Winona Republican Herald, November 1, 1949

Winona Republican Herald

November 01, 1949

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Issue date: Tuesday, November 1, 1949

Pages available: 16

Previous edition: Monday, October 31, 1949

Next edition: Wednesday, November 2, 1949

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Publication name: Winona Republican Herald

Location: Winona, Minnesota

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Years available: 1947 - 1954

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Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - November 1, 1949, Winona, Minnesota COLDER TONIGHT, WEDNESDAY VOLUME 49, NO. 218 WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 1, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY CHEST SIXTEEN PAGES TODAY- Europe Asks Trade Unity To Recover By James Marlow Washington Europe must "unify its economy." That is what! Hoffman, head of the Mar- shall plan, has just told Europe. This is a rough explanation of his meaning. The problem is not sim- ple. The Marshall plan, due to! end in has helped Europe; recover. What may hap- pen after the plan's help ends? Will Europe stumble, stagger and collapse? Unless it's con- vinced Europe is making a strong effort to help it- self after 1952. Cor.g.ress may start cutting down the plan be- fore :hem. So Hoffman tells Europe to ify its economy." To understand' what he has in mind, first look atj the United States of America. The 48 states all use the same money. .None limits what another can send into it. Trade moves across state lines as if they didn't exist. Since the 48 states have about 150.000.000 people, that's a terrific market for sales in any line. Competition Grows To win thai, market, the various manufacturers have to compete against one another by selling as cheaply as they can. That means learning how to make their products as cheaply possible. The efficient ones pros- per, the inefficient go out of busi- ness. The thinking behind the Aroeri-j can system is this; by selling atj the lowest possible price, throughj efficient production, you sell toj more people. The more you can sell, the more you want to turn oui since it means more profit for you. But the more you can turn out, the greater the need for workers to turn it out. That increases employment whlch means more people with money to spend and, in turn, ision Q State Executive Council Clears rostero Marlow un- Dollar Bail Planned en Convicted Reds New govern- ment asked bail for the 11 convicted communist leaders today in the event they nre let out of jail while their appeals are being heard. Irving S. Shapiro, special as- sistant to the U. S. attorney, told the U. S. circuit court of appeals that this was tho view of Attorney General J, Howard McGrath. Shapiro said the government would want bail each for seven of the convicted men and for each of the four others. All 11 have been in jail since their conviction last month on charges of conspiring to advo- cate overthrow of the U. S. government by force. Federal Judge Harold K. Me- dina refused to free them on bail pending their appeals. Lawyers for the 11 asked the appeals court today to overrule Medina. The court reserved decision. Fire, Blast Rip Big Washington Postoffice Washington Fire, JUVllCjr SPCIJU ranto tte Firemen were unable to bank. I saw them bring a either elevator, but concentrated ef- out Oj tne wreckage and forts on saving large gasoline tanks, severa] men. They were terribly bat- i about a block away. It was not immediately determined jmore." j couid not stand to look any She said Dr. McLoone asked her he killed Dr. James McLoone. Mrs. Noia Larson added that Destroy the letter and she did. former husband, Arnold Larson, 35, (f I ,.ii-, Another letter purportedly writ-( ten to the hospital by Larson was! presented, but its contents were not read in court. promised he would kill her t-jo if I Austin, Minn. A friendly ever reveaied his story. chat between a world-famous doc-j she testified at Larson's pr-ilim tor and a Minnesota meat packer I inary hearing on a charge of first At this point Holm jumped to nas his feet. "I wish to state I j nothing to do with actions of the investment board and therefore I of arthritis sufferers. Police Chief Herman Rick tes- that Larson appeared volun- _____________ questioning during the in- "county without bail. I vestigation of the doctor's death. hrnnirht an incrpasp' in Dro-ldegree murder. At the end o." the Police brought an increase m pro Larson was bound that ion of the drug used for relief circult court for trjal and Temand-i tarily for how much grain was in the two capacity elevators. Loss lii Mill Fire At Minneapolis The drug is known as compound; Mrs Larson.s {estimony in the don't think you should refer to the E. It is made from desoxycholic j two.year-old slaying of the prom- four members." he said. acid. The acid is made from the; four he said. The governor replied: "Aren't you a party to the "Yes, I'm a party to the find- bile of sheep and beef cattle. Where test tubes and beakers been used at one time to make! Three firemen were taken to ernor interrupted. iings, Holm began. The gov-jthe acid, production already has emergency hospital. They were! overcome" by smoke while fighting the blaze. The building houses several Post- Meeting Adjourns "I think that's meeting been stepped up enough so now 50-gallon vats are: needed. j Dr. Charles Mayo of the Mayoj Clinic at Rochester, Minn., and Firemen said the blaze apparently ;gan in an electrical transformer room. The first sign of difficulty iff, it pretty tough for New a flickcring of jignts Jersey hatmakcrs to sell in New iBarkley Searching For Wedding Ring Corey, president of the George! don't think j A Horrnei Company, at that's all. As long as >cu old friends. frequently! to the correctness and findings oni t visits. the record, it might be advisable! It was on a recent visit that1 for you to say wherein these conversation turned to re-! incs nre not correct." Calmly, the governor responded: York. So, with all these obstacles to in- terstate trade the manufacturers in each state turn out their poods mainly for the people of their own state. That limits the market and the incentive to produce. Big Markets If New York, say, has st Vice-President people while fil! 48 have 150.000.000, Barklcy still hasn't found the the New York hat.mnker is miss- of wccjaing ring wants for his to the new compound! E and its relief of arthritis suf- determine that question my-jjerers i self. The meeting is adjourned." But' [he doctor explained there! Holm wanted to know if an ad-jwas a portage of desoxycholic! journment motion was necessary, j acid gmce it is nlade from thel JThe governor asked Burnquist of cattle and sheep Corey sajd] wished to make the motion Hormei piant could indjourn. He did. Schmahl second-' lant had about 400 pounds of bile led the motion and the brief ses-iavaiiable daily. ision ended. That's when the research forces' Foster, who the cjinic laboratories andj p t.he Hornlel plant joined forces i and retired to his private office. U0 elimulate the bottleneck in pro- Secretary Holm is not a of desoxycholic acid. :r of the state investment board I Now the doctor and the packer! authorized purchase of injr H potential market of 000, Since his market is rompara- Barkley and Mrs. Carleton S.I lively small and competition frorniHadley, 38, who announced their! nt vi outside manufacturers is cut dnte Sunday, shopped 3uthorlzed Purcnase 01 si, research aides are seek- New York manufacturer a ring'yesterday. But they on Page 13, Column 3.) jing new methods to boost produc-jln.e' for Nov. 14 La Crosse, Judge Robert S. Cowie today disqualified himself to preside at the first dcjirrce murder trial of Arnold Larson, 35, accused slayer of Dr. James McLoone. Judge Cowie made the an- nouncement as Larson was ar- raigned and entered a plea of innocent through his attorney, Philip Arneson of La Crosse. The veteran jurist, a long- time acquaintance of the slain physician, said Circuit Judge Koland J. Stsinle of Milwaukee would preside. He set the trial for 10 a. m. November 14, two years to the day from the time Dr. McLoone's bullet-riddled body was found beside a. high- way. Larson was returned to a La Crosse county jail cell. Wiscon- sin law prohibits bond in a first degree murder charge. Larson as saying would Minneapolis set Loss today i The under belly of the airplane I was ripped open. Volunteers working with polico land firemen had the first bodies i removed from the plane before the iconfusion subsided at the scene. Hundreds of automobiles were back- ed up on the highway which was blocked by police for the ambu- lances. Boatmen were going back and fourth over the river looking for bodies. The Civil Aeronautics adminis- tration identified the pilot of the military plane as Rios Bridoux, di- rector of civil aviation in Bolivia. The CAA gave this account of le actual crash: was on a test flight Larson, a La Crosse auto sales- man at the time of the slaying, later moved to Minneapolis and aMy be-: fore flames swept through the foot tail Tonka mill following took up similar work. He was explosion and fire. rested at Minneapolis several A. D. McGuire, a Tonka official, weeks ago and finally waived ex- said the S100.000 loss to the build- tradition. mg- and equipment would be in-; The story told by Mrs. Larson creased by damage to grain and; was one which she said Larson feed. The elevator had capacity of! had told to her as they rode in an bushels and was two-thirds automobile on a highway near he reported. instructions and was ad- the tower that he was ______ .0 come down, behind the IE.A.L. night. Call Not Acknowledged The tower ordered Bridoux to the doesn't produce on a mass to find just what they want-! So his production costs are higher. cd He'd have to be more efficient, producing more cheaply, if he were competing against hntmakers in all 43 states. But doesn't he have to compete against other New- York Imtrrmkcrs to capture the New York trade? Not if the New York hatmakers make deals, dividing up the New- York market nmoncr themselves so all of them can stay in business, his prices stay up. This picture of the 48 states, is crudely, the picture of modern Eu- rope. So when Hoffman tells Europe to "unify its economy." he's urging a European economic setup lik" that of the United States: Elimi- nation of trade barriers, competi- tive production for 270.000.000 Eu- ropeans instead of the people of just one nation and the jobs and' efficiency he thinks that would; mean, plus a straightening out of: the tangled European money sys-l tern. Hoffman is talking of an eco- nomic Europe something like the! United States. He's not suggesting i oil fnrm FOSTER tion further so more arthritis vic- tims may be aided. Crosse last August This was about six weeks after (Continued on Page 11, Column 4.) McLOONE Charles Johnson, a deputy fire chief, said he believed the started from a dust explosion. the commercial ship. He did not acknowledge the call, which the control tower repeated several times. lire they all form one That might come later or have to follow. Charles Foster poses with the state executive council, which refused to oust him as secretary of the state investment board at St. Paul this morning. Left to right above are Foster, State Auditor Stafford King. Attorney General J. A. A. Burnquist, Treasurer Julius Schmahl and Secretary of State Mike Holm. (AP. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) La Crosse physician came after a 45-minute legal battle. The defense argued that her di- vorce papers had not been legally served and, therefore, that the di- vorce was not vs.lid and she could not testify against her husband. But County Judge Boy V. Ahl- strom overruled this argument and permitted her to take the stand, j I He warned her, however, that she i could not testify as to any conver- jsations with her husband at the jtime they were man and wife. Mrs. Larson said her former hus- iband told her about the shooting at a meeting in Waterloo park last 6. Their divorce had be- Icome final in June. i She testified that lie gave her ;this acc-ount of the shooting: Larson had followed Dr. Mc- !Loona for about a week. On the night of November 14, 1947, he hid 'in the physician's car. After driv- ing some distance. Dr. McLoone to catch and tried 'to jump out. Larson fired three shots and the doctor fell. Then he fired three 'more shots at the physician's pro- strate body. He thought of rolling the body down an embankment, but decided not to for fear of leav- ing clues. Sister Mary Clorella. testified that Spectators In Adjoining rail yards are showered with sparks as flames roar through the 80-foot tall elevator of the Tonka Mills Company at Minneapolis last night with loss set at more than (AP. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) I Tower observers saw him coming straight in and called to him to pull up. There was no indication that he heard or understood the order. Bolivian, embassy officials said he as their country's best pilot who 1 ad been trained in various U. S. schools and at Randolph Field. CAA officials said the smaller plane was a P-38 of the Bolivian airforce. Government officials said r-e Bolivian government bought two -33 planes from the U. S. One was sent to Bolivia. The other had been kept here pending routine clearance. Officials said Bridoux had ori- ginally planned to leave with the plane two or three days ago, but had delayed his departure in order to make further tests of the craft. Minnesotans Idle in Steel Strike St. Paul thou- and ninety-two persons were idle in Minnesota on October 29 be- cause of the steel strike, a labor market survey showed today. This is an increase of in the last seven days. All the in- crease involved workers outside the iron range, WEATHER LOCAL WEATHEB Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 58: minimum, 27; noon, 58; precipitation, none; sun sets tonight at sun rises to- morrow at FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity: Cloudy, turning colder late tonight; low 35. Clearing and colder Wednesday; high 42. (Additional Weather on Pace 13.) ;

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