fines for miscon- duct. After entering guilty pleas to charges Of forcing A Marshall, Mini., girl into an automobile nt night, the three boys Leonard JBoulton, 20, Richard Kwiatkoski, j 18, and Edward Swedzinski, 'claimed they were influenced into (pleading guilty by misstatements and threats of the municipal judge. Disagreeing with the majority decision was Associate Justice Harry H. Peterson. He contended the law should afford the youths an opportunity to clear themselves of the charges. Justice Peterson said: 'No innocent man should ever be subjected to the odium and disgrace of conviction of a crime. One's good name is a priceless possession. And it may be not only his sole asset, but often his most valuable one. Handicap Cited "A man with a prior conviction, however baseless, is under a hand- icap in the struggles of life in obtaining employment and ad- Simultaneously, the agency said, ulation that President Truman the present Jordanian Parliament] will ask Congress to continue rent will be dissolved and new bumped today in a report areas. Jordan occupies almost all of Arab-held Palestine except a strip of Gaza held by Egypt and a sliv- er in Syrian hands. Abdullah's troops occupy the "old city" section of Jerusalem. The other half is occupied by Is- to job over to the states. The latter possibility was raised by an official familiar with ad- ministration housing proposals slated for early consideration by Congress. That President Truman will askj vancetr.ent and In social inter- course." Justice Gallagher, however, was joined by five of his collegues who ruled the guilty pleas and pay- ment of the fines were voluntary. Consequently, the supreme court concluded, "the sentences of the court already had been executed before the attempt had been made to take the appeals and- there no longer existed any judgment from which appeals could be taken the continued rent control T, T Trt icuv (-wuLiwi raeh troops. Both Israel and Jor- tain. Plans to turn rent ceilings dan have expressed strong opposl- session of Congress opening next week gets very far along. The fact that the policy study Backed by the powerful Wisconsin tion to the United Nations assem- bly resolution calling for an in- ternational regime to rule all Jeru- salem. The Arab news agency said Arab refugees from Israel held Pal- estine henceforth would have the same rights and privileges as oth- er Jordan citizens. The agency said the ministry of refugees would be abolished and that it al- ready had been replaced by the ministry of state for rehabilita- tion and reconstruction. Restrictions on appointment of over to states, however, would mark a major shift in administra- tion housing policy. A high-ranking authority, who asked not to be identified by name, said such a policy change would be designed to lessen pos- sible congressional opposition to other points in President Tru- man's over-all housing pr6gram. hitrhlv likplv that admin- Justice, municipal or Nation straights wm be wiUmg Gallagher wrote, "to bring to accept an end to federal rent a plea ceilings and turn the matter tte case deposed of and the County Boards association the law Palestinians to Jordan govern- was passed by the 1947 legislature! ment posts would be abolished, the porter. apparently has reached the deci-lover the veto of Governor reported, adding that cus- sion stage evidently marks the endlbohm. It permitted counties to en-komSi taxes and public services of the period of "waiting for the dust to settle" In the Far East. That phrase was originally at- tributed to Acheson after he roads, appeared before com committees early this ter into contracts so that towns, were being unified. cities, villages and counties could, build, grade, surface and maintain caused a g e n c ys announcement no surprise m Cairo, where such action by Abdullah had was reported to have taken the po- sition that United States action must be delayed pending the out- come of events in China and sur- rounding areas. Mobile Force rf .gressional The Hemerl and Mendzorf Graveljb expected for some time. year. He Company of Ozaukee county, chal-j lenged the law and on March 23, 1949 Judge Gehl, who was sworn in today as a held it was unconstitutional. !c IJ__'_ I Justice Martin, who wrote the de- J3Ving Man S Lire cision, held that the construction lehl, who was sworn in j _. _ j supreme court Credited With The Navy announcement on differed from one that permits] assignment.of the aircraft to remove snow from pri-j A dog was cre- i Craig said Dr. Sanoer turned xos will transform this after the warrant was read Hillsboro County Solicitor sald: into a virtual certainty. Yet the request is nevertheless likely to be made, if only because il fits so neatly into the now jllam img said that the Seventh task fleet! vate property. He held that the lat- I "constitutes a mobile force read-iter was related to an emergency available to support U. S. na-jsituation. tional policy and to serve as a stabilizing influence in the west- malice This was the second move byj H. Craig said Dr. "There was never any presence of witnesses, heart. It was an act of ___ ___ .__ _____ ly admitted injecting the the U. S. Navy on the chessboard A ;j r established administration of air as act of mercy Craig. sald Dr. Sander told him of the seven seas to meet the sit-iAIQ TOT o.ue of asking for action which ev-j craie quoted Dr. Sander as patient died within ten minutes I nation created by the red cryone knows beforehand Congress ing. woman had suffered a long! after the injection, adding that her quest of China. vofuc-rt tn (iV-fi trAmi. _ will refuse to take. Aside irony Umc that members of from cancer "might have taxes, the Presidents message had asked nim u anythingibeen a matter of a few hours." reflect this technique throughout, jcould be done to brlng an end to1 Special emphasis will be given to her suffering. three proposals which have no, chance of passing Congress this No Attempt to Conceal Fact county solicitor added that Purpose of Injection conscious by a falling tree branch. Harvey Johnson, 28, was Injured rn __ _f! since the cases aDDeared Nevertheless, the majority group took occasion to remind courts and officials charged with the administration of justice that they cannot be "too careful in per- forming their duties to the end that the rights of all litigants and persons charged be protected un- der our laws." "We cannot admonish too strongly against any methods on the part of any courts, whether to dates'" the ofjicia told aTe-inle closed a matter of to s-ates, the official told a re jdjency Qr convenience to court." He said such a move might gainr support for expanded government! .f Peterson took the pos- aid'in the construction of tbat be so justi- togs for famines in the low andjticatlon for holdin? m criminal middle-income groups. cafS' 5f fm f de- "The President might ask that Payment of a ftoe con- continued nationwide ceil ings, a waiver oi- the rieht ot said this official, "but the states' rights idea would not be too ob- jectionable to the administration if the federal government retained some authority to impose ceilings! if severe rent gouging would occur under such a system." On the other hand, the Presi- dent's council of economic advis- ers said flatly yesterday, in a dis- cussion of wartime federal trols. that "rent control Is necessary." Also, Chairman Spence (D.-Ky.) con- still Washington Tru- dog licking his face. Thursday when a branch from ai0f the House banking committee, tree he was chopping down, broke said after a white house call that off, striking him on the head. Phy- rent control is still needed in some sicians said Johnson must have areas, including Washington. He been knocked unconscious. say whether Mr. Truman on the dog indicated, they said, that I would ask an extension of Johnson had been revived by the j present law. civil cases payment of a judgment does not. "The law should afford a man least as much protection an unjust conviction of a case as it does against at On December 9 the Navy an- man today assured the Shah of nounced plans to transfer the j Iran that the United States will heavy cruiser Rochester and thejsupport Iranian requests for loans Asked if Dr. Sander knew the antiaircraft cruiser Juneau from from the World bank injection of air would kill Mrs. BoiToto, Craig said: the Atlantic to the Pacific. The Boxer, which normally Mr. Truman also Informed the Shah that the U. S. intends to help ___ ____ __ _______ ___________ r Taft-Hartley repeal, sander made no attempt to! "That was the purpose of the in- mothers some 45 warplanes, will the Iranian government through Brannan farm plan, and fair em-jconceal the fact he gave the wom-ljection." jbe a powerful addition to the Sev- the point four program which the ployment legislation. Tnxes are an a fatai injection. j William J. Starr, the doctor's at-jenth task fleet. That fleet, bas- President has proposed to Con- now likely to mnke a fourth of, jt was an entry over Dr. Sand-'tomey, said he was "satisfied thatjed on the Philippines, now consists 'gress. This program would grant these issues which are injected er-s signature in the records of 'when all the facts are known the! of one heavy cruiser and four de-i American financial and technical strictly for the political record. I me Hillsboro county hospital Idoctor will be fully vindicated. "jstroyers. In Japan, there is a to underdeveloped countries. THERE IS JUST ONE WAY in where Mrs. Borroto died last De-j Mrs. Borroto, mother of twojarate naval force under command] in a statement released by the! which a proposal to increase taxes cember 4 that led to his ar- grown daughters, died two weeksjof General MacArthur which alsolwhite House, the President said, could be transformed from I after her admittance to the hos-! consists of one heavy cruiser and'too, this country "is currently pre- Johnson staggered a quarter of a mile to his home, then collapsed. He was still unconscious today at the Nefflsville hospital. The doctors said he had a fractured skull. Senator Sparkman (D.-Ala.) who handled rent control and housing legislation this year, said he fa- vors waiting until April before passing on continuation of controls. strictly political issue which will! Dr. Robert IE. Biron, Hillsboro'pital. jfour destroyers. be automatically shelved into a.county medical referee, said hos-j Neighbors said Mrs. Borroto had' serious issue which would receivejpitai staff members he refused to'wasted from 140 pounds to a mere serious consideration in Congress, i identify had called his attention toJBO pounds since she stricken This would be for the President notation that the air was inject-! with cancer. say boldly and with all the into the woman's veins. Her death certificate, signed by phasis at his command that a cold; Dr. Bircn said the notation wasjDr. Sander, said she died of car- war cannot be fought painlesslyimade and signed by Dr. Sander.jcinoma of the large bowel and Winona ana vicinity: any more than a hot war; and; County authorities, checking of the liver. plouoy and warmer tonight lowest that if Soviet power continues to {hospital records, arrested thej The dictionary defines that v increase while the power of the Manchester physician as he originating in the Western world declines disaster led into the institution to visit lining of a large cavity WEATHER, FEDERAL FORECASTS and vicinity: Partly cloudy rain spreading to the liver. cnn be the only ultimate result, j other patient. Yet while Secretary of Defense j Dr. Sander, a former Dartmouth Craig said that no autopsy was Louis Johnson and other ski captain, was arraign-1 performed and because of the continue to'ed at the home of Municipal Court written record of the injection it LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 bom's ending at 12 m. today: pared to offer certain military as- sistance essential to Iran." Fewer Traffic Deaths Predicted for Year an unjust judgment establishing a civil liability. One's good name deserves the same protection as his purse and property." No Written Complaints The three youths contended that no written complaints were filed and that no warrants were Issued, that they were not represented by counsel and that they were "pres- sured" into pleas of guilty by threats in the municipal court proceeding. The municipal judge the case was A. L. Soucy. the Mgh court affirmed Judge C. A. Bolloff of Lyon county dis- trict court. But, at the same time, the supreme court stressed that in the case of minors "it is always rent desirable that they be represent- ed by counsel if they wish and also that their parents be notified before a trial, if possible." Judge (Continued on Pace 10, Column 5.) JUDGE istration spokesmen pour out soothing syrup Alfred Poor. >may not be necessary to disinter "economy." there is very little! In a warrant read by the Judgejthe body. likelihood that President TrumanjDr. Sander was charged with "fel-! Mrs. Borroto's family was de- will take any such bold stand. joniously and wilfully and oi his i scribed as one of "modest means." Quirino Inaugurated As Philippine Chief Manila President ElpidlO Quirino was inaugurated for his first full term today at a colorful ceremony before a crowd of in Luneta park on Manila bay. j Quirino was cheered lustily as he __ "outlined policies he said will restore Maximum, 3o; minimum. 14: ravaged country's economy. fl. nnnP- mn sPts tic political fight. He succeeded to the office two years ago whea Pre- sident Manuel Roxas died. i tomorrow at Additional weather on Page 10. Chicago A saving of about 500 lives in 1949 depends a great deal on the nation's driving and walking habits to- morrow night. This dividend in human life was forecast today by the Na- tional Safety council after go-' ing- through its traffic score sheets for the first 11 months Of 1349. The 500 figure may be vised upward or downward, depending on motorists' and pedestrians' behavior of New Year's eve, the council said. A final traffic death toll for the year was forecast at 500. Last year the toll was 000. During November the motor death count was which was two per cent more than In the same month last year. This put the ll-montb toll at a drop of two per cent compared with 1948. Last month 307 cities had perfect records of no traffic fatalities. The largest was Long Beach, Calif., Nashville, Tenn., was second largest and Salt Lake City, Utah, third. For 11 months, 73 cities had perfect records. Passaic, N.J., was the largest; Great Falls, Mont, second, and Ann Arbor, Mich., third. Year End Edition As has been its custom for several years, The Republican- Herald will publish its annual year-end review Saturday, in- ctndlng general stories of what has occurred in the Winona area the past year and the outlook for 1950. There will be an industrial review and a sum- mary of community achieve- ments, construction, accidents, sports and Tital statistics. The edition also will review the highUichti in the news for the area surrounding Winona. Persons desiring extra copies of the Saturday issue are re- quested to call The Republi- can-Herald circulation depart- ment, phone 3321, before noon Saturday.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication