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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: December 20, 1949 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - December 20, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              SNOW, MUCH COLDER VOLUME 49, NO. 259 WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 20, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY GIVE TO THE GOOD FELLOWS EIGHTEEN PAGES FELLOWS I UP AND COME ACROSS FOR COOP This Cartoon Was Drawn especially for the Wlnona Good Fellows by Frank O. King, creator of the Gasoline Alley comic strip which appears dally in this paper. King is no stranger to this part of the country. He was born in Tomah, Wis., and went to school there. Later he was an artist for the old Minneapolis Times. It's still not too late to send or bring in your contribution to the Good Fellows. Do it today, won't you? Be a Good Fellow The following is a list of contri- butions to the Good Fellows fund to date: Previously listed ......HG39.88 Dakota, Minn......... 2.00 Harry Armitage 5.00 Bicsanz Stone Company employes 22.00 A friend, C. W. B...... 30.00 Wilfred H. Lauer, Jr. 5.00 Bee Line Service 5.00 A. J. M............... 2.00 Wlnona Soroptlmlst club, second check from Sale of old automobile license plates 22.43 A friend from Bethany A. W. Kragc, Culedonla 5.00 Happy Dan and his Skclly Boys 5.00 Baertsch 3.00 A friend, Arcadia...... 2.00 A friend from Kellogrg 5.00 Charles Arns, Harmony 2.00 Steve and Gary 2.00 A Good Fellow 1.00 Mr. and Mrs. H....... 2.00 Mary and Janet 2.00 Winona Junior Cham- ber of Commerce 25.00 William and Laura, Waumandee, canned goods 2.00 Sandllow Baker M. B.................. 5.00 Carpenters Local 307 15.00 O'Dwyer Wed In 8-Minute Stuart, Fla. Mayor Wil- liam O'Dwyer of New York, tanned _ and happy, was married today to [and I dislike dictatorships." Union of S.E.Asia Forming King Protests Council Stand Of Youngdahl Takes a Walk' Over Decision on Prospecting Permits St. Paul A decision on 53 iron ore prospecting permits still' was lacking today after State Aud- itor Stafford King "took a walk" from an executive council meeting where they were being considered. King left the session yesterday after a spirited discussion- with Governor Youngdahl. It was. prompted by a letter read to the! council by Chester S. Wilson, state conservation commissioner. In it, he asked further time for study before the bids were considered. He also suggested that high bid- ders be asked to submit their op- erating plans. The governor said he agreed with Wilson's views, whereupon King renewed words that have been passing between him and Youngdahl for the past several weeks. "This said King, "that the othfer members of the council will not be permitted to exercise their own judgment and can only decide whether to approve or dis- approve the governor's decisions. May I be excused. I see no reason for us being here." He left the meeting room before the session adjourned. Others Present Other council members present were Secretary of State Holm and State Treasurer Schmahl. Absent was Attorney General Burnquist. King took the position that coun-, cil members, all of them elected officials, have the same responsi- bility as the governor. He main- tained that Wilson should carry out the council's -wishes even if Young- dahl votes against them. In reply to a question after the meeting, King said: "It is not that I am jealous of my prerogatives. I like to live in a free country Red Advances May Determine Anticommunism British Recognition In China to Curb Resistance Moves radiant Elizabeth Sloan Simpson in a simple ceremony at St. Joseph's Catholic church. The Rev. Timothy J, Geary per- formed the ceremony which he de- scribed as "very simple and very Deautiful." The ceremony lasted eight min- utes. Both O'Dwyer and his bride were deeply moved and exchanged vows in voices hardly above a whisper. O'Dwyer's voice could not be heard in the first row. Miss Simpson spoke her vows in a slightly firmer voice. She stood erect and looked at the priest as he blessed the ring, first in Latin, then in English. Best Man David Martin, general manager of the New York Athletic (Continued on Page 15, Column 4.) O'DWTER No One Was Injured In This Mishap today near Arcadia, Wis., when this school bus skidded on the wet highway, spun around and plunged 12 feet into a creek. It occurred on highway 95 two miles Lorianc and Naomi Lee, Hous- ton, Minn, box of clothing. Mrs. Henry and jam. Mr, and Mrs. Del overcoat. A friend. Cochranc, two boxes of clothing. Bob L. and M. Winona route clothing. Barbara Rev. Simon and and clothing. A Harlan and Ann Italian Grapes For Rhineland Shipment of worth of grapes to western Ger- many is under way s.s a part of Italian foodstuffs valued at scheduled to help replenish the cupboards of the Allied occu- pied zones. Official announcements said a re- cent commercial agreement provides for the following shipments: Fresh fruits, vegetables and new potatoes tomatoes tomato products, dried! fruits and nuts milk and; ment producM olive oil and various other foods WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS Wlnona and vicinity: Rain chancing to snow and much colder tonicht. Near cold wave conditions Wednesday with snow ending in forenoon. Strong northwesterly winds tonight. Low tonight IS; high Wednesday 22. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum. 40: minimum, 27; noon, 40; precipitation, trace; sun sets tonight M sun rises to- morrow at Additional weather on Page 15. The governor said he would call another council "when I am ready to proceed with the permits." Also awaiting council action are six 25-year leases on mining prop- (Contlnued on Page 14, Column 7.) KING Cold Warning Issued Chicago The IT. S. Weather bureau today issued the following special cold wave warning: "Cold wave warnings have been issued from Minnesota and the northwest portions of Iowa and Wisconsin for tonight. Temperatures falling to near ten below northern Minnesota to zero to five below Iowa and Wis- consin by Wednesday morning." Big School Bus, Truck, Plunge Into Creek Bed By Staff Writer Arcadia, Wis. A truck and a (school bus plunged one on top 'of the other over a 12-foot abut- ment into a creek bed about two miles from here this morning. Amazingly, nobody was hurt! The truck, driven by Francis Ber- Marshal 70 Wednesday Thousands of Gifts Sent to Joe Stalin By Alvin J. Stcinkopf greatest giveaway jackpot program in history is on today, with Russia's Joseph Stalin on the receiving end. Stalin, overlord of world communism, hits the jackpot tomorrow when he reaches the age of 70. How much the take in birthday presents is worth Is anybody's guess. Tons and tons of many that not Manila Plans for a con- ference of southeast Asian nations in March are almost complete. In- formed sources said today. But it probably won't end up as the anti- communist front it started out to be. Sources close to President Elpi- dio Quirino said his original idea of a strong union to oppose the spread of communism in Asia has been watered down considerably. For this they cite two reasons: The red military sweep in China and the probable recognition of the Chinese communist regime by British Commonwealth nations. Quirino and Chiang Kai-shek, the No. 1 man of Nationalist China, drafted the basic framework for an Asian union at a meeting in Uie Philippines last July. Chiang later went to Korea to confer with President Syngman Rhee of the Republic of South Korea, who had been an enthusi- astic supporter of Quirino's origin- al proposal. The United States never warmed up to Quirino's suggestion that it be the keystone of a Pacific coun- terpart to the North Atlantic alli- ance. The TT. S. made it plain, how- ever, that the Asian countries were free to go ahead on their own with- out American underwriting. Later, the U. S. issued a white paper on China, writing off the Chiang Kai- shek regime as a failure. Quirino has been reported revis- ing the complexion of his proposal. It was described as noncommunist instead of antlcommunist. Chiang and Nationalist China were quietly eased out of the picture. Whether Chiang or the remnant Nationalist government will be In- vited to the meeting to the Philip- pines in March was not disclosed. The sources said Burmese recog- nition of the Chinese red govern- ment would not bar Burma from President Tru-'attendance. man returned today from a three-! Indications point now to ft work- week Florida vacation, looking and rested for the weeks of hardjany strong stand which would ali- west of Arcadia, Driver of the bus was Marcel (Fuzzy) Rohn, Ar- cadia, who was headed to pick up youngsters when he was stopped by the freak mishap. Republican-Herald photo in, centuries could one man use them up have descended on Moscow from the communist world. Reports reaching London through' Dear Comrade." Besides, "there will be a verif- iable flood of big crates contain- ing the more unwieldy approached the "S" curve motorcycles to air- miles west of here on highway iand low-hung fog, and his machine 1 Blooming Prairie Residents Killed In Traffic Mishaps Truman Returns To Washington In Fighting Trim work ahead of him. eimte any South Asian nation. It is no secret that Quirino participation by as India is neces- His plane, the Independence, Handed at National airport about j p. m. (E.S.T.) after a hour, 46 minute flight from Asian bloc. Indian Prime Min- West. lister Jawaharlal Nehru has repeat- Tanned, relaxed and cheerful, said India would not join any looked in good health in spite ofibloc for or against communism. the "bay window" which apparent-! ly was of less concern to him than I to his physician, Brigidiar General Wallace H. Graham. jalso went out of control. It turned completely around, birthday gift Mr. Truman is going down the', Blooming: Prairie, IJP) in his "State of the of per Weekend traffic mishaps cost the) message for virtually every meas- for a lives of two Blooming Prairie resi- jear. for Stalin and Norman Thora- had Berry's truck, and backed as the jackpot ,is worth more than the concrete abutment just where a one-way bridge begins. Lands on Truck The rear portion of his bus landed Shoes, socks, neckties, choice foods, wines, spirits, toys, dolls, books, automobiles, horses, motor- cycles, airplanes, locomotives and ger and Ed Prusha, 55. The measures include civil rights by the fair em- Thorager died in a Rochester hospital of injuries suffered when his car apparently went out of control and slid down an embank- culvert four Jployment practices bill tional health program, the na- expandedl social security and additional pow-' and reclamation projects, among others. Body of Girl, 4, Sought in Ruins Of Mauston Fire Mansion, Wis. Workers searched the charred ruins of Aides emphasized there will bejfarm home today for the body of a 3 "turning back" from the coursejgirl, four, who is believed to have _______ _____ _ advocated in his 1948 speech- died in a Monday fire. on the hood of the truck. Berry had even whole factories are among, gone for help and was not at manv carloads of presents con- ene when Rohn met with a similar j verging upon the kremlin from tnejimies north of acre. Jmrting campaign and that he is No trace of little Jean Bryant was isfortune. satellite areas and far territories) Prusha was fatally hurt when he stump again next found by nightfall in the ember- was struck down by bis own stalled jyear to help elect candidates tojfilled all_that remains of see: misfortune. _ Both drivers were tossed around i OI_me in the accidents, but neither suf-' jfered any injuries. Parents who gathered at the spot to view the rather unusual scene noiiurs, pieugea ui the. affirmations of loyalty and "om tne close of day when the bus was Moscow. with youngsters. Sone for eacn Wisconsin Highway Patrolman jmunist east Herman Sense and of n cars With the gifts come all sorts when another car struck! Congress who think along his lines, ithe two-story dwelling, honors, pledges of special frnni )hp rpqr on Final decisions are yet to bej Firemen fighting flames at the 'made on whether to seek elimina-irural residence heard screams and He died in Qf wartime excise taxes andjbeJIeve that the tyke sought refuge to advocate higher taxes on profitsjin a stair closet. Officers identified Ed Horecka, to Offset them and attempt to The fire occurred about 3 p. m. tion, endearing greetings in the south of Owatonna. joined in "expressing gratitude" that familiar communist pattern. [hospital there, the accident hadn't happened at the' Long hauled Warsaw with County Traffic Officer Maurice! Presents from Poland. The locomo- Mayor William O'Dwyer and his bride leave the church after their wedding this morning at Stuart, Fla., receiving congratulations from local residents. (AP. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) also In Scow were both called. They of the train was almost hiddenjnospitaL Imate that damage to the bus willjby the huge portrait of Stalin itj_----__ irun well over while the truck carried as it pulled out. damage will amount to more than! Numerous cities in the Soviet or-- according to their estimates. bit have held public displays of Truck Was Empty the presents. In impoverished War- The truck driven by Berry is own- were needed to hoJdj ed by Leo Christiansen of In Riga capital of. River Falls and had been used to! the unwilling satellite Latvia, Ihaul lime. It was empty this halls were needed was driviniz to Many factories in Russia and ithe communist states report! Rohn was 'driving one of '_ ?_lal1" outPut pledges school Joseph Gamoke 01 Arcadia. GO, of Owatonna as the driver ofjance the budget for the fiscal year Jin a home three miles northeast of the second auto involved. Horecka starting next July 1. ;here on county trunk G. Jean's Mr Truman has called a full-ifather, Raymond Bryant, a trues was reported in serious condition, ,le cabinet Sessi0n at the Whitejdriver was at Chicago on a run. Her the Owatonna Municipal I House for 9 a.m. Thursday to was at work in a Mauston cuss these and other problems. igarment factory and her older sis- ter, Sharon, about seven, was at school. The victim's maternal grand- mother, Mrs. Casper Halverson, was watching Jean, her brother, Forrest, about five, and a sister, Elizabeth, two. Casper Halverson, the grand- father, is an invalid and was in an upstairs bedroom. Forrest and Elizabeth were led to safety when the fire broke out. Mrs. i was driving one of ouipui U. S., Britain and Canada plan to build mili- Halverson then climbed a ladder buses owned and operated byif aUn's name by workers seewngitary equipment to a comrnon interchangeable standard but it may be flvejand rescued her husband from the Gamoke of Arcadia. Thelto exceed the live year pidiij s Arms Standardizing Will Take 5 Years seven-ton machine is one of seven i jbuses operating in the Arcadia con- Isolated district this year. the new standardized items come off the production lines, Beldes' Burgman Given 6-20 Years Washington (.7) Herbert John Borgman, former Ameri- can embassy clerk in Berlin, was sentenced today to six to 20 years in prison as a traitor. Burgman. 53, was convicted November 15 of treason for his wartime broadcasts over the Nazi radio. He is 3 native of Hokah, Minn. Federal District Judge Alex- ander Holtioff sentenced Borg- man and ordered him sent to the federal penitentiary at Lcw- Pa. The maximum penalty ctrold. have been death. The minimum for treason is five years in prison and a fine. Burgman was the eighth Am- erican convicted of treason in World War n. Seven others have been charged with betray- ing their country. Busman admitted during his five-week trial that he made broadcasts over the German shortwave radio station "De- nnder the alias of "Joe Scanlon." Be insisted, however, he had been forced to do so be- cause of fear of the nazi ges- tapo. The government contended he had willingly cast his lot with the enemy and "gave them aid and comfort." Bnrginan served with the American expeditionary forces jn the first world war and joined the State department staff in Berlin in 1921. He was chief clerk of the U. S. embassy there when this country declared war on Germany in 19-tL Governments of the three countries announced the plan yesterday. they said, is to make military arp imveilmeiThe aira oi the standardization plan, Stalin in Brl- weapons and supplies usable by the Prague" They are hav-'armed forces of all three nations ing special holidays in his honor, j jf artiilery, for example, were The highest mountain in shells made for thejwhile Slovakia, Gerlachovka, being renamed "Mount Stalin." jfit e___.....______..._ ._ A delegation of 17 persons, same wouid De true and eluding the lady foreign minister, ;aircraft Ana Pauker, has left Romania, to deliver carloads of I presents to Moscow. also covers "operational proce- dures." Defense officials said that !while it may take five years to of anyone of the three wouldjget the new standardized eqiup- e guns Of the other two rolling, standardization of procedures should upstairs bedroom. He was hospital- ized with painful, but not serious, bums. The cause of the fire was not immediately determined. Driver Killed Dickinson, N. D. Herman B. Martinson, 18, of Finley, N. p., died in a hospital here of injuries suffered over the weekend when his Members of the staff of "the sec- retary of defense told reporters that the three countries wi come much faster. The arrangement, they said, does not provide for the exchange ventional types of weapons, com- munications equipment, transpor- tation, engineering and quarter- master equipment and medical supplies. Any one of the three nations then of Congress oppose strongly any sharing of atomic weapon informa- tion. The standardization agreement was described as a verbal under- standing which grew out of fight- QLLLICICU. UVC1 HI'S VVCtrtCliU. WlllitA J-UO A j _ car failed to make a highway curve (will be free to propose standard-, jng together, and in some in- nearby and overturned onto himFatioa anv Particular item. (stances using each other's equip- after he was thrown out of it. The standardization agreement meat during World War H.   

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