Saturday, December 3, 1949

Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - December 3, 1949, Winona, Minnesota FAIR, COLDER TONIGHT, SUNDAY Basketball Tonight KWNO-FM VOLUME 49, NO. 245 WINONA, MINNESOTA, SATURDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 3, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES TODAY- Russ Attack On Reporters Held Hohor By Joseph and Stewart Alsop Washington Perhaps Andrei Vlshinsky was showing unusual knowledge of American criminal history when he denounced these correspondents as "congenital mur derers" at the United Nations last week. A century of so ago poor Dr. Webster undeniably dismem- berer! rich Professor Parkman, and stuffed the pieces Into the Harvard physics laboratory furnace. And poor Dr. Webster was undeniably the great great great uncle, or first cousin nine times removed, or some such relation, of these cor- respondents. Once this rather moldy old fact Is known, everything naturally follows from It. Has not the great academ- ician Lysenko already announced the sacred theory of the Inheritance of acquired characteristics? And is] not the inheritance of a great-great-' uncle's genes and chromosomes a mere minor miracle, by the stand- ards of Soviet science? The case Is proved, beyond a doubt. IN SHOUT, there Is no use argu- ing the major charge of the Soviet minister of foreign affairs. Mr. Vlshinsky went on, however, to des- cribe these correspondents as "bandits of the phrase borrowed from the pages of "Prav which probably means the same thing as such epithets "interventionist" and as used by many worthy persons In this country. It may thus be permissible for these correspondents to forget, momen- tarily, the normal rules of the re- porter's trade, and to explain why they write In a way to get them- selves called such hard names. Every reporter has, after all, an Inner picture of the world, which makes the day's events seem Im- portant or unimportant, serious or comic. One reporter, with one kind of inner picture, will be solemn about the curious charge of Guy Oabrlelson, chairman of tha Re- publican national committee, that President Truman was trying to steal the headlines from the dim little Republican farm conference by announcing the Soviet- atomic bomb. Another reporter, 'with, an- other inner picture, will be equally solemn about the worst maunder- ings of Henry A. Wallace. THE VIEWS of these particular reporters lie somewhere between these two extremes, and more to the left than to the right. Once this has been said, however, it Is then necessary to Inquire how ser-, lously a reporter takes the pro- fires. u cesses of history; and. If he is Scrub thickets and lush timber- American, what role he gives lands were in the paths of blazes America in the historic process. 3 Perish as Oklahoma Wood Dormitory Burns Is There Anyone in Winona who doubts there is need in many Winona homes this Christmastime? If there is, let him study this actual photograph, taken Wednesday afternoon in a Winona one of many which Good Fellows workers know about. No, this is not a posed picture, but a photograph of conditions just as they were when a Republican-Herald photographer, tipped off by a Good Fellows worker, dropped In. Living under these condi- tions of squalor are a mother and six children. The children are aged one and a half, two and a half, five, six, eight and nine. The oldest boy will be ten the day before Christmas! Little Judith Ann will be nine New Year's Day 1950! Total income ol the family is a week and on this the mother struggles to clothe and feed her family. If you lived in this house, if you had six children to care for with only a week, would you look forward to Christmas, 1949, with much anticipation? You can help make Christmas a happy one for cases just exactly like this one if you send a cash contribution to the Good Fellows nonprofit organiza- tion of workers who are busy as bees trying to bring Christmas to every Winona home. Make your checks payable to the Good Fel- lows and send them today to the Good Fellows club, care of The Republican-Herald. Republican-Herald photo Gulf Coast Forests Hard Hit by Fires New Orleans, La. Vast patches of scorched earth scarred the gulf coastal region today as firefighters scanned the skies for rain that would snuff hundreds of Sicilian Town in Path Of Erupting Volcano Catania, Sicily Fiery lava reported on this most advanced of from erupting Mount Etna today threatened the little Sicilian town of Maletto but an official source at noon (5 a. m. said the burning flow considerably appeared to have decreased because new craters were acting as "safety valves." from the town of inhabitants. The police chief at Catania, who He estimated the "pent-up" lava, kilometers inow was flowing from at least ten openings in the mountain's side. had "slowed down" several In the case of these particular in Mississippi and Alabama, where in some areas wild game fled for reporters the answers to these! safety and householders labored to Questions' are simple It would be i keep the fire from their doors. Dleiisant to pretend 'that we arei In Mississippi, the state forestry living In the secure and happy commission reported more than 167 world of our grandparents. It would j major Mazes in the state's 46 pro- be soothing to believe that the counties. Weary crews faced: morsel-ss advances of science and1 a busy weekend. In the rich delta; tcchno'OKV are not by indirect ef-jthe situation was reported out of feet constantly increasing the im-ihand, with fires "too numerous to port'ance and extending the tiers of state power in society. But! State Forester Albert Legget es- thesc are aspects of the historic itlmated almost 90.000 acres had which cannot be wished! been blackened in the protected process away. Nationalists Watch Control Of Reds Grow By Spencer Moosa Chenetn, China Chinese Nationalist leaders watched the in- At dawn, exactly 24 hours after Etna began its new eruptions, mon- strous flames shot toward the sky from the main crater. A four-sec- ond earthquake jolted the area with a terrifying roar, witnesses reported. One witness said the lava had reached a point three miles from Maletto, destroying outlying farm houses. The flow advancing on Maletto I appeared no longer to threaten j Bronte, a town of southwest, Maletto. The lava stream came' !from one of three new craters (which Europe's highest volcano pushed open yesterday. No casualties had been reported. Be a Good Fellow The following Is a list of contribu- tions to the Good Fellows fund to date: Previously listed ........J908.00 A Citizen-Friend 3.00 M. S.................... 2-00 Gary Rnehmann........ 1.00 Hal Tnst, Jr., La Crosse, Wis......... 1.00 From Independence, Wis. 1.00 Nancy Gorman.......... 5.00 W. V. Williams.......... 1.00 O and K................ 10.00 From a friend........... 1.00 A friend 1-00 W.M.C. Inc. and employes Mr. and Mrs. William M. Christensen 10.00 From the grandchildren 30.00 Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Warmington.......... 25.00 No name-----............ 2.00 A friend 2.00 A friend 1-00 The Soroptimist club of Winona from the sale of auto plates........... 30.40 Standard Lumber Com- pany employes yard and general office 60.00 Employment Picture Good, Leader Reports Predicts Voters Will Force Pension Program Washington Ewan Clague, commissioner of labor said today the nation's employ- j ment situation looks better to himj than at any time in the past year. Clague said in an address pre- pared for the American Welfare association: "The general picture seems to be one of a gradual strengthening of employment In most manufacturing industry." But while the employment pic- ture looks good, he said, unem- ployment may go up too. He said this is normal right after Christ- mas. Clague said one thing that may! boost unemployment next year that a more persons will enter the labor force. He said there always are about new workers every year, but in 1950 an additional quarter of a million veterans will finish training cours-j es and start looking for jobs. j The government's labor tics chief also said pensions forj everybody seem a sure bet with "the old and the near-old" making half the nation's voting popu- lation. Clague said many workers be- An Unidentified Student carries his belongings away from burning dormitory at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Okla. The dormitory caught fire early Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) tween 40 and 60 are "very prop erly concerned about their bleak Crosse, Wis. future once they become branded as 'too old to work'." 'And these two groups the old and the a very potent force tn our society Clague said. "Between them they now ac- count for half the population voting age and their relative strength is growing each year. "Because of their mature years and experience they exert mure- over a greater than proportionate influence in community affairs and in the councils of labor. a democratic society, Larson Judge Delays Ruling On 2 Witnesses Circui 2-Story Building Used by Navy During Wartime Judge Roland J. Steinle held today that the bond of confidence between itend to employes of the doctor. The judge, however, called for further arguments on the question-------------------- whether two Minneapolis women !of the building and equipment at whipped through a wooden dormitory on ;he University of Oklahoma campus early today, killing at leazt three studenta. More than three hundred escaped the bilming former Navy barracks but 19 were Injured, two critically. The three bodies were removed, from the- ruins but were unidenti- fied. An official in the office of Dr. George Cross, university president, estimated the damage from the loss could testify about an alleged at- tempt by Arnold Larson to have plastic surgery done on his nose shortly before his arrest. Larson, 35, zens, it is almost a truism to state that their voice will be heard, and that their just demands will be met. So much is self evident." Clague said medical science has boosted the life expectancy of a I white male from 48 years in 1900 icountics and more than red shadow spread into IrTthis new world of increasing i acres in the 36 unprotected coun-lthejr lajt major malnland haven of mor; ferent forms of society dThe protected counties levy a stern China today. had acre tux on The Nationalists'tried to get their government going again in this hopelessly overcrowded new refugee emerged But this is also an aspect, to finance fire control. of the historic process that must! Les Sessions. Leegett's assistant, be faced In the free world, last night "It will take a gen- Wisconsin Tobacco Loan Rates Set faults, me luiai ut uit: amn. W..LW.L may grow and docs grow with Sunday wi cry" month and year. But the rulejthing yet." Washington The Agricul- jture department yesterday an- --ed price the 1949 Wisconsin tobacco A woman's coat. Two friends from East Fourth A 4-Year-Old Girl Burned at Duliitfi Duluth all it, multiformitv and all its !eral rain to help, and the forecast capital. But the communists mayj fnults the total power of the state i is for scattered showers. It looksinot let them stay here very long. ucparnucm. f lnu" "I be worse than any- The reds plunging deep into west-Inounced price support loan rates Daughter 01 ern China, cut the highway between for tobacco Cayan, 13 V. Carol Cayan, four, to about 66 today. There are now men and women aged 65 or over, or one out of every 13 persons, Clague said. He calculated that 50 years from now, In the year 2000, the number will have increased to or more than one out of every eight persons. The problem, he said, has be- come acute with the rise of the mass we had a largely rural economy, older peo- ple simply tapered off activities on the farm; now "much more job requirements seem to require a complete break from regular vocations. Clague said the steady growth Persons seems of "the free world" i? that, no matter! The Mggest single conflagration ichengtu and Kumming, 390 milesicrop. how much state power may reported in Mississippi was in Kern-] to the scuth. This official report j Commodity Credit corporation the state is there to serve the county, where acres information that the com-jioans will be available to growers divuUial. the citizen, the man in was blazing, street. And the ether hand street Is the mt. _ personal machinery of the state. [Watson, who toured tie Birming- ham area in a helicopter, said IN THIS DIFFERENCE, more-1 S0mc 8.000 acres was aflame in over, lies the seed of an irrcmedi- Jefferson munists also had cut the route a grade basis at an average degree burns in an accident in her home yesterday, was in "poor" condition last night in St. Mary's hospital. Mrs. Cayan, who received slight hand burns in extinguishing the child's jknow how the fire started. She said jto leave no question of the need I for a pension system. Rather, he said, the question is "how best to meet this need." His personal choice: Expanding the present social security pro- gram, which Is financed on an in- IT3.1" insurance basis by employers and flaming clothing, did tr ension He said industry pension The government acknowledged i cents a pound for northern Wiscon-Carol had gone upstairs. A few minutes later she saw the child at the head of the stairs, her clothing These average prices, it explain- in the death of Dr. James District Attorney John Coleman tried to call as witnesses yesterday approximately The building was a two-story wooden structure, built by the Navy in 1941 at a cost of and used as a Navy barracks during the war. Injured Students Injured students listed as critical Lu Verne Morck, a hospital at-1 by the president's office were David tache, and Mrs. Phyllis Fraser, as- M. Clary, Buckner Ark., and John sistant to the doctor the state claims H- Larson contacted for the surgery. The defense objected on the grounds that anything they said would be a violation of the relationship between doctor and patient. At the time the prosecution sub- poenaed a number of Minnesota witnesses it was indicated they would be asked to testify about the alleged plastic surgery attempt. Judge Steinle said it wo'ild be better if the plastic surgeon himself were called as a witness. The state said the doctor might be subpoenaed later but doubted whether he would be permitted to appear. Yesterday's session was high- N. Starting about a. m. (C.S.T.) the fire spread quickly through tha sprawling wooden building. The stu- dents, aroused from sleep, made their way to the exists or jumped from first and second floor windows. Many former GJ.'s, unable to take the tune to dress or gather up be- longings jumped to the ground wearing only their GJ. shorts but clutching their first-of-the-month GJ. subsistence checks, received on- ly yesterday. Ex-Naval Dormitory The dormitory here was among several built at the start of the war when the Navy established a large air technical training base ad- lighted by the testimony of Larson's joining the campus. The establish- mother-in-law, Mrs. Sadie Krie-jment was taken over by the univer- wald, that she heard Larson say, "I am going to kill Dr. McLoone." He is charged with shooting so- cially prominent Dr. James McLoone to death on a highway near here November 14, 1947. Mrs. Kriewald said Larson made the statement to members of hislflve wings, family on February sity after the war. The dormitory normally houses 400 men. The president's office said about 340 were in the building. Origin of the fire is not known. It is believed to have started in the middle of the building, which has ____Levine, Oklahoma City. day his two-year-old son, Jimmy, was sleeping in the dormitory was buried. _ The boy the time, said that there was some confusion but no one was Girl's Life Detroit Laura Cassell, 20, probably owed her life today to tlie steady nerves of a gar- age mechanic and a policeman surgeons' skill. Laura's father, Jack Cassell, was driving her to her depart- ment store job yesterday. At an intersection where po- lice said the signal light had failed, the Cassell car collided with another. Laura was flung sideways against the steering wheel, The wheel splintered and Laura was impaled upon the gear-shift lever. It entered her chest through her left side. Police and Laura's father dared not remove the lever. But they called John Richer, mechanic at a nearby garage. As Laura gritted her teeth. Richer sawed the lever from its mounting while Patrolman George Mortimer held the girl. Then Laura, who is small and seems fragile, was rushed to Harper hospital. An hour-long operation fol- lowed. The broken gear-shift lever was removed after her chest was opened from her back. Dr. William Tuttle, who oper- ated, said Laura came through in "good" condition. She ought to be up and around in a day or two, he added. Her father suffered minor in- juries. The other driver was un- hurt. Dr. Tuttle was high in praise of Laura's original rescuers. "The credit for saving her." he said, "goes to the men at the scene who had sense enough not to pull the lever out of the girl's chest. That might have been fatal." chewing. Adolf Hitlor-nnd which prospect of a break Chiang Kai-shek. Chiang, whoj The average rates for the ed in war only because the free month-long' dry spell that made "'retired" in Li's favor last January, crop were 23.8 cents a pouna lor, world was wcuk. It is the struggle tindcr for that have sprung.has taken over command of Wisconsin ana u cents j thnt is being: wased against the So-'up tne Wnv from western Lou-i opera tions. He is expected to resume for northern Wisconsin. i viet Union. And in this titanic con-'isiana to the Georgia line. ithe presidency. Wisconsin tobacco te used mam- vulsion. the fitter-effects of the for cigar binding and scrap ond world have forced upon the United States the role of in- 't dispensable lender of the free Oil world. Finally, it is necessary to inquire: how you believe this country should exercise its leadership. confidently, with untiring effort, and with certainty of victory, would be the answer of these re- porters. Nothing is more- sure thanj victory, in this great strucrfrle be-j tween world and free, if this! nation v.'ill but bear its leader's part with boldness, with generosity, and with wisdom. Nothing is more certain thnn the power of our peo-j pie. if they are but told the honest j truth. I On the1 other hand, nothing more sure than defeat if this coun-j try falters, or weakens, or wanders; into self-indulgence. And nothing isj more certain to promote such folly i than any attempt, by political leaders or business leaders or or- dinary reporters or others havingi some responsibility, to gild harsh colors, and soften the grimj outlines of the facts of our time. In! short, if plain reporting of plain! facts makes you a "bandit of the] these reporters take it as a! title of honor, I ,000 of 1 2 3 4 5 6" 7 IS 19 20 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 Dates in White I Indicate Evenings [Stores Wifl Be Open than state officials, industrialists, bank- ers, politicians and workers filed j past the bier of former Governor] Julius P. Heil yesterday. Among those attending the fu- neral services at 2 p. m. today at the Scottish Rite cathedral were Governor Rennebohm, members of the state supreme court and legis- lators. The body lay in state at the Scot- tish Rite cathedral from noon until the services. The millionaire industrialist died Wednesday of a heart attack while on a hunting trip. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity: Fair and a little colder tonight and Sunday. Lowest in the city 30, 26 in the country. High Sunday 38. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 40; minimum, 25; noon, 40; precipitation, none; sun sets tonight at sun rises to- morrow at Additional weather on Page 12. der Dr. McLoone's care. Death was can not do the job alone, but can properly supplement so- This Naked Stairway is all that remains of the dormitory. More than 300 students Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.)