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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: November 23, 1949 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - November 23, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              SNOW TONIGHT, THURSDAY THERE'S NO STATIC ON KWNO-FM 97.5 MEGACYCLES VOLUME 49, NO. 237 WINONA, MINNESOTA, WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 23, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWENTY PAGES TODAY- Europe on 1910 Basis Proposed By Joseph and Stewart Alsop Secretary of State Dean Acheson and E.G.A. Chief Paul Hoffman returned from their respective trips to Europe, it has become Increasingly clear; that American policy in Europe revolves about, one magic word. I This word is "Integration." And it is about time to inquire what this word really means to Ache- son. Hoffman, and the other Amer- ican policy-makers. A groper through the fog which more and more obscures Ameri- can foreign policy soon discovers that "integration" is thr wrong word. To integrate, according to the dictionary, means "to unite or become united so as to form a more complete or perfect which would suggest that this country is trying to create a Unit- ed States of Europe overnight. In fact, what Acheson and Hoff- man arc trying to promote is noth- ing of the sort. The real objective, as one of the authors of the in- tegration project put it, is "to get back to 1910 by 1952." What the United States wants is a Europe whose internal trading relation- ships arc as close as possible to those which existed before the first world war. IN BRIEF, It is now the major aim of American policy in Europe to eliminate currency controls andi Free, Ordered Home New Bishop Named For Winona Diocese Eisenhower Ignores New Political Bids Devoting Full Time To University, Reporters Told By Jack Bell Washington General By Gordon Bolte The Most Rev. Edward A. Fitz- gerald, D.D., former auxiliary to the archbishop of Dubuque, Iowa, has been named by His Holiness, Pope Pius XH to succeed the Most Rev. Francis M. Kelly as bishop of the diocese of Winona, The appointment announced i in Washington late Tuesday night !by Archbishop Giovanni Cicognani, apostolic delegate to the TJnlted States exactly one week after for-JDwight D. Eisenhower's latest mal announcement was made of thumbs-down on a presidential can- didacy found about as many be- lievers as cynics in Washington today. Eisenhower told reporters at Cin- cinnati yesterday that he is devot- ing all of his time to his job as president of Columbia university and has no intention of seeking! political office. the that Wounded Robber, Accomplice Nabbed After Ettrick Break-in the appointment of the Most Rev. Leo Binz, D.D., as titular archbis- hop of Silyum and coadjutor with right of succession to Archbishop I Henry P. Rohlman of Dubuque. (Also announced at that time was the papal appointment of Bishop Kelly as titular bishop of Nasai. Archbishop-elect Binz, who re- turned to Winona Monday night after making his ad limina visit to the Vatican this fall, stated to- day that he will assume his_ new Politicians willing to take general at his word argued currency tunLiuis BUUJ at Dubuque January 3 export and import restrictions, m- The Most Rev. Edward A. that no date has been an. timately what is wanted is a real jnounced as yet for the arrival of Bishop Fitzgerald in Winona. Native of Cresco Eisenhower seems to be pursuing the course least likely to win him a nomination by repeating this economic union, with tariffs elim inated and a central banking sys tem and a common currency created. But all concerned agree) that for the forest-cable future this real "integration" Is no more thanj a distant dream. This apparently rather modest! but In fact enormously difficult project for turning the clock back to happier days is envisaged as taking place in a series of stages. In the first stage, there would be I three separate groups of "integrat- ed" and Italy, Bel- glum, Holland, and Luxembonrg, Russ Withdraw U.N. Nationalist Recognition New York Andrei and the three Scandinavian courr tries. The first five Nationaust delegation would then be Joined, to form "FrHalux." The Scandinavians would then probably be brought in to Pritolux. And finally, western priesthood July 25, 1916. He has also taken education courses at the University of Chi- cago and studied history at the University of Minnesota. He taught at Loras college from 1916 to 1941 and was named auxil- Y. Vishinsky announced today jary bishop of Dubuque and titu- Cynics contended that the gen- eral's words left him open to a i possible draft by the Republican A native of Cresco, Iowa, Bishop j national convention in 1952. They Fitzgerald received his bachelor of jsaid such a draft movement might arts degree at Loras college by leaps and bounds, for in-j IDubuque and from 1913 to if G.O.P. candidates attended the Grand seminary in j fare so well in the 1950 congression- Montreal and was ordained to the Russia no longer recognizes the liar bishop of Cantanus August 21, Germany would be added, to make one big, relatively free trading area in Western Europe. the spokesman for China in the United Nations. This means that the Soviet Un ion will not consider the Chiang Kai-shek regime as a proper mem- ber of the security council, where BRITAIN (to the great relief of shares the right of Veto the British leaders) is not being pressed to become an active par- ticipant In this Acheson-Hoffman project. But while they were in Last night's papal announcement was the first appointment of a bis- hop for the Winona diocese since Bishop Kelly was selected for the office more than two decades ago. Famed as an educator, scholar and. administrator, Bishop Kelly served as vice-rector of ,St. Mary's the Other, big the United States, Britain and France. Recently Yugoslavia was elect- ed to the security council, over al races. Democrats Watch Byrnes While this speculation occupied the Republican camp, Democrats wondered whether James F. Byrnes might be laying the ground work for an anti-Truman organiza- tion with his attacks on the Pres- ident's "fair deal." Some officials on the administra- tion's side repeated reports that a movement may be under way to form such a group. As a former secretary of state in the Truman cabinet and a form- er Supreme court justice, Brynes' attacks on what he calls the "so- cialistic programs" of the Presi-] dent are regarded here as bearing Lester Dick, Ettrick Tavern Operator, reconstructs his shooting ol window. Republican-Herald photos a burglar from a, second-story Europe Acheson and Hoffman po- litely but firmly urged British For- In November of 1927, Bishop eign Secretary Ernest Bevln lt takes lts geat m assumed the post of bis- college from 1918 to 1925 and weight than the same words March 22, 192S was named titulariuttered by Republicans, bishop of Mylasa and auxiliary bis-j Byrnes, whose break with Tru- bop of Winona. Following thejman has never been publicly ex- Russian protests, but Yugoslavia death of Bishop Patrick E. plained, has hinted that he might burglar was injured a few minutes Chancellor of the Exchequer Sir Stafford Crlpps to give the scheme "encouragement and Be- and Cripps rather reluctantly agreed. The chief British pelplng- tlon is expected to be firm military and political commitments (Continued on 11, Column 5.) ALSOPS The Soviet Union previously broke diplomatic relations with the Chiang regime and accorded rec- ognition to the communist regime This Is a 25-Cent Week Since no paper will be pub- lished tomorrow. Thanksgiving day, The Republican-Herald carriers will collect for only five davs or 25 cents this weekend WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity: Mostly cloudy and rather cold tonight hop of Winona. Former St. Mary's Instructor Bishop Kelly was born in Yuca- tan, Minn., November 15, 1886 and attended St. Thomas college in St. be a candidate for governor of South Carolina. However, some of his friends are speculating that Byrnes might get out of the field at the last moment. to leave the way open for his long-j By Adolph Bremer Ettrick, Wis. Burglary of ani Ettrick tavern was thwarted here early today when Lester Dick, 61- year-old co-operator, pointed his 12- gauge shotgun out of the second- story bedroom and let the burglars have it. He got one of them In the leg, with some 35 pellets, and the other later when their car rolled off the road in the escape attempt. Now they're both in the Whitehall Community hospital, under guard by Trempealeau County Sheriff Charles Keilholtz and deputies. Low tonight 24, high Thursday jter having been ordained to the near freezing point. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations hours ending at 12 m. today: Paul before entering St. Paul's j ald to make the race, seminary. He continued his studies j Situation In South at the Catholic University of Northj Byrnes. speech to the southern America at Washington, C., governor's conference was credited and the North American college iu part for the adoption yesterday and Urban college of the Propa- by that group of a resolution op- ganda, both in Rome. posing government regulation of in- He received a doctorate and caUlng for restor- sovereignty. time friend and law partner, Don- On hospital records they're listed with snow tonight and Thursday theology-In Rome in 1913 af- ation Qf priesthood there the previous year, I Upon his return to the United f... oil States, be served on the faculty from 1912 to of !28; precipitation, none; sun sets to-i I night at sun rises tomorrow at; The former coadjutor of the dio- The governors also elected Gov- ernor J, Strom Thurmond of South Carolina, who headed the states rights ticket in last year's presi- dential election, as the new head of their group. Thurmond is looked upon as a likely candidate against Senator Ol- Ernest Culver, 32, of Madison, injured in the accident. He was being X-rayed for chest in- juries. Leslie R. McDaniels, 34, of Sheboygan, shot by Dick. District Attorney John Quinn said this noon, after lengthy inter- rogation of the two men, that war- rants would be issued today charg- Dcputy Sheriff Albert Severson, left, and Lester Dick, stand by the front door of the Beirne tavern. The hole was sawed by the burglar. ing each one of the men with particularly is quite proud I crime authorities to ascertain their "breaking and entering at night- Lf ljis ta hls -prof ession.'! criminal records, if any. time.' However, Mr. Quinn added, they both deny any part in the Ettrick affair. "They don't openly admit any- iHe admits making his living at it." "McDaniels admits serving time in the pen, and he says that Culver has, too." Culver and McDaniels were under fire from two guns as soon as they were surprised In their burglary (Continued on Fate X, Column 4.) Chinese Reds Rule Consul Beat Workers Prison Sentences For Diplomat, Aides Suspended Washinjrton Angus Ward, the American consul general at (Mukden, has been released from jail by the Chinese communists and ordered out of the country. The communists also released lour consulate aides who were jailed with Ward October 24 on what the State department called "trumped up" charges of beating and insulting two Chinese in a wage dispute. The department announced today that it tod received word of the releases from Ward himself. It was the first direct word from the con- sul general in a month. In winding up what the depart- ment has denounced as their "bar- baric" treatment of Ward, the com- munists gave him a trial before a "people's court." Tills court found them all guilty and meted out varying prison sen- tences. Then the sentences were commuted to deportation. Message Received Ward, 56-year-old veteran diplo- mat, made his report In a telephone conversation with American Consul 'General O. Edmund Clubb at Pei- iping. Clubb rushed the information I to Washington, I Ward said the other four men and he were "up and about." The State department instructed Clubb to tell Ward "that he and ois entire staff are to deport from Mukden forthwith." The four jailed with Ward Ealph KeHberg, of Rochester, N. Y.. a foreign service clerk; Shiro Tat- suml, a mechanic, and two Euro- pean employes of the consulate. Franco Cicogna. and Alfred Krlstan. Behberg and Tatsuml are American citizens. There was no explanation here as to what kind of transportation from (Mukden might be given the con- sulate staff. On previous occasions the communists had promised to take the consulate personnel out of (Mukden but never made good their promises. 'Break' Expected American officials had hopefully looked for some "break" In the'case since Secretary of State Acheson's move last week for concerted pres- sure by 30 nations on the commu- nists. Acheson asked the 30 nations to express their concern to the I Chinese communists. Official hopes for their early re- lease were based on (1) Prece- dents In communist eastern Eur- ope where American officials and others have been charged with such crimes as spying and then expelled and (2) The belief that the Chinese communists have won all the domestic propaganda ad- vantages they can hope for. They have dramatized their point that Americans are discredited backers of the defeated nationalists and can look for no special privileges from all si their receiving hv on 17. on 17, uomnjn z.j next Qutan Me- was contacting state ETTRICK' from tha new red "regime. Saw Five Children Perish in Flames eving Father Utters Prayer of Thanksgiving Al Olson nuranrt. Wis. Grief and shuck were wruten on his face, bu: John K'-Tg was able1 to ut- ter :i prayer of I! was only n low hours after a farm fire near here Tuesday morning in which Jive children wove burned to death, Hi.s and .sincere-. It was for the safety of his wife arid his three sons who w.ere not in the frame dwelling leveled by flames. And it was for the 50-50 chance to live given his nine- year-old son, Harry, who leap- ed or was thrown from an up- stairs window. "Had the fire broken out about two hours earlier, when we were all still I guess we'd most likely not be here talking to you he said grimly. His was a story of anguish and desperation; it was told in faltering it reflected all the torment of parents forced to stand help- lessly by as flames engulfed their loved ones. "I saw our 19 year old Tragedy Is Mirrored In The Faces Of Mr. and Mrs. John Berg and several of their children follow- ing yesterday's flash fire near Mondovi. Still suffering from the shock when the above picture was taken at noon Tuesday are, from left to right, Lois, Benny, Mrs. Berg, Mr. Berg, Russell and Roger. The latter two boys had driven their older brother, Ben, to work and returned to discover the house engulfed in flames. Kepublican-Herald photos daughter, Maxine. leaning out of the Berg ed. "Smoke was pouring from behind her. .the room was red with fire. Hoping to save her. Berg climbed a ladder to the window and grabbed his daughter. "She was unconscious when I took her in my arms and struggled to lift her over the sill. Then the smoke got too much for me. "I had to let ehe slipped back into the burning room. It was the last I saw of her. By the time I got some air in my lungs and was about to go up the ladder again, it was burning too. Wait and Watch "All I could do then was wait Berg added sad- ly. Just once was there cause for' hope. That was when the badly burned body of nine- year-old Harry was found ly- ing on the ground below a sec- ond story window. Berg and his wife through! perhaps other children trapped in the burning house had man- ged to leap from the dwelling. But it was a futile hope. When the heat and flames subsided, and only a pile of twisted debris and smouldering rubbish remained of the 49- year old house the charred bodies of the five children were found. According to Berg, the bod- (Continned on Page 17, Column 3.) FIRE Charred Metal Bedstands Stand Out In The Smoldering Ruins of the John Berg farm home near Mondovi, Wis., following the fire which claimed the lives of four Berg children and a granddaughter early Tuesday morning. A garage and bam shown at the rear of the picture escaped the fury of the fire, as winds blew burning embers the opposite direction. The entire two-story frame structure was leveled in about 15 to 20 minutes, Berg said. It was believed that an oil stove on the first floor exploded, setting the house ablaze while the parents were milking In the barn. The children, were trapped, one son Jumped or was ttoown to safety.   

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