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Winona Republican Herald: Thursday, September 8, 1949 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - September 8, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              WARMER TONIGHT, FRIDAY VELVET VOICE OF RADIO VOLUME 49, NO. 172 THURSDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 8, 1949 FIVE CENTS PER COPY TWENTY-FOUR PAGES Twins Perish in Augusta, Wis., Fire Britain Seeks Highway Business, Routes To Be Taken Over by Mid-Continent Airlines, Inc., of Kansas City if its application now pending before the Civil Aeronautics board is granted, are studied by a group of persons in Winona last night to discuss the matter. Stand- ing, left to right, are Roy T. Patneaude, co-man- ager of the Winona Municipal airport; Robert Cline. chairman of the air progress committee of the La Crosse Chamber of Commerce; William A. Galewski, co-manager of the Winona Municipal airport, and seated, left to right, Mayor Cy Smith of Winona; L. L. Schroeder, state commissioner of aeronautics; A. J. Lobb, president of the Roches- ter airport; Hugh W. Coburn, Kansas City, vice- president in charge of traffic and sales for Mid- Continent Airlines, and Fred E. Steele, La Crosse city attorney. Republican-Herald photo Sale of More Goods in U. S. Drastic American Tariff Reductions Under Discussion Chappeil Tells County Board con- Taxpayers Group Asks Construction On Contract Basis By Gordon Holte The acutely tax-conscious Wino- la Taxpayers association Wednes- requested the Winona county t i board of commissioners to consid- with an urgent appeal to enlarge the abandonment of all hlghway Amencan markets for British I and road both new goods. construction and Sir Stafford Cripps, chancellor it all on a contract basis, the exchequer and his spokesman in the three-power the commissioners dur- nomic talks under way here on ing their regular September ses- Britam's economic crisis, did notjsion in the county courthouse yes- specify how this might be accom- terday afternoon, plished. Chappeil remarked that Presumably he has in mind dras- "when the voters elect a commis. By John M. Hiphtowcr Washingion Britain fronted the United States tic tariff reductions by the United i States. Cripps focused virtually his whole lease for American aid in stabilizing sioner, they usually give little or no consideration to his qualifi- cations as a road builder. How- ever, it appears that this has de- 3 Cities Plan Joint Plea for Air Service Miss America Preliminaries Gel Under Way Britain's finances on his request jveloped into one of the most im- to "enlarge our opportunities of portant functions of the commis- earning dollars." I He made the same appeal to Ca- inada. Canadian Finance Minister Douglas Abbott, backing up Cripps' request for readjustments in basic port: sioners' work and it is" our con- viction that this is a costly edu- cation for the county." Referring to the recent report by State Public Examiner Richard A. j American economic policy, declar-1 Coiling which listed 11 instances of led that Canada stands ready to alleged bribery in connection with do what it can. Secretary of Treasury Snyder, the American spokesman, promis- county board equipment purchases, Mr. Chappeil observed that "in view of the recent unfortunate oc- Winona, Rochester and La Crosse will present a joint brief before I UI1UGI T? Of tojcurrences in our county and with the CM Aeronautics board in Washington, D. C., September 28, urging! WIIWVI IIWJ suggestions made by Cripps appointment of new members that thP annllf-atior of Mid Continent Airl nes Inc of Kansas Citv to [Abbott for arresting the dram the board, it appears appropri- take tte amhorized Atlantic City. X. dollar reserves and at least to present the sub- Air Lines Inc., East St. Louis. 111., be granted.' ihard-working Miss America to balance Britain's worldjject for your consideration even If the application is approved, it will mean that Mid-Continent testants face a busy time of it tj s der without sufficient facts to will service Winona and La Crosse and expand its present service in by March orj April. 1950. Decision to intervene in the case) on behalf of the Mid-Continent sys-! tern was re- :hed at a dinner meet-j ing at the Hotel Winona last night, I attended by airport groups of the! three cities, officials of the Mid- Continent lines and L. L, Schroeder, state commissioner of aeronautics, A long discussion about the mer- its of the case, the ability and "willingness" of Mid-Continent to give this area service on the pro- posed Chicago-Twin Cities route, took place last night, Host at the session was the Wi- nona Association of Commerce and ieared Bermuda today while a Mexi- Severe Storm Near Bermuda Hot in West, 108 at Glendale By The Associated Press A large and severe hurricane The conferees meet-a gain today day in preparation for the second Inewed his emphasis on the Ameri- round of preliminary contests. j can position that Marshall plan aid The 52 beauties culled from end in 1952 and that Britain's cream of the nation's crop began J major need is to become self-suf- their day at a. m., (C.S.T.) at ficient by that time. a breakfast conference with contest judges on their personality qualities. Personality is one of the four con- siderations in selecting finalists for ithe Saturday night showdown. At p. m. the girls report to 'convention hall for an arduous re- jhearsal of tonight's second prelim- Subject of Study "However, it is hoped that the suggestions contained may be made a subject of study in order that improved policies can be for- mulated." to assign among committees Mr. Chappeil explained that the fie subjects ior detailed study. taxpayers' association was organ- i Later today Cripps and British [ized with two purposes in mind: Foreign Minister Bevin are meet with President Truman. to I reduction of the tax burden which, Ithe association contends, "has be- Canadian Finance Minister Ab- come very oppressive in this com- bott asked yesterday that bagiclmunity" and to assist with sug- Unary in the bathing suit, talent, and American economic policies be suggestions which might result in! evening gown divisions. idied "to determine whether theyjmore value per dollar expended. Their afternoons are free forjare appropriate" to this country'sj He pointed out that "this is a sightseeing or position of leadership inj sizeable assignment and before erones. But no dates, rules don't allow it. Mother Asleep In Adjoining Room Saves 2 Fire Damage Confined to Part of House Roy T. Patneaude, co-rnanagcr of the Winona Muncipal airport, pre- sided. Other airlines which have ap- plied for the Parks routes include Eastern Airlines, Wisconsin Cen can hurricane brought storm wam- In the first preliminary last night, Miss Arizona and Miss Call- Contest: the western world. j anything worthwhile can be accom- 1 He said he had in mind not only plished, considerable inquiry and the maintenance of high levels of i statistical information, is required. tral Airlines and Chicago SoutB-'east of the British-owned resort em. It was emphasized, however, because Mid-Continent already is a ings along the Southern Californlalfornia tied for first place in "but coast. bathing- suit The center of the Atlantic hurri- cane was expected to hit near the employment and income inside thisi also the question! Road, Bridjre Fund "At nearly every tax board meet- colony, 600 miles off the Carolina The Mexican hurricane, with 100 regional carrier, is the only an hour winds, was expected fo_ Gloria yvonjle Burk. which has shown great interest be centered about 20 miles 19] Mmnesota. The re_ .the Chicago-Twin Cities route and Vieso by midnigh, tonight. tiri BeBe shoppi presented was the first to apply for the Weather bureau forecast wjth the lden troph Both systen-, it was -the logical one and rough seas along the' classmates at West High support at the Washington hearing.; Southern California coast today. Minneapoiis. I Q The Tri-Cities will be represent-! Record breaking temperatures hit i Judges no winner New division. They are i whether tariff policy, policy during- the past year, some dis- Jacque Mercer, 18, of Litchfield, garding customs administration, po-jcussion occurred in connection with and 19-year-old Jone Ann licy regarding foreign investment, I county particularly Pederson of Santa Rosa, Calif. i policy regarding the distribution of those under the heading of the road The two girls nudged out 18 otherlthe financial burden of political re- and bridge and a complete entries in the bathing suit class, 'sponsibilities in various parts of investigation of the policies of Wi- Sultry violin renditions of Gypsy the world, is appropriate to the pre-jnor'a county was about to be un- ifnn rfnam ir, fVio toiorif oonf inim-yiafi rtrri i dfirtflken." he said. He added that airs hands down in the talent for Gloria Yvonne Burk- The U.S.S. Task pulls into pier at the U. S. submarine base at Groton, Conn., with survivors of .the U.S.S. Cochino that burned and sank in the Arctic late in August, as anxious relatives wait to greet them. (A.P. Wirepboto to The Republican-Herald.) Richard Famed Composer, Dead at 85 sent international position. Sonja Henie "ported. The Gannisch Partenkirchen, Ger- .many Richard Strauss, one the appointment of two new mem- bers to the county board made the worlds greatest expedient for the association to composers, died today. He was 85. Steele, La Crosse city high of 103. The Weather bureau Sonja Henie, However, contestants will get point [blond skating star, and Winthrop Credits i i scoring. bring the matter before the board at the present time. During the next year, the county board has earmarked nearly one- third of its total' tax levy for road and bridge construction and main- V _ _ 1flft at U1U11U SLttl, UilU WlllLliiUp mann. manager of the La soared to 108 at Glendale jCredlts in tnis toward tne Jr and aviation, 4U u Chamber of Commerce, Fred [executive, plan to be married a weekL theh aPProved I from today the board at lis Julv meeting, It will be the second marriage Whic5 would Miss Henie, and the fourth has been designated for _ ItVvIC Don Swenson, manager of the Ro- chester airport, Dwight Havens, manager of the Rochester Cham- ber of Commerce, J. M. George, reported a high of 81 at San Fran- 1 Cisco, the hottest September 7 since' 1922. Warm weather also continued in I Suffocates Winona attorney and Winona As-! the southern states but it was cool[ sociation of Commerce airpor over most of the northern part of committeeman, Mr. Patneaude and the country from the Rocky moun-i Harold J. Doerer, president of the Winona Association of Commerce, St. Paul John, her four- c son, suffocated in his tains eastward to the Atlantic sea-If board. Temperatures dipped into a the 30's in parts' of Minnesota andl? y ter. i was away from home moments, leaving the was appointed to prepare the ar- guments1, and make arrangementsjNorth Dakota early today for representation at Washington.! Confident of Service i_. _ is going to get airline 013lip KltK Mr. Patneaude said lUIIV VI U4ll IllltJ opening the meeting, "whether itj be Mid'-Continent or someone else, IT but we feel Mid-Continent is the j In logical line and we hope and La Crosse will join us in ur- ging that the Mid-Continent appli- sisseton, S. charred I cation be granted." bodies of three Nebraskans were Others at the meeting in addi- found last night in the wreckage tion to those named above their plane on a ranch 15 miles] James Burkhead, Rochester, cityjSouth of Sisseton. sales manager for Elroy Baxter, deputy sheriff, said William F. Holden, chairman of (papers indicated the victims were the aviation committee of the Benson, his son Ronald, 18, nona ciiy council: S. D. J. Bruski. and Arnold P. Isaacson, all of Polk, Winona city attorney; Verne Arm- Neb. Isaacson's name was on a strong assistant manager of thejstudent pilot's license and a plane Winona municipal airport; W. P.I ownership certificate bore Benson's. Theurer president of the Winona! At Polk, Marshal Dave Eckdahl citv council' Frank W. Snow and'said the trio had left ten days ago Harold Thompson of a fishing trip to Canada and Frank Muth manager of the La were to have returned Tuesday. Crosse airport: Robert Cline, chair- Benson, 46, was a farmer, his son man of the air progress commit-! a student at the University of Ne- tee of the La Crosse Chamber ofjbraska. Isaacson, 52, was a banker. Commerce; A. J. Anderson, mana- trer of the Winona Association of Commerce; A. J. Lobb, president m care of her His genius ran the gamut of mu- sical expression from simple songs and chamber music to symphonic poems, symphonies and operas. "Der Rosenkavelier" and his impression- istic opera "Salome" are among his most popular works. He was a musical prodigy at the age of four and began composing when he was six. At 12 his Opus No. 1, a "festmarsch" for orchestra was before the public. Impressionistic expressions in tone form which Strauss composed] in middle life were the subject of! critical debate. He lived to see! owner of the New York Yankees, i (Continued on Paje 3, Column 5.) many of his innovations become I Gardiner. [this Announcement of the wedding! .with the gasoline tax distribu-1 plans was made yesterday by a money from the state and oth- _.. _. f I lie relations firm. state and federal aids, the total Miss Henie's marriage to Daniel available for road and Reid Topping, tin plate heir andjbrldere work 1S expected to reach ended in divorce. COUNTY BOARD Leo Miotke, a sheep herder on the ranch of Frank Whip- pie, discovered the wreckage 24 nf the Rochester airport and for-jhours after the ship was believed mer chairman of the Metropolitanlto have crashed. He reported hear- Airnorts commission in the Twin ling a plane fly above him dose to Titles- Wendell McEldowney, air [the ground during a heavy fog DTOeress committee of the La [Tuesday but heard nothing indi- Crossp Chamber of Commerce it was in trouble. Frank E SISSOH. La Crosse civic! Baxter said parts of the four- leader' Hugh W. Coburn, Kansasjplace plane were scattered for 300 citv vice-president in charge feet, indicating it struck the ground traffic and sales for full power and caught fire, and William A. Galewski, Civil Aeronautics inspector from the Winona municipal air-l Huron was to view the wreckage ager 01 tnrtov almost commonplace musical de- vices. His tone poems, "Till Eulenspie- "Don Quixote" and "Don Ju- an" are popular with symphonic au- diences throughout the world. He composed "Salome'' in 1904 and pro- duced the opera "Elektra" three years later. Both works were wide- ly known in America. "Tod und (Death and Transfiguration) a tone poem j written in 1889 is regarded by many critics as one of his greatest works. Strauss had suffered from chronic heart disease for several months. His daughter-in-law, Mrs. Alice Strauss said: "He died In November, 1933 Strauss was] i chosen by Nazi Propaganda Minis- iter Paul Joseph Goebbels as presi- jdent of the nazi "music chamber." Early in 1934 he presided over a convention of German composers who resolved that German musical accomplishment could be lifted to Beloit Brick Plant Burns, Loss Beloit, explosion- produced fire destroyed a brick in- dustrial plant here last night with damage estimates running into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. The flames, rising from the main greater heights under the influence Taylor Freezer Corporation plant to) Augusta, Wis. The 20- month-old twins of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Ruck died today in a fire which swept their bedroom. i (Augusta is on U. S. highway 12, ,19 miles southeast of Eau Claire.) The mother, asleep in the ad- joining living room, said she awoke ,to find the interior of both rooms' j ablaze. She said she attempted to enter the bedroom'occupied by little Judy Marie and Jack Lee, but was driven back by flames. Two Saved She ran upstairs and returned with two other children, Dean, eight, and Robert, three. The younger child scampered back to his room, retrieved his pet teddy bear and returned uninjured. Two neighbors, William Korth and Ivan Bann, heard Mrs. Ruck's screams for help and summoned the fire department. The crew broke a window in the infants' room and came within a yard of their beds before being driven away by flames. Father Away The father was at the home of a brother-in-law near Fall Creek, helping to build a barn. The blaze charred the living room and downstairs bedroom, but other rooms were less severly damaged. State Fire Marshall William Rohne said cause of the fire was not determined. U. S. Approves Multi-Million i Yugoslav Loan Washington Diplomatic of- ficials said today they understood the Export-Import bank has ap- proved a multi-million dollar loan to Yugoslavia. The amount was reported to be around The money would be used mainly to buy ma- chinery and equipment needed by Yugoslav copper, lead and zinc mines. The credit would be the first di- rect American, loan to the Yugo- slav government since Marshal Tito broke with Moscow about 15 months ago. has been pressing an j application for a loan for about three weeks. Secretary of State Acheson is known to have strongly supported the application. He argued that it was "a calculated risk" necessary ,to bolster Yugoslavia's economy and strengthen Tito as a symbol of in- dependence from Moscow's orders. Yugoslavia proposes to repay the i loan with dollars earned through shipments of lead, zinc, and copper 'to the United States. i These raw materials are all be- i'ing stockpiled by the United States for an emergency. Daughter Born To S. D. Quad Aberdeen, S. D. Jean, one of the famed Schense quadruplets of South Dakota, is married and the mother of an 18-day-old daughter, Deborah. Until it was confirmed last night by a relative, Jean's marriage to Harold Schlossur, Frederick, S. D., i farm youth, was a secret. Present- separated from her mate, Mrs. 'Schlosser is living at the home of i her father. Fred A. Schense, in northern Brown county. Jean's brothers, Jay and James, are also still on the farm but plan- ning to attend business school after fall work is over. Joan, the fourth quad, is attending a Minneapolis beauty school on a scholarship she received en her 18th birthday, last January 13. of nazi discipline. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS Rutledge's Left- Side Paralyzed light up much of the city for two hours, were brought under control about midnight. Firemen then train- ed their hoses on a few walls that _ _ remained upright. T Mame-W-Supreme court Fire Chief Glenn Davis said early Justice Wiley B. Rutledge's entire today the damage probably amount- left Winona and vicinity: Fair to between and somewhat warmer tonight; low possibly as high as Friday increasing cloudiness and [Earlier, T. A. Strayer, a, firm of- affected by paralysis re- sulting from a cerebral hemorrhage. This was disclosed last night by the 55-year-old jurist's physician. port. (today. Members Of Farm Group making a "fanners' friendship tour of Europe" are grouped on the deck of the liner He de France at New York before sailing today. They will visit ten countries to get acquaint- ed with European farmers and then-, represented in the group include Wisconsin, Iowa, Illinois, Indians, Michigan and Missouri (AP. Wirephoto to The Republican-Herald.) warmer; high 77. LOCAL WEATHER Official observations for the 24 hours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 69; minimum, 47; noon, 68; precipitation, trace; sun sets to- night at sun rises tomorrow at Additional weather on page 21. ficial, made an informal estimate Dr- Elmer Tower also said the jus- of damage. still is in the slightly improved Davis said the blaze started when condition of the past few days, but an automatic gas water heater ex-1 his "basic condition remains un- ploded in the plant, which manu- changed." He is a patient at York factures industrial equipment. Stock, and chemicals were ruined. Firemen saved some office records and files. refrigerating i hospital. The justice was stricken August 27 while driving his car here from Ogunquit, where he had been vaca- tioning.   

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