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Winona Republican Herald: Wednesday, December 21, 1949 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - December 21, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              LIGHT SNOW, SOMEWHAT COLDER VOLUME 49, NO. 260 WINONA, MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 21, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY DOWNTOWN STORES OPEN TONIGHT EIGHTEEN PAGES pies Sick of War, T Good Fellows Contributions Pass Contributions to the Winona Good Fellows fund went over the mark today with three more days to go before the Christmas weekend. Today's contributions follow: Previously 10.00 2.00 2.00 5.00 16.75 1.00 1.84 Left Banders club A friend, Cochranc Gary and Warren Home Motor Sales Telephone employes Paper boy Soroptimists club Prudential Life Insur- ance Company em- ployes.............. 15.00 Minnesota Delta Chap- ter of Beta Sigma Phi 5.00 G. Winona Musicians As- sociation. Good Fel- lows dance Marigold Dairy and employes 45.75 Patty and John Haun 2.00 Charles J. Olsen and Sons W.OO Seven-Up Bowling team, Athletic club 5.00 A friend at Alma, WIs. 1.00 Mr. and Mrs. S. Top- ness, Whalan 2.00 Lower Looney Valley Helping Hand club 5.00 AHura Elevator Com- pany officers and em- ployes 21.50 Friend of t.S.B......'. 5.00 Myrtle E, Jensen 10.00 Carolyn and Dorothy 1.00 Cuss Fund............. 2.00 Future Home Makers of Am- erica, Senior High school, Rivers Candy Company 25 pounds of peanut brittle, A friend, Edith A friend from Buffalo City clothing. Central school, Den One, Pack Julian Olson, Houston, clothing-. A TODAY- Inspector Joseph V. left, of the special investigation sQuad, and Inspector Albert Langtry, head of the police scientific laboratory, inspect dynamite and fuses found on a basement stairs of the Sed Auto Workers international headquarters at Detroit last night. The dynamite, 39 sticks, com- pletTwith two detonators and fuses, was found in a, orrugated cardboard soap box wrapped in gaily decorated Christmas paper. (AJ. Wirepbjoto to The Republican-Herald.) Plot to Blow Up Detroit U. A. W. Headquarters Foiled Russ Walk Out On Jap War Prisoner Talks Resent Criticism Of Repatriation Policy by MacArthur By Tom Lambert Tokyo Russia angrily stalked out of the Allied four-pow- er council for Japan today rather than discuss Soviet failure to com- plete repatriation of Japanese war prisoners. By the walkout, the eight-man Russian delegation avoided hear- ing General MacArthur's con- clusion that Japanese have died in Soviet prison camps from brutal treatment in "disregard for humanity." The dramatic Russian exit cli- maxed a bitter argument over council procedure. Russia's Lieutenant Winter Arrives Tonight, Experts Disagree on Time ar- rives at central standard time tonight, bringing with it the shortest day in the year. But which day; today or to- morrow? TJ. S. naval obsettatory ex- perts weren't sure. There will be only a few sec- onds difference and it would take hours of tedious calculat- ing to determine which day actually will be the shortest. The difficulty is this: Winter arrives at the moment the earth has its northern axis tilted at its maximum away from the sun. This moment occurs each year around De- cember 21. The exact moment this year is o'clock to- night, central standard time. That is so close to midnight about half of the effect of the factors that create the shortest day of the year falls on the 21st and half on the 22nd in the eastern time belt. Yule Postal Volume Over Last Year By Adolpt Bremer Cancellations at the Winona postofflce are running seven pel- ahead of a year ago, Postmaster Leon Bronk said today. Since a week ago Monday-December pieces of mail have been dispatched, compared with during the same period a year ago. Warns U. S. Must Keep Defenses Up Speaks at Dedication Of Arlington War Memorial By D. Harold O'-vcr President Tru- man said today there would never be another war if the peoples of the world, "sick of could have their way. i But while captive peoples "are made to respond to our handclasp with a mailed fist, we have no choice but to stand ready in self- he declared. The President spoke at Arlington National cemetery, accepting a carillon memorial to the war dead from the American veterans of World War n. Allied diplomats from. But the high total for a single day j General last year wil1 not Cheese Goafs Train, Truck in Collision Walworth, Wis. Wiscon- sin's famous cottage vided a seasonal coating Tuesday for two trucks, a Mil- waukee Road locomotive and parts made an attempt to blow up the C.I.O. United Auto Workers' headquarters last night. They failed, but only by a hair's breadth. They failed, but only by a hair's breadth. Russia has returned some ing season, however. prisoners in four But Mr. Bronk is confident the mas gift paper, was found at a side stairway of the union building ;uw e _ power group the United] Monday before Christmas is States, Britain, Russia and China'always a great mailing day, the business discussing re- j postmaster said, regardless of the patriation. American Chairman! William J. Sebald overruled him. White With Anger White with anger, the stocky, bull-necked Russian general .stalk- ed out. him. His delegation followed "I don't deem it possible to dis- the Derevyanko cuss said. Repatriation has long been a point of the occupation. ___Christmas falls on. On the Monday before Christmas, 1948, the postoffice canceled pieces; this Monday On an ordinary day, around the year, be- tween 15 and 20 thousand cancela- tions are made. Tapers Down New York Jail Terms May Go to Water Wasters New Tork terms were threatened today for persons who in the audience. It was only coincidence that Mr. Truman spoke on the birthday of Soviet Russia's Premier Stalin and he did not mention Russia by name. But allusions to the Russian threat to peace were plain and re- peated. They were clear, too, in a ibrief address from Norwegian Am- bassador Wilhelm Munthe de Mor- genstierne, the dean of the diplo- matic corps. The ambassador said those who died in the war should know that "without their fight the entire world might today be in a state of abject slavery." He added: Vigilance Needed "And to make that freedom pre- Yesterday the cancellations drop- 'waste water as the city struggled ped off to still the second highest total of the Yuletide mail- to make its skimpy water supply before they sputtered out, harm lessly. Except for two night workers, the union bunding was "-empty. However, lives were imperiled in a neighboring General Motors building. ofthe'immediate landscape. I As a result, authorities were The yuletlde color scheme re- confronted today with a new_ tasK suited from the collision of the passenger train and a trailer truck bearing pounds of the cheese to Chicago. George Schumert, 27, of Chicago, of his trailer had tracks at the in solving mysterious acts of vio lence against the big auto union and its leadership. Other Plots Recalled Within less than two years would-be assassins have tried to kill two of the TLA.W's prominent said the cab pEisssd. ovsr crossing at the time of the im-JReuther brothers. pact After being hit, his truck Walther Reuther, president ol caromed off another truck whlchjthe U.A.W., was shot by an un- had stopped for the train. 'known assailant in April of 1948. Cominform For Asia In Making By Joseph and Stewart Alsop all the specula- tion over the much-publicized visit of the communist leader, Mao Tze- tung, to Moscow, there is one hard fact, which can be reported on the highest authority. This is that the Chinese communist government, in n note delivered to the kremlin be- fore Mao Tze-tung's arrival In Moscow, -has politely demanded control of the city of Dairen. Dniren is the important Man- m churlnn port which the -They were rQarried m a surprise ceremony late yesterday at a lux contrary to the Yalta agreement, wious guest ranch 40 miles north of Santa Barbara, Calif. Alter the have occupied ever since the end weddmg, they departed for points of the war, Manchuria, where the1 Soviet Union has re-established the Czarist imperial position, is an ob- vious point of potential friction be- Two fuses had burned to within an inch or less of the explosives He aimost lost the use of an arm. harm. victor Reuther, the union's edu- cational director, lost an eye in a similar .shotgun attack last May. Both of the shootings still are unsolved. Police immediately linked last years. American and Japanese au- thorities have been pressing for the return of more than 000 others. As supreme command- er, MacArthur himself has roundly scored., the Soviet attitude. The Russians sent home volume of outgoing mail has reached its peak and that today will be the high mark for incoming mail. Mail trains were heavily loaded today, and the postofflce was jammed. A crew ;of nearly 100 cluding 35 busy, how- last longer. Magistrate Morris nine men from yesterday for the s the Reuthers bes e of thf 01 me Tne Kussians sem< numc last summer and announced that j ever, sorting and delivering. Nine was all except "war crimin-lmen and five trucks were keeping cvii vail, those who come after them may have to stand up, and go down, the same way if, God forbid, the jfree world should Rothenbergichallenged by [forces. "For there is one thing we never ever again ba antidemocratic pftrh vesteraav lor perjiiiiLujg leakage or other waste and com- will accept, and that is totalitarian slavery. President Truman said that "it man could achieve self government and fclnahip with his God through- mented: "Our water supply is so critical- ly low .that drastic punishment of wasters is demanded and second offenders will probably straight prison sentences." The city's reservoirs are nowi ynQ auiii-i -WVM get out the world peace would not trem- ble In the constant dread of war." is exhausted from ths cording Tnr Josenn A Inspector Joseph A. w Krug of the police special investi- gation squad. One long held theory has been that a vengeful conspiracy is afoot against the Reuthers and the un- n. An anonymous call to a Detroit ion. AH im.uj-ij'mvuj w newspaperman led to what was farther, at first a vain police search at the Clark Gable Weds Widow of Fairbanks Gable is honeymooning somewhere today with ly Sylvia Stanley, the 39-year-old widow of Douglas Fairbanks, They were They are expected to return to HoDywood in time to sail tomorrow on the Lurline for a two-to-four- OH ijuriinc tt tween the krerolin and the Chinese( fe junl-et to Honolulu. J _ communists. The Chinese demand for Dairen has therefore given rise to the usual hopeful speculation about Chinese Titoism. In fact, the Chinese note on Dai- ren should almost certainly be in- rumorj of tcrpreted in the opposite way. Ill nev "The so-called because of his box-office drawing power, and Lady Sylvia long have been friends. She arrived here about but there were no engagement. suggests that relations between new Gable divorced Lord starjey of Alderley 18 months Moscow and Peipinjr nre now Gable 48 is her fourth hus- so satisfactory n basis that 'd was dlvorced in 1935 Chinese communists can dare to the request i greetings will be thwarted, consumption and hunger, and weary of government, I theless. Despite warnings, gajloris daily, the city has the troubles suffered for so many ..oiaJnprsnns ttrf. mailing two-cent greet- clirmlv Ipft before vears. If we could mobilize world t nf tne Japanese uuveriiiiiciii', L wMcrThas besieged by rela-lpersons are tives of still-missing soldiers. cards with mcomplete or ln- The Soviet stand on repatriation correct addresses, and without even has been damaging in Japan the prestige of Russia and Japanese Communist party. to the To a return address about 62 days supply left before pressure fails if present results from conservation measures con- day's walkout will knock it down union headquarters. Later two union employes came( upon the wrapped sticks of explo-i sive, tied up in gay red and white j Christmas paper.1' The destructive package lay at an outside stairway not far from the adjacent General Motors re- search laboratory. Had there been a explosion, lives j might have been lost, police said.! A number of workers were in the G. M. laboratory. Inspector Albert Langtry of the] police scientific laboratory said Loss In Barn Fire Near Ripon Cards Destroyed Since the postoffice cannot fur- nish directory service for a two- cent stamp, such greetings are headed for the wastpaper basket. The local postoffice has been re- quired to destroy about 200 a day for the last week, the postmaster said. "In these days it's foo'Jsh to mail a letter without the street address, the box number or the rural route, unless the letter is to a prominent firm. People are always moving, land oftentimes without notifying the I postoffice. It should be realized that I postoffice employes cannot keep up [with everyone's Post- 'master Bronk said. years. If we could mobilize opinion among all men who walk the earth, there would never bo another war. Earth Divided "This we can not do alone. For The city has directed that ship- ping lines make arrangements for their vessels to obtain their waterjthe earth is deeply divided between elsewhere when possible and. re- free and captive peoples. There la frain from taking water In New no appeal to the brotherhood of men Ripon, be frnnk. Moreover, this interpre- by Lord Ashley, who named Fair banks as co-respondent. Gable'st DC irniiK. moreovei, jui.cit.ic- banbs as co-respondent. Gable's tation is supported by reports wife was Josephine Dillon. another event which has were dlvorced six years later far too little attention the m J931 ne married Bia Lang-, tablishment of a Cominform dlvorce came m 1939.1 Asin. I shortly afterward Gable took his! FOR IN SETTING UP this bride_ Actress Caroie Lom-i atic Cominform, the center of thejbard Both had a great capacity stage has not been reserved fun Once she gave nim a ham the kremlin. as in Europe. Instead, a uftuie to his acting. On an- as a to his acting. On an- the most conspicuous role occasion, it was a jalopy, been assigned to the Chinese com-jpainted wmte and decorated with munists. ired hearts, as a Valentine present. The Cominform for Asia was: Gable an addict of fine cars, established under the euise of ft high-powered engine in the meeting of all the Asiatic mem-, t crate and faovs it f0r a bers of the World Federation r Trade Unions, which took place in, Mlss Lombard was killed in 1942. Peiping towards the end of plang carrvmg her home from vember. A: this meeting, trade wftr bond tour crashed ionism was not even discussed. Las Vegas, Nev., canning stead, the strategy to be followed ;Carole her mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Jr. the communist conquest of Asia Peters and 19 others to their! was analyzed and established. i Russian delegates participated. deaths. Yesterday's ceremony was wit-j not by the Russians, but by the Chinese. Principal speakers were Li Li-san and Liu Shao-chi, both Russian delegates Yesterday's ceremony was wit-j but the strategy was announced, nessed by a close friends and Russians, but by the_______..v wore some ranch hands. The rites were performed by the Rev. Aage Mol- pastor of the Danish Lutheran Moscow trained, and both, cof'ichurch in Solvang, a community trary to report, apparently wholly rancij. vows were said in loyal to the Mao Tze-tung ranch Uvlng roomi whlch was ment. It is further significant palmSi white chrys- eti.oti.pv laid down at ojrtngnuuns and evergreen boughs. Attending were Lady Sylvia's Sister and husband, Mr. and Mrs. J Basil Bleck of Santa Monica, and owners of the ranch, Mr. and the Asiatic strategy laid down Feipine is not Stalin's, but Mao Tze-tung's. IT IS TO BE BASED, not on proletarian revolt in the big cities u _ (the strategy ordered by Lvjln cilham, In 1927. which failed of Gable. Fifty-two head! He again urged use of the three- there was enough dynamite to of cattle and four horses were lost cent Christaas have destroyed the three tern on the gain York if their supply will last to their next port. 3 Children Die In Flash Fire at Wisconsin Rapids have destroyed me uucc at-uiji--" in discussing me canceuauuii gaui, brick U.A.W building. ithe August Hoffman farm today. postmaster pointed out thatF E It was prepared, Krug said, Flames destroyed a 108-foot barn made despite an and -some one with a lot of experience; which contained 60 tons of hay The j meter machines wi_ cap total loss was estimated unofficially____. iroorc experiencej with dynamite." I Fuses Bam Out Two 90-inch fuses had been light- Vernon Dorsey, Wisconsin Rapids, Wis. Three children died Tuesday night while five brothers __id their parents es- thelr rural home was wj_ caped as leveled nona business houses. Five years d ,j children of Mr. ago there were five such who live in dally fear of the con- centration camp. "Until the captive peoples of the world emerge from darkness, they can not see the hand we hold out in friendship. While they are made io respond to our handclasps with a mailed fist, we have no choice but to stand ready in self defense." The President said that by gene- rous sharing of material goods ths United States has restored to many peoples faith in themselves, in free- dom, and In certain triumph of con- fidence over fear. He .added: "Just as long as we continue to face our world responsibilities with the courage and realism we have already shown, we shall deserve the right to and for lasting peace." ment. longtime! We cut a four-tiered wedding cake iwith a sword. ed but had gone out. One burned to within an eighth of an inch of I its end. One inch remained of the (other, Krug said. Reporter Jack Pickering of the Detroit Times said he had receiv- ed a. telephone call about 8 p.m. that dynamite had been placed at the "back door" of the U.A.W. building. The caller did not identify him-l self. In intermittent rain and murk, police made a search of the area containing both the U.A.W. head- quarters and General Motors, main office building. But they found nothing. Toward p.m. Jack Krajmk, 35, a maintenance man, and George Thomas, 58, night janitor, came upon the explosive. One detonator was defective, Krug said. An overly tight taping also may .have prevented a firing of the charge, he said. A half hour before finding the dynamite, Thomas said he saw an undentified car leaving the park- ing lot at the rear of the union building. Thomas got the license number and turned it over to police. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity: Mostly cloudy tonight and Thursday with intermittent light snow. Somewhat colder. Low tonight 14 in the city, near ten in the country. High LOCAL WEATHER Official" observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 43; minimum 13; noon, farm from Hoffman, was driving i_ i ago mere wcic j. who leases the there are 19i Mrs. Frank Sonheim, were hour The President yesterday spent an posto2jce windows will be po w home from Fond du Lac, where his n aU day Saturday and carriers be outi too_ on Sunday and parcels and special de- wife had just given birth to a The hired man, Lloyd King, awakened by a passing motorist who-livery jetters will be delivered, how- had seen the flames. King summon- ed the Ripon volunteer fire depart- ever. with Mrs. Franklin lan rs. ran n, hour junch wt rs. ran Nancy, seven months, Gary, ROOSevelt discussing United Na ..Knj_r. and Robert, 14, Kenneth, nine, was overcome by smoke and hospitalized here. Not a stick of furniture was sav- ed from the two story wooden one-half miles house, one and west of here. m i, imcxiust ui i but rather on agrarian guerilla j The bride groom both worej The couple obtained a marriage (Continued on Pace 9, Column 6.) blue. Champagne was served at ajlicense earlier in the day at San (Continued reception afterward and Mrs, Ga-Luis Obispo, Calif. 15- precipitation, trace: sun sets tonight at sun rises tomorrow at Additional weather on Page 8. fLUUAC V Vi ii tions affairs. Later In the day, Mr. Truman went over the new federal budget with Secretary of the Treasury Sny- der and Budget Director Pace. Then Secretary of State Acheson brought Mm up to date on international problems. Robbers Sentenced !At Prairie du Giien Prairie du Chien, formatory terms were given to two youths yesterday for the isafe robbery at the Hess Imple- iment Company here last October. I Clarence Boots of McGregor and JRobert Eickhacker of Luxemburg, 'both 20, pleaded guilty to charges bf breaking and entering and lar- iceny. Each drew a one to three- year term In Green Bay state re- formatory. A third young man, also 20 and of Luxemburg, will appear for pre- liminary hearing Wednesday on tha same charges. He has denied tak- ing part in the burglary. Republican-Herald photo Bis Day At The Winona Postoffice: Employe Omer Kulas, 427 East Second street, stands among the packages and mail bags in the busiest week the year.   

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