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Winona Republican Herald: Tuesday, October 25, 1949 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - October 25, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              COLDER TONIGHT, WEDNESDAY VOLUME 49, NO. 212 SUPPORT YOUR COMMUNITY CHEST WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 25, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY SIXTEEN PAGES TODAY- ECA Urges U.S. Increase Imports By James Marlow Washington Officials of the Marshall Economic Co- operation administration have Just said a few things about Europe and made some sugges- tions. Over the weekend ECA issued a 227 page report, the results of studies here and abroad by spe- cialists of ECA and the Depart- ment of Com- merce. The studies began months ago. This country has been pouring billions of dollars into Europe to help it get healthy. This can't continue in- definitely. The government help all means money out of your pock- et in the taxes you pay. What then can be done so that Europe does get healthy? About the main thing the report said was this: The U. S. should increase the amount of things it imports. It said: "World trade is fundamentally out of balance. .other countries! simply are not earning enough dol-! lars to pay for what they import' from us. They have a dollar short- age." In other words: If Europe could sell us more of its own since we'd pay them with dollars for what we have more dollars to buy from us. From July 1914 through 1948, the report said, the U, S. exported goods and services to a value of 270 billion dollars and Imported goods and services valued at about 169 billion dollars. Exports Predominate So we exported 101 billion dol- lars more than we Imported in that 34-year period. How was the1 difference paid for? Some of it was in donations by private individuals or organiza- tions, some in capital loans by pri- vate groups. billion dollars U.S. Atomic Security Flayed Marlow The Waterford Hotel Bar where crazed Farmer Joe Runyon fired shotgun blasts through a window last night at Waterford, Mich., looked like this after the shooting. A policeman points his flashlight in the general direction of blasts which hit four patrons seated on the bar stools. Six other persons were wounded in a tavern across the street by another series of blasts. (AP. Wirephoto to The Republican- Herald.) Jet Airliner Cruises Along At440M.P.H. Crazed Michigan Farmer Wounds Ten, Kills Self Waterford, crazed, middle-aged farmer shot up two taverns last night, then killed himself after wounding ten persons. On a mad spree with a shotgun Joe Runyon, 57, terrorized this sleepy little resort village in a begrudging farewell to the world. Two of his victims, both women, were critically wounded. Defense Chiefs Meet, First Time Since Navy Row Bradley Urged To Withdraw 'Fancy Dans' Remark By Jerry Korn Washington The nation's military leaders meet today for the first regular session of the joint chiefs of staff since their bitter uni- fication row flared out on Capitol Hill. Most of the principals in the dra- matic House investigation into de- fense policy were scheduled to be on hand for the secret meeting: General Omar Bradley, chairman of the joint chiefs; General J, Law- ton Collins, Army chief of staff; General Hoyt Vandenberg, Air Force jchief of staff, and Admiral Louis E. chief of naval operations. Denf eld was one of a parade of j admirals who told the House armed! jservices committee that sea power I is being weakened in the pentagon, !to the detriment of national de- fense. That charge was denied by an G.O.P. Calls For Effective Progress Plan Minority Report Cites Incompetent, Wasteful Action By Oliver W. De Wolf Washington Republicans posted a declaration today to the Atomic Energy commission that "leisurely, wasteful or incompe- tent" administration of the na- tion's atomic program .cannot be tolerated. The stand was expressed In a statement signed by six minority members of the joint congressional atomic energy committee. The six demanded "bolder, speedier, and more effective development of the program to maintain the "pre- eminence" of the United States in atomic weapons. The statement was Issued late yesterday in answer to a majority report of the committee. Both.re- ports were follow-ups to an in- vestigation of charges of "incredi- ble mismanagement" directed against the AEC by Senator Hick- enlooper The majority report, signed by the ten Democratic members ol the joint Senate-House committee, impressive list of Army andj cleared the AEC and its chair- lAir Force Brad-! New Dwight D. Eisenhower, in a keynote David E. Lilienthal, who was I ley, Collins and well! last night at the opening of the 18th annual New York Herald Tribune j Hickenlooper's principal target, 'as by Secretary of Defense -warned against encroachments on the traditional freedom of tile j Three Criticisms individual. i He proposed that leaders in various fields meet with faculties of The minority report attacked the great universities to draw a dividing line between the government's, commission on three An Indignant Blue Goose takes a peck at Don Hovey, left, Of Des Moines, Iowa, after Hovey and his companion, Leonard Wagner, right, caught the goose on a plug while Sshing on Clear lake, Clear Lake, Iowa. The four and one-half-pound bird intercepted a cast Hovey made when his boat drifted near a flock of geesa, catching the goose in the wing, (A.P. Wirephoto.) Eisenhower Fears Threats to Freedom London The world's first) Tramping back and forth across a street, Runyon fired seven or eight son- Bradley Criticized h ff d rgument ior the Ajr wfls tal.en to his jemarks yesterday by came from the U. S. government. jet airliner, the British-built De-j charges from a 12-gauge shotgun Democratic Leader McCor- and privileges and those of ithe individual. General Eisenhower, president of Columbia university, said: Of that amount, 49 billion dollars was in grants, almost all made since 1941, and 19 billion dollars in loans. Said the report: "The American taxpayer there- fore has a direct interest in clos- ing the dollar gap as soon as possi- ble." Then the report reasons this way: One method cf making a bal- ance in the future would be to cut down on such government help. But, without such help unless some other method was found, Europe couldn't buy from us. Then New York ln 1952 or 1953 we couldn't sell to her. That would! Captain John Cunningham, De- havilland Comet, made its windows of the two tav- overseas flight from London witnesses said. Tripoli. North Africa, today at aj At the end of a violent ten or speed of about 440 miles an hour.lja minutes, he walked a short dls- Dehavilland company officials j tance up the street and fired a' said the plane left London-at charge throug his own chest.; GMT a.m. EST) and arrived] This was the last in a series: at Castel Benito, Tripoli, at rapid reloadlngs. Runyon's gun. GMT a.m. taking three j was a single-shot weapon. 23 minutes for the Reported in critical condition to-; day at Pontiac general hospital The 36 passenger Comet is In- tended for transatlantic service to to havilland's chief test pilot, flew the plane loaded with testing equip- ment. It carried a crew of three. bring trade in both directions a low level. Four Choices And the ECA experts, like many! Before leaving England, Cunning- others, consider that bad. So itjham said the flight was intended lists four things that could be to provide range and fuel consump done: 1. We could continue to shovel were Mrs. Irene Zurawski, 37, and her mother in law, Mrs. Helen Psciuk, 50. It was at the Zurawski family's small bar where Runyon made one attack. Second Infantry Ready for War Games in Hawaii mack of Massachusetts, The result might not satisfy the i imind and conscience of each of us, Referring to the admirals, Brad-jyet the question would be rescued ley had declared: "This is no time i from domam of for 'Fancy Dans' who won't hit partisan politics and self-! line with all they have on every play ish interest and be subjected to! unless they can call the signals. I i logical analysis McCormacfc issued a statement In judgment." Boston which said: and Region Naval Air Training Plan Revamped gress, security and management. It was signed by Hickenlooper, for- mer joint committee chairman and now ranking G.OP. member; Sena- tors Millikin (R.-Colo.) and Know- land and Representa- tives Cole Elston (R.- Ohio) and Van Zandt Senator Vandenberg now recuperating at his home in Michigan, did not participate in" either report. Representative Hin- shaw (R.-Calif.) reportedly is pre- paring a summary of his own views. The minority report shied away General Eisenhower pointed to I "During the last war the Navy i the coal and steel strikes and oth- !helped make history. They did theirjer industrial deadlocks threatening, !job courageously and effectively. If [to throw more thousands out ofj Minneapolis naval air any admiral cast aspersion on He said the situation arose! station here has nearly completed jgenerals of the Army or Air Force I[ "because a few men cannot _ ft !WTdSe6 thf in his original blast last Aboard USS Eldorado on the admirals which is also bility." __ tho members did Ey Leif Erickson "streamlininj" move, part of a'and "equivocation" used by Hick- teen thousand men of the Second ]an attack on the Navy itself." infantry division stood by for or-1 McCormack made clear he was more efficient operation. (May 22. He added: The types of planes used for] But tne "If undoubted loyalty training are being reduced, but AO.IUI.I .jkuuu uj i jYiu w uiiniujn. iniAUtr w a-o v _ __, H.I1Q 3, IClSurGlV 1H- frnlr6 JTp bar6oilers today to land on Oahu of Bradley's "Fancy dare calamity of aircraft will not be approach to major pro- E? thl liberate it from a mythical which he called number effects. __ __ [unfortunate and disrespectful." He tion information. The pilot said he expected to cruise at 450 miles street before Runyon shambled) The invasion will top off the big- d Brad] to un- QTTTQT7 Tn till nlYYICfMf _______ _ away to kill himself. !gest amphibious games since the Church Yields In Dispute With Czech Commies (along on a farm he was said to have bought a year ago. Little was known of him, but evidently things had gone wrong out American taxpayers' hour. At feet so Europeans', with our money, ithe jet airliner has a top speed j could buy from us. This "is noi0f about 600 miles per hour. worser solution of the basic said the report. 2. We could cut down on our ex- ports but that would damage our various export businesses and! "would cause world trade to stag-i nate again as in the 1930's." 3. Americans could invest capi- tal in Europe and "this is highly desirable" but "the gap is much too large to be closed by this meth od alone." 4. We could increase our pur- chase of imports, thus putting money into the hands of Euro- peans to buy our exports to them. I By Nate Polowetzky The report likes No. 3 and No. 4. Putting No. 4 across, the re- Runyon, a stocky man Little Known of Farmer rjnlike wartime, it's no secret Runyon, a former auto factory [the Second division is supposed to in nearby Pontiac, lived] hit the beaches along Pokai bay. The island is held by "en- emy" troops who theoretically cap- tured Hawaii four months ago. Daylong attacks by carrier planes softened up the invasion tar- get yesterday. Umpires ruled they had left Hickam Field inoperable air fortunate remark." Bradley had no comment. Naval Captain Blamed Captain John G. Crommelin, who touched off the House investigation, was formally notified by Denfeld yesterday that in releasing confiden- tial documents to the press he had broken "military law." Dcnfeld asked Crommelin whether he had any statement to I recently and he had become des pondent. At his tidy farm house was found a note saying: Hawaii I offer a request which pentagon "Take over, Joe. Dads Nationai Guard. !sources said might give the out- work." Grumman Bearcat fighter bomb-jspdken Navy captain a chance to There was also a detailed list of jers and Douglas Skyraider bomb-j talk his way out of a court-martiai. iRunyon's possessions. !ers flew four bombing missions j Crommelin newsmen he would I Assistant Oakland County Prose-j from the operation Miki task a statement, but "I have not the plain citizen determine the reserve men fromj Minnesota, the Dakotas, Iowa Scientist Disagrees viding line between his own and the government's The theme of the forum this year is "What kind of government ahead? The responsibility of ev- ery citizen." It will continue through tomorrow night. to say Use of Parking Meter Funds at New Ulm Argued Wisconsin will remain the Urey> one of tne nation's fore- but other personnel will be trim- med by about 25 or 30. Captain E. E. Pickling, com- manding officer of the station here, said the changeover must be made ing our atomic energy deve'lop- by January 1, but that it prob- ably would be completed a month earlier. Previous to the revamping Czechoslovakia's Catholic bishops backed port points, would require things in ffie bmej. Icutor George Taylor said the note'They made simulated attacks with !apparently was "meant for pound rockets. The Navy planes hit Hickam and decided what I want to say." iders, two "carrier-based" groups of four squadrons each were set up at the station. Under the new I plan, the groups will be disband- New TJlm, Minn. and replaced by ten al to use money derived from! all administered by a single "wing most atomic scientists. "I take the most violent excep- tion to this security he told a reporter in Rochester, N. Y. "This secrecy business is hamper- ment." TJrey called the present emphas- is on secrecy "a lot of damned and said that if he had his way he would "fire all the security guards employed by the AEC except those at the Los Alamos laboratory" in New Mex- like these: vbf's son" Joe Jr a Pontiac resi-i The Navy planes hit Hickam and since October 6, when he identified dent !Barbers point, Navy air base; [himself as the source that had re- backedi _' ___ f riijKaneohe naval air station and Bel-jleased confidential naval corre- Ui JllCUi i_____ _1 J innnnrJ, Crommelin has been suspended parking meters has been turned [staff." "ght today and told their height was Lnowr as to P-on. He had his daily high' government to stay out of T.T'A llcf c tVlo wi of the ECA specialists, on the jail. goods we could use. (The report j The Catnolic hierarchy told the turns thumbs down on just buying tt accept their sala- any kind of European imports from m stat j emphasizes we should buy onlyialt to the governmenWa move had fought so bitterly in re- cent weeks that some 300 priests could use plenty.) cen wees a s 0 The report goes into some been rep0rted arrested. in new stand decl that they still "regretted" the enactment of the church law. was expressed in towr; andD "ddled his dumps, and Sands airfield town and pedaled ms larm crops. onri T.V- here. He began his rampage shortly before p.m. Accounts of wit- nesses varied, but it was estab- lished that he walked from one bar to the other, standing at the windows to fire blasts inside. As alarm swept the town, am- [lows Field on northern Oahu; Scho-jspondence blasting the present arm- barracks, ammunition and. ed forces setup. It was publication of those docu- letter to Secretary of the Navy Matthews from Vice-Admiral Gerald F. Bogan, along with en- dorsements by Admiral Arthur W. Radford and Denfeld which led Ly- bulances sped the ten miles to Pon- tiac with the injured. to Dispute Legality of District Revision on what the European nations turn should do to step uj to us. including reducing auu "i'-irecent proving their controls on stuff ;contro they'd import from us I statement to the nation's M All this is just an ECA report icatholic priests and made Zurawski, 29 son of Mrs but it shows what ECA s special- to Western new amen Psciuk. He was shot in the leat ists think after looking over theiTJle bishops said they were allowjarin. field at home and abroad. Whatling priests to comply with the law! Plenty of Trouble this government. Congress and they be open tn t M h nad ]enty of European governments do is some-ircst and prosecution if they Zurawski said. "He al- thing else. _ not. iso mg ,jf man feels uke Communist Minister of going to die in his old age, Alexei Cepicka has declared that i he might just as well take a few (anyone who opposed the new law [people along with him.' i would be "broken as an enemy of ithe state." The new law, which Minneapolis Constitution-1 gives the government control of ality of the state school district finances and admin- organization act has been challeng-jistratipn of all churches, was pass- ed in a suit filed in Hennepin coun-led by parliament October 14 and ty district court. becomes effective November 1. The action was filed by George; A. Charter, a Hopkins taxpayer.; He seeks to block a special election; I OHI Company raCGS in the Hopkins area to decide1- whether several districts should TOT consolidated. Hearing has been setj for November 22. St. Paul (ff) Toni Corn- In his suit. Charter charges thatlpany, makers of home permanent the law improperly delegates leg-'waves, today faced an islative duties and powers. The federal court patent infringement law delegates to county superin- suit. tendents of schools and survey com- Arnold F. Wilat, San Rafael, mittees the right to call special j Calif., filed the action_ yesterday elections. Sponsors of the act, when it was passed in 1947 and amended in 1949, said its purpose was to make through his attorneys. He is iden- tified as the head of a firm selling beauty shop permanent equipment. on Kauai man Field on Hawaii. They actually substituted Dil- lingham and Wheeler Fields on northern Oahu for Hickam and Barbers point. The latter are used by commercial airlines. down by the New Ulm city coun- Directors of the Civic and Com- merce association at a meeting been flying AEC Pike said the commission might gmed Hellcats a lar aircraft) and T.RM.'s was secur- last night urged that the parking pedo Under the new meter money be used to purchase municipal parking lots. But city council members re up, one type of Corsair and the; Hellcats will be eliminated. The ten new squadrons, each plied that the money could not be made up of 24 pilots, will use a diverted for several years because! total of 80 Corsairs and _____j._-_ IITtl the money is needed 'for operation the lawmakers to call for a public j of the police department and to probe of armed forces differences. Ipay for the meters. Ficher, 60, gray-hair- ed day bartender at the hotel, said that shortly before the shootings Runyon had complained that; "Three of my horses died and I lost The hotel night bartender, Ken- neth Frlesner, 39, was woundefi in the face and neck. He knew Runyon and regarded the farmer j as "a nice fellow." Also wounded at the Zurawski bar were Howard Stites, 26, Or- tonvillp. shot in the face and neck, Dale Palm, 28, Perndale, shot in the face and eyes, and Harold Mes- ton, 28, wounded in right arm and chest. State police said Palm might lose his vision from his wounds. it possible to combine districts to! Wilat asked ten cents royalty on improve efficiency and equalize j each of home permanent educational opportunities. he estimates the firm has sold. At the hotel bar Ben Punty, 49, wave [a hotel employe, was shot in the neck, and James Grant, 60, of Waterford, in the arm and chest. Thomas Hudson of Dearborn was slightly wounded. 12 T.B.M.'s. 300 Million Dollars Expansion Planned Oak Ridge, Tenn. The Atomic Energy commission con- firmed today it is planning a expansion of its atom bomb making facilities. Of this amount, the commission said, would be used for the atomic program and for the Tennessee Valley authority to supply power to meet future requirements at atomic plants here. The commission's statement, which it said was in response to inquiries, confirmed earlier reports from Washington of the proposed expansion. The announcement said Presi- dent Truman has authorized the commission to use of its presently appropriated funds to In Ramsey county district court! start expanding production capaci- today, Judge Carlton F. at Oak Ridge and Hanford, certified to the high court as portant and doubtful" the question! oak Ridge is the center of the whether two -business men fromjAEC's uranium-producing plants. St. Paul can be brought to trial Hanford is the hub of plu'onium for refusing to co-operate with the operations. Both are key materials State High Court To Rule on Coiling Probe Powers St. Paul The Minnesota I Supreme court will be asked to rule on the Investigational powers of Richard A. Golling, state public examiner. A Group Of Prospectors, theu: equipment and plane, arrive on Discovery Island from nearby Fair- banks, Alaska, to join search for gold at an island fishwheel reported Friday. They are, left to right, Charles Biderman, Earl Hirst, Jim Magoffin, pilot, and Sam Gambling. (A.P. Wirephoto to The Re- publican-Herald.) examiner in an investigation. The two are Harvey J. Nolan and Sherburne B. Flowers, officers of the Minnesota Four Wheel Drive Company. They were alleged to) have paid to Former Mayor A. K. Evans of Ortonvllle as a "stipend" in connection with pur- f0r making atomic bombs. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS _ _ _ Winona and vicinity: Mostly a oflcloudy and colder tonight; loweii Ortonville. jfreezing in the city; 26 to 28 in the Golling has demanded prosecu- tion of the two men under provi- sions of an old statute making It unlawful to refuse assistance in in- vestigations. Judge McNally today over-ruled j country. Wednesday partly cloudy and continued cold; highest 44. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 48; minimum, 32; demurrers to the charge filed 48; precipitation, none; sun counsel for the two men, but held sets tonight at sun rises to- that there should be a review of the case by the high tribunal. morrow at Additional weather on Page 13.   

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