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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: November 7, 1949 - Page 1

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Publication: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - November 7, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              WARMER TONIGHT, MILD TUESDAY SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY CHEST VOLUME 49, NO. 223 WINONA, MINNESOTA, MONDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 7, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES TODAY- U. S. Must Risk Stand For Allies By Joseph and Stewart Alsop Washington Lest everyone for- gfft the changed world we are living in, it might be wise to begin each day by repeating, "Six and 25 make 31, and 25 makes 56." The incanta- tion will have meaning, for these figures are the best available esti- mates of the annual Soviet produc- tion of atomic weapons. In other words, if the intelligence experts have calculated correctly, the kremlln will possess a stockpile of six atomic bombs by September, 1950; of 31 by September, 1951, and; of 56 by Septomber, 1952. Twenty-1 five atomic bombs per annum is con- sidered the maximum Russian out-i put. Production is therefore expected! to continue at this rate until the; Soviet empire's exploitable stocks ofj fissionable raw stud have finally! been exhausted. I Forecasts like this must of course be taken with a grain of salt, even; when they emanate from authorita-i tive sources. There is no way of tell-1 ing whether the analysts have now over-rated Soviet capabilities, or are still erring on the low side as in the past. All that can be said for! these figures is that they represent! th< best guess available, concerning! the most critical single factor in thej grim timetable oi world events. such, however, these figures must he taken very seriously Indeed, until more dependable data have been secured. THE MEANING OF THE FIG- URES is simple and obvious. Within i two, three, or four years, depending on the caution of their military planners, the masters of the krem- lln will have a sufficient stockpile of atomic weapons to begin bullying the nations of Western Europe. Not long thereafter, if the Soviet war planners can meanwhile solve the problem of an attack at such long range, their stockpile will also be- come a threat to the United States, On the brighter side, the analysts have only one contribution to make. In the late thirties, the Soviet gov- ernment superintended and publish- ed a detailed, highly professtonal geological survey of the U.S.SJR. asj then constituted. By a strange' chance, this official geological sur- vey appears to show that, the vastj Russian land mass suffers from the same lack of satisfactory sources of fissionable raw stuff as the land mass of the United States. At the time when the survey was taken, at any rate, no formations likely I to contain uranium or thorium had yet been located. The evidence of the geological survey is thought to be reinforced by the brutal intensity with which the Soviets are working the Jachy-j mov and Erzgebirge uranium depos- its In Czechoslovakia and the east zone of Germany. For these reasons. the majority of the experts strongly suspect that the Czech and east German mines are the sole Soviet ore sources. If this is so, it is pre- dicted that ore shortages will halt Soviet manufacture of atomic weap- ons at the end of about six years. U. S. Planning War, Russ Say N. Y. Election Tuesday Preview of '50 Senate Race Overshadows Other Contests Dulles, Lehman Make Issue of Truman's Program Board Considers ire-Fighting or County F iUnit f< By The Associated Press In a preview of the 1950 struggle for control of Congress, Troops Parade for Hours in i Moscow Square Big Reception Planned Tonight In Washington By Eddy Gilmore Moscow Soviet sol- diers and mechanized forces and Soviet workers paraded for hours today through Red square in honor of ihe Russian revolution. Soviet leaders hailed the 32nd anniversary of the revolu- tion in speeches accusing the Unit- ,d By Gordon Holtc The board of Winona 'county for their _ i November session here taken under consideration a proposal cd of fomenting a new wor! steps be taken for the organization of a fire-fighting unit, for the balh ,.n.p-Jrural areas of the county. The minister of the armed A Gilmore valley resident, R. M. Davenport, appeared before the Marsnal Alexander M. Va- across the nation today to comment on the recent bluff fire near St. Marys college siievskVi reviewed the march-past. senator, two House members, j which, he contended, "could jtwo governors and many local of-1 been put out in a half hour if Ificials tomorrow. !equipment and personnel had been A special Senate race in early enough." York overshadows all others In in-i Davenport was referring to the: terest. ifire which burned for several days! In that contest and in certain 'last week along the bluffs from Su- if I I I others, labor as well as the major: ear Loaf to St. Mary's college and I flf 'political parties will have grass, brush and trees on JlltjttVj IIIIUUU I thing at stake. [many acres of land. i The A.F.L. and C.I.O. have put! No Lost The fire did Crazed Mother i This Dramatic Picture shows Rex Mays, one of the world's leading automobile drivers, hurtling to his death during the 13th lap of a 100-mile race at Del Mar, Calif., yesterday. His car is whirling through the air, throwing him onto the track where another car struck him. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Republi- can-Herald.) I their chips down together on Dem-1 Tne fire dld not destroy any locratic former Governor Herbert I buildings although a- number of H. Lehman in the New York elec-l structures on the St. Mary's college; tion to round out the farm near the college campus were; ing in January, Senator! threatened for several hcurs. Wagner who resigned I "As soon as that flre Steel Strike Peace Moves Heighten Hopes By Norman Walker Of Four Children Sterling. III. A mother said last i while squadrons of fighters and ;bomb'erx. led by General Vasily [Stalin, son of the prime minister, zoomed over the square. Vasilevsky made the Red square j address. It was similar in tone to 'the speech last night of Dcuply Prime Minister Georgi M. Malcn- [kov. who asserted that a third world war would ;irove "the grave ,'of individual capitalist countries." i Vasilevsky also said that the m.i- terial wealth of the Soviet people  'ears or'more service. The pre- Volved in a policy of weakness.-vlous monthly pension under; automobile race accident in excused on'the ground that ac Plan In effect f years at Mar. Calif. nation in the world is company was 3115.50. The champion loo poor to afford an adequate na-1 Social Insurance club is made up solely of men who tional defence i Terms also were agreed upon have finished the 500-mile Memor-: m for a new social insurance plan ial day race at the Indianapolis mo-j under which the company pays.tor speedway with an average' about three and three-fourths cents speed of 100 miles an hour or fast- material but close j and pretty soon he was able to id he was 3u. He his feet out." 1931 j After a few minutes, the other ..as married and the gave up their frantic clawing of two children. His home the dirt covering David They 'called firemen. But David was dead, firemen found when they un- covered his body with mattocks. Dr. Joseph A. Geer, coroner, said David's parents, Mr. and toy Spung, were in Harmony, Spung is a traveling black- Dr. Geer said. He said thej _ after Rex Mays died in S0n, Roy, Jr., a high school WEATHER d was in ch f the {am. of seven children. lowan injured FEDERAL FORECASTS per man hour with the employes er. Mays was former president of I 11' Granger, sell Hancock, 28, Granger, was in-: jured near here Sajjirday about p. m. when his went out of! control off the roatf-'and rammed aj New Delhi home min- stump. He was take hospital with 'paying about two and one-fourth the club and the 14th member to, Winona and vicinity: Pair and cents per man hour. die. little warmer tonight: low 42 in Over the weekend a new steel The city. 36 in the country. Gen- strike broke out as 10.000 of Mur- erally fair and continued mild ray's union members left their S Tuesday high 70. at five plants of the Timken Roll- _ LOCAL WEATHER er Bearing Company, over the pen- UGH 160 Official observations for the 24 sion-insurance demand. hours ending at 12 m. Sunday: The government, apparently ex- Maximum 56- minimum, 27; noon.'pecting the steel strike to said today that N.v. B6 wSktion nor-e, !soon. has turned its mediation and N. B. Apte had been broken nose. Considerable glass bffkTal observations for the 24 forts on the coal stalemate. [denied clemency and will be hang-jwas removed from his body, par- onrtintt at r m todav: Cvrus S. Ching, Mediation Serv-ied as scheduled November 15 forjticularly from his face j MMtaunTv "minimum, 35: noon.'vice director, called in assassination of Mahatma; The accident occurred about Maximum, iv, .._.., ________.r-- miles west of here on a county road j the Harmony ny cuts and a orec'Ditation none: sun sets to- coal operators for talks this nieht at 4 50 sun rises Ching expects to meet with; The -official said they would be after a tire had blown out. Wiley inorthem and western Ambala, jail, wHere theyjThatcher called a Harmony phy- Weather on Page 13.) later in the week. J I are now imprisoned. isician. Wnen Mr. And BIrs. Fred SchoviUe of Soldiers Grove, Wis., had an addition to their family they were just about out of names. They already had 19 children. The Schovilles decided to call the new arrival Charles. Fred, 42, and his wife. 39, admire Charles, who was a husky ten pounds at birth. The Scho- villes' oldest a daughter, is 23. All the births were single. Schoville is an oil salesman. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) premier, Traicho Kostov, for al- leged plotting with agents of Yugo- slavia's Marshal Tito, the United States and Great Britain. Bulgaria's government, said Pop- tomov, is "unraveling proofs that Traicho Kostovists and the company around them have boon j the main agents of Tito's clique land Anglo-American intelligence in jour country." I Hints Trial Near I Tbe alleged conspiracy, he dc- Iclared, was "aimed at tearing laway our country from the Soviet i Union and handing her over to Ti- to's band, thus turning her into a colony of the Anglo American imperialists. "Soon our society will have the possibility to learn the specific facts on this disgusting Poptomov said. But Marshal Tito's Yugoslav government, though the target for some of Russia's severest recent I criticism, sent birthday greetings to Moscow along with the satellites still high in kremlin favor. A Tanjug dispatch broadcast Belgrade said the president the Yugoslav national assembly I executive committee wired "sir.- greetings and best wishes for :the well being of the people of the Union." Argentina contributed a jarring ;note to the anniversary weekend, j Federal police in Buenos Aires ar- j rested 705 persons at a Communist party celebration. They were ac- cused of disorderly conduct for re- fusing to disband their meeting. The police said municipal au- thorities first authorized the gath- ering, then decided the audience would be unsafe. Jerusalem liad a minor diploroa- (Contintied on Page 7, Column 2.) U. S.   

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