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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - November 21, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              COLDER TONIGHT, TUESDAY FAIR VOLUME 49, NO. 235 WINONA, MINNESOTA, MONDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 21, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY THERE'S NO STATIC ON KWNO-FM 97.5 MEGACYCLES TWENTY-FOUR PAGES Young Rochester Hunter Slain 300 County School Officers Set for Reorganization Vote TODAY- Economies Peril U. S. Defenses By Joseph and Stewart AIsop American dis- armament program entered a new stage last week, with the reduction, of nava! aviation by 35 squadrons, j The bland announcement by the Defense department emphasized j the resulting economies. No men-j tion was made of the more impor-j tant fact, that wartime control ofj the Mediterranean has probably row been cast away. This sacrifice upon the twin al- tars of business-as-usual and po-j litlcal expediency in turn involves! another, even deeper issue, which! the Defense department also signal-! ly failed to discuss. Having cast! away the chance to hold the iterranean, we may also have dis- astrously reduced the value of our! strategic air arm. Since present de-j fense planning allots so great a role to strategic air power, this surely might have been explained, at least In passing. THE EFFECTS of these latest economies are easily demonstrat- ed. Although most people assume that the strategic air arm is en- tirely composed of "intercontin- ental" B-36s, ten of the fourteen strategic air groups are actually equipped with planes of much less- er B-29s and B-50s at present. In order to attack tar- gets within the Russian land mass, these ten strategic air groups mus operate from overseas bases. As everyone knows by now, B-2E and B-50 groups have been station ed at British bases ever since the peak moment of International ten sion. In 1947. Very few people un derstand, however, that these Brit ish bases meet only about one-thirc of the total requirement. This Is because only the most westerly of the Soviet industrial centers are within reasonable range from air fields in Britain.. Owing to the wartime and post- war transfers of Soviet industry the most Important target systems are now in the Urals and beyonc the Urals. In order to reach anc hit these distant vital centers, It is necessary to have bases in North Africa, the Middle East, and per- haps even northern India. Without such bases, the strategic air arm cannot do Its assigned task, either now or In the future. For It must be understood that the already ob- solescent B-29S and B-50s will be replaced with B-47 jet bombers of equal range. If our disarmament program allows them to be re- placed at all. THE REQUIREMENT for North African and Middle Eastern bases Inevitably establishes a secondary requirement, for wartime control j of the Mediterranean. For if the Mediterranean is totally undefend- ed any bases in the Middle East or'North Africa will obviously be untenable. The bases we need are freely available. Our own Air Force is al-j demands that the United States use force ready using Tripoli and Dahran injagainst the Chinese communists drew only an official silence at the Arabia. The .fcsri 4- %Un department today. And it is understood on the oest authority that the Egyptian govern- Hokah Woman Hurt in Auto Mishap Dies Mrs. Warnecke Succumbs at Rochester Hospital Survey Committee Proposed, Friends Group Represented By Gordon Holte The possibility of a sharp fight over the controversial rural school district reorganization proposal be- gan to shape up this afternoon Hokah woman, critically K in a traffic mishap near here tion of whether or not a school re- a week ago, died at St. Marys hos- organization survey committee willipital here today at a. in. be established in Winona county, j she was Mrs. William Warnecke, Rochester, Minn. A 300 school officers from throughout pital as a result of the highway 14 He has a the county were present when the i collision November 12. annual meeting of county school-1 fractured neck, men opened at the Masonic temple! Mrs. Warnecke died somewhat un- this morning. jexpectedly. Her son, Sergeant Henry, The auditorium was filled to here from his station in Chicago ing capacity and more than a dozen late-comers were standing at the rear of the room during the two- hour for the weekend, but left to resume his duties late Sunday afternoon. Mrs. Warnecke had a fractured David Pearson, 37, of Foreston, Minn., escaped death when his automobile skidded through a guard rail on a bridge over the Min- neapolis St. Louis railroad tracks and plunged 35 feet to tha tracks at Minneapolis today. Pearson, covered with a blanket, still was pinned In the wreckage when this picture was taken. He suf- fered a severe head Injury. (A.P. WIrephoto to The Republican- Herald.) Force Ursed to Obtain Release of U. S. Consul The demands are prompted by the imprisonment at Mukden of an ment long ago intimated to Admlr- American consul, Angus Ward. He and four members of his staff have al Richard Conolly, commander lnibeen since October 24, on the Eastern Atlantic and harges ol having beaten a Chinese'mally that they doubted a U. S. ranean, that there would be no Ihlnrkarie would brine the commu- ranean Jcctlon to the establishment of employe. (blockade would Jbring the cornmu- Today the United States ed to 30 nations, including to communist China sia, to Intervene with the Chinese fairly effectively, communists in behalf of the George N. Craig, prisoned American consul general.'mander of...... American air bases on Egyptaln soil. In short, the only difficulty is to hold the needed bases, once they are secured and made ready. For this purpose, the late Secre- tary of Defense, James V. Forres- the maintenance of. Secretary Acheson sent out m a wt.Bliellu swltcluclil, ready aircraft carriers in.his Friday asking the otheriUnited States stands "ridiculed be ion, also a weekend statement that the matter of the and added: representatives from the state de- partment of education, Eugene Meyer and W. E. Hanson, explained the provisions of the school re- organization law. Among the persons attending this morning's meeting was J. P. Craw- ford, a leader in the Winona county unit of the Friends of the Rural Schools organization which has long voiced opposition to the reorganiza- tion, movement. Campaign Staged Several officials at this morning's opening session commented that the Friends have waged an active cam- paign throughout the county-in re- cent weeks to stimulate interest In today's meeting and this is believed to have been a factor in today's as the largest realized for an annual meeting of school officers. Jestus explained that county comprises 116 of them common districts and the other three the districts of the city tof Winona, Lewiston and St. Charles that there are a total of 354 school board members In the coun- ty. This would Indicate that over (Continued on Page 21, Column 6.) SCHOOLS injuries. She suffered those when she was thrown onto the pavement in the near head-on collision. Funeral arrangements are incom- plete. The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Woolley, she was born in Hokah July 21, 1888. Survivors are her husband; two sons, Sergeant Henry, Chicago, and Robert, La Crosse; one daughter, Mrs. Harold Hanson, Seattle, Wash.; three sisters, Mrs. Cleveland Melis- sia) Vix, Houston; Mrs. Henrietta Meinzer, Winona, and Mrs. Vernor Fire Damages Farm House Rifle Shot In Cornfield Accidental Heavy Collision Tolls Push Fatal Mishaps Higher Scenes Like This are commonplace at the bleacher entrance of a World series ball this one is outside the Metropolitan Opera House at New York city this morning. The Met opens to- night for the 65th season, and these early-birds have been waiting in line all night. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) New through the chilly night and this morning, a line Calfernia) St. Mary, _ Caledonia; LOVGFS AH Night for Met Tickets 28 Children Killed in Oslo Plane Crash Oslo, Norway Land, sea By The Associated Press A Rochester, Minn., farm youth and four Wisconsin hunters were killed in firearm accidents over the weekend. Four other Badger hunt- ers died of heart attacks. Heavy traffic death tolls In both Wisconsin and Minnesota added to the list of fatalities. Homer Hargrove, 18-year-old .Ro- chester farm hand, was killed Sat- urday when a rifle in the hands of a companion went off as they went through a cornfield near Ro- chester, Minn. Dr. W. O. Wellner, Olmsted county coroner, swore in a jury but did not announce the date for an inquest. 8 Wisconsin Victims The Wisconsin dead from gua- 'fire: Mrs. Elizabeth Petcrman, 21, Route 3, Black River (Sheboygan Paul Jerome Nikolai, 16, McMil- lan (Marathon Kenneth Winters, 19, Fond du Lac. Walter Blindauer, 47, Route I. Sheboygan. The dead from heart attacks: Arnin Schroeder, 53, Fond du Lac. Frank Fox, 44, Shullsburg. Donald Jqnes, 39, Tomahawk. Mrs. Peterman was visiting in n Marinette county farm house near Crivitz with her husband and child yesterday when a hunter's bullet crashed through the wall of the house and struck her in the left breast. Sheriff Donald John said the shot was fired by John Dalluge, of early-birds stood outside the Metropolitan Opera House to buy stand- 133, r0ute 1, Crivitz. ing room tickets for tonight's opening of the Met's 65th season. All seats for the performance were sold in advance, and those in line wnea a bullet pierced his heart and air 'teams pressed an inten- ;ine would hold their places for sive hunt today for a missing feared to have carried 35 persons, Holder of first place in line had Including 28 undernourished Jewish arrived Saturday night. She Is sought standee tickets which go on sale a half-hour before curtain time. Men and women in the line wrap-1 ped heavy coats, scarfs and blan- kets around themselves, and took time out occasionally for coffee and! food In drug stores and restaurants during the night. Several left for some the assurance that others In the Nikolai was killed yesterday refugee children, to a flaming death in the tangled forests of southern Norway. The plane, with the 28 children, three nurses and four crewmen aboard, last was heard from by tewiston, ft{ about 5 p.m. ]ast night as smoke and water damage was neared Oslo's Fornebu airport, ported at noon today at the farm! goon afterward a sharp flash, fol- home of the George and Ed Beach by an explosion, was report' families at Enterprise. Neighbors near Gjersjoen a miles around flocked to the Beach !southeast of Oslo, farm to help when an alarm was) jjome guards and police, along Netted In Club Robbery At Minneapolis Minneapolis Five masked Miss Dash a Paretsky of Jackson Heights, Queens, New York, who has attended seven consecutive opening nights at the Met. She went home early to rest, and was to re- turn later in the day. The Metropolitan Opera associa- tion, weary of the circus stunts i jewelry early Sunday. while he was hunting five miles of Fittsville In Wood county. Winters was killed when the rifle of a 14-year-old companion dis- charged as the two youths walked along a road on the west end of Stone lake in Vilas county. Blindauer was shot shortly beforo noon Saturday In Fenctf township. Florence county. He died several hours later at a Crystal Fulls, Mich., hospital. A coroner's jury ruled at an Inquest yesterday that he died of a shot fired by an un- known hunter. Heart Attack Victim Jones, a Tomahawk alderman men robbed a1 dozen patrons of the land owner of an auto sales agency Greek dub, 916 Hennepln avenue of nearly in cash, checks andu collapsed and died wnile hunting staged at some openings by a small mile i proportion of exhibitionists in the audience, said yesterday: sent out shortly before noon. I with hundreds of volunteer search- Enterprise is about two and comDed the dense forests and reglon swamps. 'rhe piane's owners, Aerc Hol- half miles south of here. The Lewis-; ton fire department was called toj the blaze and pumped water said at The Hague the craft Rush creek to extinguish the fire. jwas considered lost. The fire was discovered by two j Another Dutch DC-3, sister ship of neighbors who_were driving by. ]ost craftj ianded safely today at when he made his great effort in; 1948 to persuade President Truman governments as a to give us real defense. The 16 car-lgency" to express to the riers. it must be understood, authorities at Peiping the! to be paid for within ".he total the miling of Ward e n vhlph o wiiu iiau uuo utrcn tvwtwc me ijit. ay of S 6.9 billions v.hlch mernbers of his staff. jsociates must be released unharmed! Burns turned to the alarm at youngsters r tal uiged the President Senator Know'.and (R.-'by an early specified date, or m. An the funuture 12 vearl BESinKS PROVIDING a wl11 be. dispatched to obtainjout by Damage w Bums and James Hruska wiff 27 otter when thev saw smoke pouring i the others en periormance win oe carriea Three came in the front door and of Tomahawk. at Willow Lake, 20 miles northwest went straight to the back room where the 12 men were. They ord- Schroeder and Fox died on Sat- urday of the same cause. Schroeder collapsed after a companion bag- "Much of the glitter generally collapsed alter a companion oag- sociated with the first night audi- ered tnelr vlctlms to face the a deer near Clearwater lake ence will be secondary to that onjand let two more gunmen In the in Oneida county; and Fox_suc- the stage this year." back door. cumbed while hunting near Black River Falls. night's performance of Richard Strauss' "Der Rosenkavalier." forced their victims, four aLackerman. BO. Antigo. a time, to take off their pants and The entire audience will be trJtum the inside largest in the Met's history, seached them individually for ...__________in j T__; onri vnlna.nsps. Wls., died Saturday afternoon while hunting in Langlade county, six miles west'of Antigo. The wounded reported in serious a Formosa news carried six to 12 years' nad been S0 nourished that they had was esti- imated at most of it to the i >1A; j ultii matCU HD IllUbb Ui JU LU LilC mum of earner fviation liJ. tne.ference that he had radioed Presi- state department has. been comer of the house, the porch Pacific, flue! allowing __ _ _ _ under repair, the Forrestal plansj to nut carriers into the. been threatened with tuberculosis. All 55 children were to have had six opening-night Last carried on a smaller network. advice on the and. between the flooring lance will be carried ana valuables. condition Theodore Kon- M Af to American Broadcasting Company When it was over, the five backed Q36 f Amherst Juncuon; Rob- North Africa to to Ie in New out the rear door Jert Haecker, 24, of Milwaukee; and Scandinavia. Baitlmore> Washmg- Largest apparently Peppleri 25? Routc lp and'Chicago. vassn. so i (Mountain, Mich. lost i.buu. j Those wounded but not reported believed to 'be those who Griffin, 53, Mather; Arnold Famous Bar, 405 East Lake j jacksoDi 20, Sparta: M.irlcne months of rest and rehabilitation! This season will be the last of the; Orient. n force considered possible to keep Mediterranean open from Gibraltar! There was no to Suez, and to hold the African shore. But with the immensely re-J duced carrier force that will result i from the economies of Secretary, of Defense Louis Johnson, nothing j of the sort will be conceivably pos- sible. H is tragic that Adn'.iral Arthur W. Rndford did not present his; cnse Rpflinst Secretary Johnson in these terms, instead of making a- blunderbuss attru-k on the whole; idea of a strategic sir arm, and the Chinese communist coast if'situation generally. General Georgeithe second story. to release c. Marshall, former secretary ofj Defective wiring is believed to .juring the state; Harold Stassen. president been the cause. the University of Pennsylvania, and! Mr. and Mrs. Beach were taken official comment John D. Rockefeller, m, the home of a neighbor, Howard rpnir T-Kit week Sfate de- among a group of 25 American lead- jEvery. where they were receiving in repiv. jja.1, infvv--'ers who have been called in. 'treatment for shock this afternoon. the entire dcfer.se the ioint chiefs of staff. No doubt, the case has just beon forcibly pre- sented to Secretary Johnson by Ad- miral Forrest Sherman, who is ac- tually proving the most effective advocate the Navy has had since the war. But presentations within the Defense department do not remedy the inherent vice of the present situa'ion. This vice is that the security of Britain's Montgomery to Meet U. S. Defense Chiefs in Tour BV Don Whitchead and Rush Cowan 'chiefs of staff; General Joseph L., later as commander of the 21st Army in Scandinavia before traveling on Johnson's 15-year tenure as to Israel. general manager. Rudolph Bing, his successor, will be in the audi- "Der Rosenkavalier" was chosen (for the opening night before! i Strauss' death last September, but! I Johnson said the performance will; constitute a memorial tribute ithe composer. j Wausan. Wis. A sheriff's Eleanor Steber, the first Ameri-j 3 Wausau Escapees Captured vfi __ ____ hunch roused'three jailbrelkers from (can singer to assume the role of the I a peaceful sleep in a hideout shack j Metropolitan, will sing the Mar-i and put them back in the Marathon ischallin for the first time here.1 county jail. !Rise Stevens, as Octavian. will be The three fled yesterday and the principals tonight. away in a stolen green taxicab. Sheriff Carl Mueller returned March 26. from a hunting trip and took charge j The 13-week season will close (Editor's note: WhiUhead mas an Associated Press tear corre- spondent during World War II and accompanied Montgomery's Eighth Army on its famous march from El Alamein into Tunisia. Later he ices Montgomery in the drive across Europe. Miss Coimr. likeicise icas an war correspondent, seeing extensive service.) Collins. Army chief of staff, and'group under Eisenhower. In all chase "He'recalled a shack! other military and diplomatic lead-lthem, Monty never had'his defenses'near Medfoid one of the fugitives (broken by the Germans. Monty already has announced he] Montgomery visited the United will "talk defense with anyone whojstates in 1946 as chief of the Brit- had used previously, picked up Ta; i lor County Sheriff Al Zastrow and! found the three sleeping. listen." There is no doubt imperial general staff. That was Authorities identified the men as; !military men will be ready to fOrmai military visit and his Pau1' 21- Milwaukee, charged !ten. Montgomery is now through a stiff nir.e-daviwitn auto theft; Calvin van 35 Twin Cities Holdups Solved street, of on August 10. Supreme Court Throws Out Eisler Appeal Strand, 15, New Lisbon; John A. Korn, 50, Bangor; John Simmons, La Crosse; Ronald Neerdae'.s, 16, Green Bay; Galen Hollister, Strum; James Sweltzer, 59, Wau- watosa; George Watson. 28, Hills- boro; Charles Julson, 18, Verona; Kenneth Jordan, 35, rural Sparta; Arthur Hensley, 56, Milwaukee; Frank Bartlett, St. Cloud; and Gil- bert Ninnemann, 17, Wausau. Gustave Brenner, 40, of Oconto Falls was wounded near Stiles yesterday when he was shot Jin the thigh by another hunter, Marvin Krueger, 17, of Gillett. Washington The himself in the iiand when his court today tossed out an appeal by j shotgun discharged as he picked Gerhart Eisler, the communist lead- it up. er who jumped bail and fled the Traffic accident victims in Min- country while the justices were con- nesota over the weekend included: sidenng his case. Mrs- W. Kessling Route 2, Wayzata. Deputy sheriffs said T Her car crashed headon into an ap- Congress! w- polis Police said1 case earlier this year. But he stowed theft: Calvin van return to Minneapolis of on a Polish ship last May and of theJWestern union defense_ am-; workout of inspecting military in-21. Wausau, serving a paul mfin arrested to Engiand) and then to Ger- he made two term, and Walter w. aenn, T rlparprl -nn'mam-. before a decision was court frdm a contempt conviction. He sat in the court, H chamber while lawyers debated his (Continued on Page _21._ Column 5.) machine after sideswip- H through a stiff nir.e-dayi f inspecting military m, has _been working Some days he made two months on plans for Europe's de-1 or more speeches. fense. Iorm g the 1'nitcd States, and the safety] of free world, are being daily] _ impaired; yet smart talk of Marshai viscount ononiy is nil the explanation we grj. qf arrives in the Unit- m" fnr ense congress has vot-- And it is on these plans Monty 43, Wausau, awaiting trial forgery charge Police said the men picked a lock Bluffs, five Twin Cities cleared up many, FATALITIES WEATHER heli address Nationai the Overseas Writers the War college, and the Eng. The three areWilUam Kogan, is being done to us. Aid to Germany FEDERAL FORECASTS vicinity: Clearing with lowest near 10 in the country. ash-Speaking union. jthe time. I with the holdup of Fitz's Bar, taken off the docket, but tech- perature in the afternoon; high- In the capital he will stay at the! Walter Christenson, a Wausau Hennepin avenue, of :nically remained before the court. Igjt 44. _ LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 top-ranking military UMJ ___ _____f men. driver, said he picked up a fare Tuesday' Recently, Solicitor General Philip! On the record, the little to hold Europe against any at-lbassador. Sir Oliver Franks, General a- m- at. a Schofield. Wis., Detective Charles WetheriU Perlman suggested that the whole! waiTior with the famous black beret comes to this country as the guest military men believe thej General Bradley has invited other men got mto the union couldn't have of officers who were Mont- Hamburg Since the fc November 29 before the of the to New better man for the job than the gomery's comrades in the war, pub- f ecdinT and maintenaTe of the! visitinK u- s- i spartan, precise little son of Britain. Ushers of local newspapers and oth- Gcrmans ar- official British report' But during his 12-day trip he will His campaigns in World War nier Washingtonians to a stag lunch- ci.'The report said that Bri--'visit with General Eisenhower, his were studies in painfully at his Fort Myer quarters. tick from Russia and her satellites !Morgan and General Collins will to. a telephone call Hejtne had confessed that hold-i business be thrown out of courtjhours ending at 12 m. Sunday: Fitted for Job his hosts at dinners. Matthews said he drove the'perlman noted that Eisler has tak-l Maximum, 58; minimum, 30: i rlllCTJ AUL JVU Ij.o _f Wausau and 1----li _ .__ noon, that point. .escape car on that occasion but hadjen public (Jffice in the Soviet zone precipitation, snow flurries. participated in rio other holdups. Germany and shows no signs of ever Official observations for the 24 WetheriU said Kogan and Stran- returning here. He urged that thejhours ending at 12 m, today: admitted holding up a tavern I appeal which had been granted Eis-! Maximum, 34; minimum, 22; noon, out of town, one man'drew a gun: and a dairy store in Minneapolis ,ler should now be finally tain has spent pounds since 1945. saiu UIBL au-.w _____ _________________---------- 'and forced him to turn onto a side .October 31 getting total loot of over in World War IT; General Omarl planning first as commander ofj in New York Monty will get tc-lroad. There they robbed him andjand holding up two taverns in St. precipitation, .02; sets to- iN. Bradley, chairman of the famed British Eighth Army andJgether with General Eisenhower. Idrove off in his cab. Paul on November 12. The court today took this advicejnight at sun rises tomorrow at and dismissed Eisler's case with brief order. (additional Weather on Page'21.)   

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