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Winona Republican Herald: Tuesday, November 8, 1949 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - November 8, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              FAIR TONIGHT, RAIN WEDNESDAY SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY CHEST VOLUME 49, NO. 224 WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 8, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY EIGHTEEN PAGES rs. Larson's Testimony Outlawe Start of Eviction Action Against Vets Set Nov. 15 The city council last night delayed but did not sidestep the eviction of delinquent, veterans in the city's 40-unit housing project. It postponed until November 15 the initiation of eviction action against the delinquent tenants of the apartments. As of yesterday, according to a written report of City Treasurer Otto P. Pietsch, nine were delinquent forj--------------------------------------------- more than one month. The council also instructed CKynumcane Waning Attorney S. D. J. Bruski to start i Heavy Voting Reported in N. Y. Election Truman's 'Fair Deal' Main Issue In Senate Race a judgment action, in municipal! court, against one veteran whoj moved out of an apartment lastj week without paying in de- linquent rent. As of yesterday afternoon, one! veteran family was delinquent five; months, one one a half months, six two months and one three months. The council itself is delinquent. When It discussed applying to the federal Public Housing adminlstra tion for acquiring ownership of the project, the city attorney advised the aldermen that the city will be required to pay all delinquent rents before ownership is transferred. Title to the project is held by the federal government, and the city remits all but a month, after maintenance to the federal government. A law of the last session of Con- gress permits cities to apply for ownership. When the project was built im- mediately after the war, the city Invested nearly in it for sewage and water mains and other Items. Last night the council also in- formally discussed transferring management of the project to the Housing Redevelopment author- ity with a view of providing rev enue for the authority after owner, ship Is acquired by the city. The council has informally agreed to that transfer. Anchorage, Alaska A hurricane that swept across the Aleutian chain with fusts up to 175 miles an hour was re- ported blowing itself out today. The Weather bureau said the storm had moved into Bristol Bay and wind velocities had dropped to around 35 miles an hour. Its eastward path is across the northern gulf of Alaska. Hardest hit yesterday was TJnmak island, near the tip of the Alaskan peninsula. It was there that the hurricane reach- ed its peak of 175 M.P.H. A report from the island said property damage was light and j there were no Injuries. FPC to Consider New York State's Seaway Proposal by the Rodriguez Gets Award For Slavery Gaylord, Minn. A district court jury today awarded Francisco Rodriguez for back wages and punitive damages in his suit charg-j ing that George Stark, Gibbon! By Henry Leader Albany, the eyes of the nation on the outcome, New York state voters decide today the sizzling Senate contest betv.'een Re- publican John Foster Dulles and Democrat H. Lehman. President Truman's "Fair Deal" 'was the main issue of the cam- jpaign. The result was awaited I across the country as an indicator j of satisfaction or unrest with the i national administration's domestic j policies and a portent of the 1950 j congressional elections. Interest in the race rose to a fever pitch, presaging an. "off- year" record turnout of voters. A forecast of sunny, mild weath- er bolstered Republican hopes of a Elections At-a-Glance New Albert E. Driscoll (R.) vs. Elmer H. Wcne (D.) for a four-year term as governor; vet- erans' bonus, (Polls close 7 p. m. Senator John S. Battle (D.) vs. Walter John- son (R.) for governor; poll tax repeal amendment. California Three cornered race for U. S. representative from the 5th (San Francisco) district. tax repeal pro- posal. Pennsylvania veterans' bonus. Sub Launches Buzz By Leif Erickson Aboard U.S.S. Spangler off Hawaii A submarine- launched buzz bomb zoomed over a long line of 35 Navy ships yesterday and apparent- ly escaped a hit from anti- aircraft guns. The missile was assisted by a rocket in its takeoff from, deck of the submarine Car- bonero. Known in Navy par- lance as a loon, the missile was launched 20 miles behind 35 ships strung out over a 21- mile course. It sped 400 500 miles an hour over its control- led course and plunged into the sea 80 miles from where it was launched. A close look at the loon launching showed the navy's missile development has reach- ed a stage where submarines can carry a number of jet weapons in normal underseas ope.-atlons. Loon wings are de- tachable and the missile and its jet engine when broken down probably would occupy the same space area in a subma- rine as three torpedoes. The missile launching ramps are made of a light steel frame- work easily taken down and stowed. The most impressive thing in yesterday's demonstration was the scant launching ramp re- quired to get the bomb into the air with a rocket. After the loon's jet engine warms up the rocket jumps the loon into the air and at- tains a speed sufficient to de- velop jet compressive power. Not only did the loon appar- ently escape ack ack hits but It1 evidentally was not inter- cepted by fighters from the carriers Valley Forge and Box- er. The missile is the same as the German V-l that gave Lon- don so much trouble late ia the war. British gunners and air- men shot down a high per- centage of them in the latter days of the war. The loon's fuel range is re- ported to be between 100 and 200 miles, which would make it a good weapon in the event of war with a country with a sea approach. However, good weather is needed to get them into the air from a submarine. One fell into the sea 500 yards from the submarine Cusk from which it was launched yester- day. A rough sea and a 25- knot wind made its launching difficult. Is 'Improper Judge Petitioned To Set Aside Divorce Findings Here Are A Few Of The Pupils in Winona schools who were given the tuberculosis test today. FirstJ, sixth, ninth and 12th graders were given the Mantoux test by the staff of the Wabasha sanatorium. This photo was taken at Washington-Kosciusko school and shows Dr. E. C. Bayley administering the test to first grade pupils. Children, from left, are Louise Bauer, Donna Jean Gaulke, Patty Bilder, Beverly Husman, Lee Chadbourne and Connie Kohner. Republican-Herald photo seven and a hall years. a TO_ The jury returned its verdict 4-25 p. m. f opened at and wlu close at 7 pm Czechs Admit Russians Using Uranium Mines General Motors to Pay Dividend Prague, Czechoslovakia Rodriguez sued for Stark! this the possible effect IPremier Zapotocky said was convicted February 2 on a [it might -have on the political fu-jlast night that Russia is- helping New of the biggest cash, dividends in American his- tory will go to General Motors stockholders on December 10. It totals more than With other payments already made this year, it will bring the company's grand total of dividends lor 1949 to more than one-third of a billion i---------------------------------------------- dollars. billion dollars more than the.com- This is an all-time record for parable 1948 figure of slavery charge and is serving of Governor Thomas, E. Dew-1 Czechoslovakia use her three and a half-year term in the! uranium federal prison at Springneld, Mo. I Dewey, titular leader of .O.P., campaigned up and down! n. 'mines "to ensure the peace of all worid." cdebratlon to set the he should receive as well! pointed to the Senate seat last the Soviet bolshevik revolution, ly upon the resignation of New i Zapotocfcy made public officially iiu uiuiicy HC oiiuuiu reueive as weui-f .__. _? Th-> Jas to determine whether it was Robert F' WaSner- been reliably reported for I back wages or punitive damages ori (Continued on Page 15, Column z.jjsome Russians are ex-; plotting the nation's important UT-J VOTING application to develop St. Law- rcnco river power drew puzzled speculation today. Prior to the commission's sur- prise announcement, made overiboth' the weekend, both friends and foes- of development of the St. Law- rence had reason to feel that the state's proposal had been more or less permanently sidetracked. The commission itself had heightened this feeling when, last! March, it said it was postponing j further consideration until Con-! gress took action one way or the other on the proposed St. Lawrence seaway development. However, in its announcement Washington that consideration is being resum- Corporation settled with its striking. Jones and Laughlin the fourth ed. the FPC said "It seems desir-workers today on a compromise wel-bjggest procjucer, came able to dispose of the pending np-'fare plan. nignt on p'recisely plication at this time particularly! The agreement leaves only the as Bethlehem. as suc-h action may be of assist- dustrys giant. U. S. Steel Corpora-! R-niihlir Nn 1 in thP nnce to Congress if it should decide tion strikebound nmore 'he bie fou- RePubllc; 3 m th.f tn lecKlation ronrrrninff' i "monB -ne oig lou. signed up today on much the same to consider legislation Government mediators thn mattpr 11. i took it as the sign of a swelling tide Republic Steel Ends 39-Day-Old Strike Republic Steel came to terms first. in during the same the matter. Legislation to author.ze the sea- ]abor Generally that agreement pro- vides: Pensions Company paid on the Bethlehem General Motors Corporation and financial circles said it probably is an all-time record for the United States. The yearly earnings will amount to a share for common stock, which has a par value of The 000. The net profit for the first nine months of this year was compared to for the same period last year. Thisjby noon: 17 dead, 12 injured. La Crosse, Wis. Mrs. Nola Larson's testimony at the prelimin- ary examination of her husband. Arnold, on a murder charge was labeled "improper" by Circuit Judge Gerald E. Boileau of Wausau today. Larson, who has pleaded innocent to first degree murder in the death of Dr. James McLoone, has peti- tioned Judge Boileau to set aside the divorce he granted Mrs. Larson last June. Arguments on the petition are being heard today. Mrs. Larson, in her testimony .it the preliminary hearing October 31, said her husband had told her that he had killed the physician. But Judge Boileau said the testimony was "improper" under Wisconsin statutes because it related a con- versation between the Larsons before their divorce decree became final. The decree will not become final until June, 1950. Boileau said the statutes are clear on the point. But he added that his ruling "may not be binding on any other court." The point of whether the 35-year- old auto salesman and Mrs. Lar- son legally are divorced has be- ;ome an issue in the state's first degree murder case against Lar- son in the killing of Dr. James McLoone. Defense Attorney Philip Arneson filed papers in circuit court yes- terday maintaining that neither Larson nor Mrs. Larson was a le- gal resident of Wisconsin for two years before the divorce was grant- ed in June. Such residence is a condition for divorce' in this state. Larson moved from La Crosse to Minneapolis shortly after Dr. Mc- Loone was found shot to death No- vember 14, 1947. Mrs. Larson testified at her former husband's preliminary learing October 31 that he had told her he killed the doctor. The de- argued then that her testi- presHential election today. The tolljmony could not be admitted since Bloodshed Marks Election In Philippines By Spencer Davis Manila Violence and bloodshed marked the Philippines year's total dividend will be Of the company's stock closed here of common stock, E. I. Du fore the company De Nemours and Company at a share. The year's div-jholds and will receive idend will be 80 per cent of the pearly a quarter of the dividend, par value and almost 12 per Du Pont board will meet about anium mines. Zapotocky said the mines were being worked "with the help of the Soviet Union and its science." "I think we have nothing to hide and nothing to be ashamed Zapotocky declared. "There are; uranium deposits on our territory. 'We are proud of being able to of yesterday's price. Reaction to the news on the New York stock exchange will be de- layed until tomorrow, since the ex- change Is closed, today for the gen- eral election. The San Francisco exchange still November 15 to decide its own dividend action. Forty towns were clamped under Philippine constabulary control to preserve order. Shootings at scattered points inj the islands marred the balloting of I probably more than Fili- pinos to name, the young Repub- lic's second elected president. was open, however, when word to hold back a high per- announcement hit the tickers, jcentage of profits for new plant The price shot up immediately bigger expenses. a, share of The newj They said they now are dividend will be paid to stockhold-ified to be in a position to make In a joint statement, C. E. Wil-j The bloodiest outbreak was at son, General president, andJNarvacan in Hocos Sur, President in northern Luzon. There, by interior j department confirmation, constab-j years made it necessary for the use them to block the aggression ers of record November 17, and! a dividend payment that is above and bandit greed of the warmong-jwill be a share for common 'the reduced level of dividends in she still was married to Larson. Larson's trial is set for Novem- ber 28. Pontiff's Remarks OnDivorceClarified By Church Group The National Welfare Conference says ulary troopers killed ten civilians j Pope Plus did not intencii jn some women and'remarks he made Sunday, to place wounded eight others. flat ban on the granting of di- Only a few hours after poll Catholic judges i The group pointed out, however, ing, irregularities were reported a promincnt Catholic thco- ers. to help ensure the Deferred stockholders postwar years, thus helping tjn hlch wllj tfiloglan has held that a Catholic nf get regular dividends. correct what has been an inequity o..lrinn hi. "7.1 The huge dividend comes from to the stockholder group." work of all progressive powers, to ensure the peace of all the world." Uranium, principal element in the Senate and House. 'A Senate officials have held sessT Vno? be far' Insurance The present contnb-j The bill, however, is apart from awa-v- utory Plan is continued, but with: the proposal irmde by New York. Tne Republic agreement put new increased benefits, employes contm-j pressure behind mediation efforts in uing to pay three and a half cents' the coal mine stoppage. an hour and the company putting Bethlehem, No. 2 steel producer, in two and a half cents. making atom, bombs, is known tolfor the first nine months this income exist in important deposits in well over years. Jachymov (Joachimstal) region near, the Czech-German border. The two stockholders have lagged behind Quirino and his Liberal party is "bound" to avoid, if po.s- the remain m Power through the next sible, granting a divorce "which sam mefour years_ WJU probably be tlle occasion .or High of 76 Winona Enjoys Late Summer Blue skies, summer sunshine and the warmest. November rending since 1944. Thru was the choice meteorological menu dished up for Winonans Monday. The temperature was a com- fortable TO at noon. At p.m.. the mercury hnd reached 76. highest reading this f.ill since October 19. when it also wns 76 Minimum for the day was 36. What a contrast from 1948 nnd 1947. Last year on the seventh of November, the hicli was 45 and low 34. There were snow first of the year. In 1947. November 7 brought snow nnd tempera- tures which ranged from 32 to 28. Aside from the record 79 on November 1. 1944, the warmest November rending in recent years was the 76 recorded No- vember 1. 1933. At 8 a.m. today, the ther- mometer was 37. and by noon the mercury was close to 55. with sunshine and pleasant Indian summer prevailing. Victor Lawrence, vice-president of the Jones Laughlin Steel Corporation, left, and Philip Murray, CJ.O. Steelworkers president, sign contracts at Pittsburgh ending the 38-day-old steel strike. The contract calls for the same settlement as Bethlhem Steel. (A.P. to The Republican-Herald.) U. 5. to Recognize Red China Soonf Lawmaker Believes By Richard P. Powers AP Special Washington Service Washington Representa- tive Smith (R.-Wis.) predicted to- day that the administration will recognize communist China before January 1. "I make the further Smith said, "that, as result of such recognition. Secretary of State Acheson will eventually be forced to resign as secretary." Smith is a member of the House foreign affairs committee. He is opposed to recognition of the Chi- nese communist regime. He said he still believes aid to Chinese Na- tionalist forces could cut off the communists. "Everything points to American recognition of communist China be- fore the end of the Smith said in an interview. "First, there is the pressure on our government by other govern- Britain's who want recognition so they can do business -with the communists. "Secondly, there is a sufficient following in the State department which claims that the Chinese up- rising is a 'peoples which I do not will bring heavy pressure to bear for zrouns in the last! His opponents are Dr. Jose P.lan invalid remarriage." 6 i Laurel, Nacionalista party candi-j The conference issued a statement date who has made an amazing [yesterday to clarify the Pope's re- political comeback since he was (marks. The statement said: puppet president during the Jap- Pope's Remark anese wartime occupation, andl "Some confusion seems to have jthird party Candidate Jose Aveli-larisen over the recent statement no, former Liberal party chairman of Pope Pius XTI, made to an Ital- iwho split with Quirino this year andean Catholic lawyers congress, that 'became the dark horse in'the race, 'the Catholic judge cannot pro- 1 The nation also is choosing a Bounce, unless for motives of great (vice-president, eight senators and a decision of civ.; divorce 100 representatives to the it does exist, m a mar- house of congress. Block voting jnaSe yahd before God and the prevails and each party pinned itsj hopes on its presidential candi. 'The quote attributed to the holy jfather aoes not represent a lly arrived at position of the Cath- Eeports of violence and death Ojjc church The commotl vtew of came.quickly after the heavily that the act of guarded polls opened in the_outly- U jud jn a dlvorce ing islands -from Hollo on offidal nagan on Mindanao, Tacloban rcgards the ef_ Lejte. jfects of the marriage as no long- A constabulary man was killed jer existing. in centra! Luzon and another was! Circumstances Determine. wounded. I "Since this declaration is in it- i A father and son died in a burst 'self a morally indifferent action, of fire from the gun of a police jit can by permitted, at least in sergeant ii. Paranaque, southern certain circumstances. In develop- ing this point. Father Francis J. Connell, distinguished moral theo- logian in his volume, 'Morals and Politics in published in 1946, makes the following state- ment: 1 "The Catholic judge knows that the marriage itself cannot be; dis- Official observations for the 24'soh'ed D? the state- and in grant- hours ending at 12 m. today: a divorce he has no intention Maximum 76- minimum, 36: noon, of exempting tie parties from any- 54; precipitation, none; sun seises m.or? tha? the jtonight at sun rises at suburb of Manila. Manila itself was quiet. WEATHER LOCAL WEATHER A Portrait Of Josef Stalin adorns the wall of a large reception room of the Soviet embassy in Washington as more than guests gathered yesterday at a party celebrating the 32nd anniversary of the Russian revolution. Soviet Ambassador Alexander Panyushkin, who with Foreign Minister Andrei Vishinsky, acted as host, said the portrait is the work of "a prominent Soviet artist named Nelov." (A-P. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald. more than the of the effects of their mar- riage. Nevertheless, when the TrcntWAr unTfirrAST'S the probability or FEDERAL FORECASTS the certamty of attempted re- Winona and vicinity: Fair to- marriage, his act of granting the di- night. Wednesday increasing cloudi-vorce material co-operation to- ness fpllo-ved by light rain Wednes- >wara5 his sin. Hence, according to day night. No important change in ae principles of co-operation temperatures. Low tonight 36 m there musl be a good reason the city, slightly below freezing in the country; high Wednesday 58. Additional weather on Page 15. performing this reason suf- ficiently weighty to justify the per- mitting of the evil effect.   

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