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Winona Republican Herald: Tuesday, September 20, 1949 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - September 20, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              FAIR TONIGHT, WEDNESDAY VOLUME 49, NO. 182 WINONA, MINNESOTA, TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 20, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY VELVET VOICE OF RADIO EIGHTEEN PAGES Park, Recreation Boards Merge Canadian Dollar Cut Dutch, French Also Devalue Currencies Repercussions On Money Slash Abroad Awaited Inquest to Be Held In Crossing Deaths Alma Center, inquest will be held shortly in the railroad crossing accident which claimed the lives of two area men here Monday morning, it was announced today by Sidney Jensen, Jackson county coroner. Hundreds of area residents were viewing the twisted wreckage of the 1935 model car in which Jake A. Breitenbach, 63, retired black- and Ralph O. Randals, 33, the driver, were killed. Funeral services for the victims] were completed this morning. Rites for Mr. Breitenbach will be held! at 10 a.m. Thursday at the Imma Canadian Oil Pipeline Gets Trade Licenses By The Associated Press Canada, France and the Nether-! lands are the latest to join in thej world-wide scramble to devalue! their money. They brought the to- tal today to 20 nations that have Juggled their currency to woo American buyers since Britain took the plunge Sunday night. In occupied Japan, General Mac- Arthur authorized the Japanese to buy cheaper .British pounds buti Ottawa The trade turned down growing Nipponese ment has licensed the Interprovin-, clamor for devaluation of the yen. Coal Miners Quit Pits in U. 5. Stoppage Throws More Railroad Men Out of Jobs culate Conception Catholic church wm be Pittsburgh Developments! in the nation-wide United Mine Sisters Survive jlightning today-and unemploy-j Mr. Breitenbach, who would from the stoppage passed the; observed his 64th birthday mark, is survived by two sisters, Mrs.! Nearly all of John L. Lewis' Mary Waters and Mrs. Kate dues payers stayed away from' the second consecu- Firemen Are Shown fighting a raging blaze at Magnolia oil refinery No. 1 in Port Worth, Texas, this morning. A terrific explosion which fire killed two men and injured eight. (A.P. Wire- photo to The Republican-Herald.) _______ Many nations today opened their banks and stock markets, ordered closed yesterday to curb specula-; tion, and waited cautiously for re- a Center, and'two nephews day. oil and re-import it for refining in the Canada, removing the last ob- stacle for construction line from Edmonton, A of a pipe- t0 Jensen Thursday at Military rites cial Pipe Line Company to export: two nieces. His body will be at! Coal-hauling railroads they funeral home until; are furloughing employes. a'm' I There were reports of violence in by and West virSinia- ran and'farm-1 Lewis remained silent. There j countries will have to cheap-jPerior, Wis, 'er near Alma Center. Funeral serv-! was no indication from U.M.W.J en their currency to meet BritishJ Trade Minister C. D. Howe will be at 2 p.m. Friday competition I the announcement in the House of the Hixton Presbyterian The Canadian dollar's value was Commons Monday. iThe Rev. Winslow Wilson slashed ten per cei.t last night.: The pipelines bill, passed at and buri That means tourists and buyers'last session of parliament, gave theiHixton cemetery, carrying American dollars in Can-j board of transport tne Jensen funeral home ada can get 110 Canadian cents I jurisdiction over the routing and! Friday noon. T.e walkout started after oper- for each U. S, bargain! location of pipelines. Mr. Randa'.s is survived by hisiators from the South refused to Vandenberg Pushes Arms Aid Proposal Washington Senator Van- Michigan ralied Repub- support behind the admin- program of foreign mili- today. Senate leaders U. N. Assembly Elects Romulo By Max Harrelson New Brigadier General Carlos P. Romulo of the Philip- pines was elected president of the United Nations assembly today. He immediately challenged the 59 delegations to make this "the peace Komulo was elected a few minutes after the assembly opened its fourth session in the packed blue and gold assembly chamber at Flusn- 1939 vote. With no organized opposition sight, senators said there is a good chance the issue will be decided that Canada hopes will boost her! Earlier this month, the board Mr. and Mrs. Frank Han-jcontinue paying 20-censs-a-ton W-lThursdav nossiblv even Wednesday export sales and tourist business, jproved the application of the In-ldais of Hixton; his wife and throe alty payments into the U.M.W. proeram a-e predict- The Netherlands devaluated Pipeline Company. aismau children; three fimrt guilder today, fixing the of Imperial turn Ethyl Dunn of Alma rate at 3.80 guilders to the of Standard Oil of Barna of Tucsi and ling Meadow park, site of the [world's fair, in Romulo got 53 of the 59 votes. The Soviet bloc cast five votes for Vladimir dementis, Czechoslo- vak foreign minister. The other guilde: It previously was 2.65 guilders. France cut her money loose from all franc-dollar controls with the permission to build the :Mrs. Hilda Hayes, Tomah, Wis. line. It was designed to carry oil] three sisters, Alma Center. Tucson, Ariz., andlwere forced to cut off the SlOO-a- ivirs.iweuare auu re.in.-ii.uui, iuuu. torj-heaw victory Mrs, Trustees of the fund said they, month pensions and other Vandenberg was one of the bigger lined up for the continuing ballot was declared invalid, Romulo pleaded for co-operation among the big powers. He said from Edmonton to Superior fromi idea of letting the free enterpriselwhere it would be shipped by tank- system determine how to Sarnia, Ontario, francs the U. S. dollar will bring. Government officials expected the franc to slide about six per cent: to a level of 350 to the dollar. recent rate has been 330 francs to'; a dollar. Slashes Vary Neither Canada nor France slashed their currency as drastical- ly as Britain. The dollar-short Brit- ish cut their pound per from S4.03 to a Hit at Crossing The accident occurred Monday at a.m. when the two men were i benefits to soft coal diggers. Lewis told the southern operators! they tion iSenate debate on the political conditions already were wrong in their of the contract June 3C Jury Acquits Georgia Judge j program for rearming friendly improving and it was the job is. the assembly to see that this !e has told friends that the Sen-1 trend continued, foreign relations and armed; nOpe this session will earn lor 'ices Five Directors Of New Group Announced Legal Consolidation Awaits Action Of Legislature By Adolph Bremer The governmental structure of the city of Winona, somewhat top heavy with 11 boards, has one less j for all practical purposes. The city council last night merged the membership of the park and recreation boards In the. interest of operating economy and because of the simiiarity of their activities. It was acting on the Initiative of the members of the two boards involved and the merger represents one of the first fruits of the city's new co-ordinating committee, which is composed of representatives of the city council and most of the 11 boards. The merger was accomplished by designating, in the ordinance estab- lishing the ten-year-old recreation board, that its membership shall be identical with the board of park commissioners. Keep Separate Records It is likely that, temporarily at least, the new five-man body will be known as the park-recreation board, for the lack of an official name, although legally both boards continue to exist. City Attorney S. D. J. Bruski said that in his opinion separate records must be kept and each board must have its own officers. However, it is presumed that the meetings of the two boards will be conducted simultaneously and that its officers will be identical. Complete legal consolidation of jthe functions and membership of I the two boards must await the next (session of the legislature, which j established the park board by a special act. This act does not now Anoka, Richard park board to adminis- Golling Signs New Complaint Golling, state public examiner, to day signed bribery complaints against an Anoka county commis- the functions now administer- Green Bay Western freight train ReE.ardless ot the walkout. Jo- which was coming into Alma Moody_ president of the 'ern coal producers, called Of Vandenberg has been, the administration for! Foe of Communism The 48-year-old Philippine diplo- ed by the recreation board. The merger was made last night Atlanta A superior court, when ter from Wisconsin Rapids. According to Coroner Jensen. the.rj.M.W. freight train dragged the car 640.adding: leet before it came to a stop. He, "if continued as it has been injMiddle" East. !is Foreign Minister said the car was wedged past, it will wreck both the! Republican Floor Leader Wherry'Evatt of Australia, the depot platform and the industry and the union Nebraska told reporters he u. N. officials listed .the What he has called a failure to carry mat, soldier and former newspa-! money from Doni-! fund a out a bipartisan approach in is known as a bitter foe of i jdealing with the Far East and the communism. The retiring president vjrf w.T nf thp sioner, and a former commissioner. by u_e city colmcll after Mayor Named in the complaints arejc Smith had presented resigna- Commissioner August Peterson frorn Former Commissioner Carroll Broad-! kers o{ bent. The complaints allege the Herbert V. cept the bid of the Ken S. of Marshall declared cracking plan for aid to Britain's leadership in V" the currency barriers; foi cman, hat in hand 'River Falls hospital. Both nounced dead by Mr. together with a Merrillan before depot attendants here that the 20-year-old i train had slowed down for its stop and was traveling at about 15 The was world." Moscow had a A Russian radio commentor clared that Britain had _ _ 1.1i TTnitori qtatps 'stepdaughter, Barbara. 6 Here's fst'of countries that. a 53-year-old former-lies per have devalued their currencies: Philadelphia lawyer was not in the.WJu Britain. South Africa, when the verdict wasjjaettamvi Vpniinrt :returned. He is attorney for Mrs. "S western New Zealand. Canada, .n Rfltlrials Australia, Egypt, Israel, India Burma, Ceylon, Denmark, Norway, Sweden. Iceland. Finland. Malaya, T ev-r and were driving lhere iwhen the accident happened. sician arrived at the accident pattern of creating a a few minutes after the crash. jtional emergency to force the to pay more for coal. }f the first violence Kentucky and West Vir- No one was badly hurt but 20 shots were reported fired 18 foreign Democratic" leaders to co-1ministers at the head of delega- push the'tions, prepared to tackle 72 sub- e. !jects already on schedule for de- Republicans said. Theyj Arguments, speeches, lators and decisions are expected I kins of Utah. Cain of keep tne deaegates here for is the old United MineJenner of Indiana and Kern of three months although U.N. Company, of St. Paul to sell a truck [to Anoka county. Tollinger was 'sales manager of the company. Amounts listed in the complaints are for Peterson and for Broadbent. The bribery is alleged !to have taken place some time be- Deceraber 10, 1947 and Jan- present five mem- recreation board and .Jtwo members of the park board. Membership Changed By agreement and by lot I among the nine men who consti- 'tuted the two boards, the mem- Municipal Judge Robert Johnson officials set November 30 hopefully as the date they should finish. The diplomatic cheer grew out of set bership of the park recreation board will be: C. W. Siebrecht, president of the park board; John Zywicki, vice-president of the park board and also a member of the recreation board; Lambert Kowa- lewski, park board member; Ber- nard H. Habeck, president of the recreation board, and Andrew Ge- Friday for a prelim- vice-president of the recrea- for Broadbprt No ooara. for Peterson" who is' Leaving public office by their (resignations yesterday to Mayor IX Dead at 54 in her divorce suit. On the witness stand the judge would admit only to and Holland. Lockwood. exclaiming, "If Sweden joined up with the other man was Justified I was. Scandinavian Norway and devalua- tion late yesterday. The Swedish crown was devalued to 5.18 to one dollar. The old rate was 3.60. The Dutch cabinet set a new rate for the guilder but held off an- nouncement of the new figure until later today. More Action Seen Pakistan also was expected to announce devaluation after a cab- inet meeting today. There was speculation in financial quarter? that several Latin American coun- tries doing business with Britain also would be forced to cheapen their money. Britain's Western hemisphere colonies were quick to feel the ef- fects of the mother country's deval- uation. In Trinidad, local banks fixed exchange rate on the British West Indies dollar at 58 and one-third, cents and the U. S. and Canadian dollars rose from S1.20 to a 71 per cent premium on the West Indies dollar. Many merchants in Jamaica had seen devaluation coming and bought dollars in advance. They expected the prices of such imports from dollar areas as flour, rice and other foodstuffs to rise immediate- ly. Jamaica's government tighten- ed its belt and banned all non-es- sential expenditures. Bermuda enjoyed a wave of buy- ing from American tourists as prices of such quality goods as doe- skin and cashmere fell below pre- war prices. shooting at pair a broken corn binder on West Virginia two tipple work- ____md a truck driver were beaten a strip mine operation. Thirteen Hollywood of Richard Dix. 54. Randals had picked up the re- s and a truck driver were beaten today of" tired blacksmith to help him re- J and Western delegates were waiting to get a look at the soviet- linger He was sentenced sound co-operation. ai'jnent. The United States Secretary ofjtrict Judge Leonard Xeyes to A frequent victim of heart attacks, State Dean Acheson said Vishinsky iyear prjson term. nk: truckloads of coal were dumped. suffered )lis fatal attack: in encouraging." "I am con-. In both instances bands ot August IQ. -while en route herelfident that we will all reach some from Now York by train. he added. Triirlr Hll close to President Truman said the Presi- dent has no intention of trying to '.halt the walkout for 30 or 60 days. Plenty of Coal Available The official, who asked anonym- ity, said Mr. Truman is determined let Lewis and the coal industry i "sweat out" their difficulties. I There are about tons I of coal above ground, enough to keep industry going anywhere from 40 to 60 days. However, in eastern Pennsylvan- ia's anthracite fields where diggers walked out, industry ers said the hard coal supply will, be choked off in from three days to frorn church sources said today. a week. Heavy runs on coal above] Tne report, given to correspondents here and enumerating at least ground already have developed. 30 arrests, was termed only a partial list. It said more arrests were Czechs Imprison Nuns and Priests Bv Richard Kasischke Mayor Smith told the council last that the five men were se- Dis-Uected in this manner: i ten! was first mutually agreed be- itween the two boards that Mr. Zywicki should continue, since his appointment to both boards a num- ber of years ago was the beginning of the recognition that the two boards had interests in common. Then the park board agreed its president should continue, too. Among the remaining three com- only ap- Potlsville. Pa. -dfl- A Reading j pointed last May: and passenger train crashed George-it was decided by lot that carrying 4500 callons the .latter two should resign, Kow- of gasoline at a grade crossing near was absent from Pottsville today. The gasoline last Friday when the decision By Train Explodes fronttaken in _ the. recreaUon Here's the state-by-state picture expected as the long-state-criurch land the number of idle miners: !fight neared a. showdown stage. servaats and subservient to West In one case the entire personnel the regime. vania, soft coal and 80.000 hard coal miners; 000; Ohio. 18.000: Kentucky, Alabama, 18'-! Illinois, (not including of a monastery was reported j frighten priests from carry- iseized. In another the staff of out the Vatican's excommuni- were taken, j cation decree and punish for trea- with their office printing son who do. equipment. Wsome cases the reasons for ar- sources observed: Indiana, Utah.jrests were not known. But, accord- Recounting recent arrests, church 4.300; Tennessee, Colorado, Washington, Arkansas- Oklahoma, Kansas-Missouri, New Mexico, Former La Crosse OPA Chief Dead It seems that the government truck. Pa., in eastern Pennsylvania. Killed was Clarence Goetz. remaining members of the park of Gap, Pa., driver of the gasoline j board will now meet and appomt j Habeck and Gesell to fill the un- j expired terms of Kobrer and i George. j "For all practical purposes." said the mayor, "these five men will take over both the functions of the park and recreation Staff and he believed that M. J. Bam- Air Crash Kills Pemberton Man Fairbanks, Alaska Sergeant Harold H. Bruss, 28, as- bene-c, _____. ___ the recreation director, "engineer from Pem-i would head one division, and Os- berton Minn was one of five1 car Tillman, the park supermten- has now given up its practise killed in last week's dent, would head the other division. paign was apparently a widespreadlpromises, cajolery and offers Of a C-47 transport plane crackdown instituted after offers of salary increases to the priests. Itiat Barter Island, Alaska, Ladd Air .salary increases and other blandish-j can be assumed after events of the Base officers reported here last 'rnents had failed to win the week that new waves of ar- night. Bruss' wife, Marian, lives! lover to the government's side inlrests are under way." in Fairbanks, the state-church controversy. I Among specific cases detailed The government has published the arrest of Father Julius .proposed church law, to be enacted j Veczey of Janik, in Slovakia, for 'by parliament this fall, to perform the wedding of over [a couple who were considered ex- Dividend Planned Minneapolis Directors of I the Minnesota Ontario Paper j Company yesterday authorized a quarterly dividend of 25 cents per share of common stock, payable Oc- tober 25 to shareholders of record September 30. Deaf Since Birth, Patty Wyant, five, utters a squeal Of delight as she recogfriizes the beat of a torn torn over the ear phones of an auditory training unit at Des Moines, Iowa. Cindy Cox, four, also deaf, beats the drum at rear. Youngsters who have lived in a world of silence since birth are taught to speak words like "mommy" and "daddy" and hear for the first time barking dogs and sound of a train whistle. In this training session, Patty is expected to knock each time she hears the beat of a drum. Both children have been training to hear for just a few weeks. (A.P. Wirephoto.) la. Crosse Wis H.iwould give the state power Griffin 60 former'Ladysnith drug-jail church appointments and admin-j communicated from the church be- gist, died iast night at a La Crossejistration hospital following a long illness. 2 at Chetek Killed At Rail Crossing As an example of the economy MERGER (Continued on Page 15, Column 6.) WEATHER According to churchmen the gov- Griffin operated a drugstore atierment's drive apparently iLadvsmith for 25 years before.mov-'three major objectives: J_ __ _ T _ I 1 Tit Vifcua nn Q had ling here. He served as La Crosse! iarea OP.A. director from 1943 tojtions network up by a commuraca- which priests cause they supported the ment-sponsored Catholic movement. 11945. maintain contact with Archbishop! Funeral services will be Thursday! Josef Beran and the other bishops, arr Ladysmith. Surviving are his 2-To break priests; resistance to T Meanwhile reports reached Prague that a local communist of- ficial had been killed by angry peasants in Moravia following the Chetek, Wis. Two me: killed instantly teSay when their automobile was struck by a Chicago and. North Western passen- I at i widow. of a Catholic priest. The news stirred speculation. Maude, and one proposed new church civil law whether fresh peasant uprisings are FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and vicinity: Fair tonight land Wednesday. Not quite so cool 'tonight. Low tonight 46; high Wed- nesday 68. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24; hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 70; minimum 41; noon, ger train at a grade crossing one mile south of here. The victims were Roy A. Huset, 53 and Gilbert Nelson, 57, employes 170; precipitation, none; sun sets to- of'a Chetek lumber yard. The at sun rises tomorrow at was coming into Chetek en IMTS, B. J. O'Connor, Denver, Colo.iwhicn would make all churchmen I brewing. jto Superior. Additional weather on Page 15.   

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