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Winona Republican Herald Newspaper Archive: July 23, 1949 - Page 1

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   Winona Republican-Herald, The (Newspaper) - July 23, 1949, Winona, Minnesota                              PARTLY CLOUDY TONIGHT, SUNDAY VOLUME 49, NO. 133 WINONA, MINNESOTA, SATURDAY EVENING, JULY 23, 1949 FM RADIO IS PERFECT RADIO FIVE CENTS PER COPY FOURTEEN PAGES School Building Levy Delay Asked Labor Rule Perils Britairif Aids Reds, Churchill Charges Wolverhampton, England Winston Churchill asserted today that the British Labor 'government has led Britain "into imminent peril" of communism and national bankruptcy. The conservative party leader said an economic collapse is looming which would "carry many other nations with us into chaos and com- munism." In a major policy speech at a party rally at the Wolyerhampton football stadium, Churchill declared the socialists have failed to put forth an effective plan to meet the danger. The Alsops Siam Set To Yield Taft Urges Delay in Arms For Europe Suggests Draft Of Common-Defense Program First By Jack Bell Washington Senator Taft! (R-Ohio) and Smith (R-N.J.) call-j ed on the administration today to) delay its foreign arras program until the new North Atlantic coun- cil drafts common defense plans. Smith, who voted for the security treaty when the Senate ratified it Thursday, told a reporter he doesn't believe there should be "piecemeal action'" on rearming Western Eur- opean signers of the pact. "I hope the administration will i woman and child in this famous i delay submitting any arms program until the defense committee, to be The wartime prime minister's ad- dress came on the heels of the Con- servative party's state- ment of policy entitled the "right road for which was pub- lished last night. "They have squandered the re- serves and resources which had i been gathered in the said the 174-year-old wartime prime min- ister, "and have darkened and nar- rowed the future of every man, By Stewart Alsop 'better postwar comeback than Bri- Bangkok, Siam Like almost _ even beaten Germany and 9 of the treaty, can canvass the needs and agree upon an over-all! Drop Ten-Mill Rate, Taxpayers Association Asks The Winona Taxpayers association is asking the board of educa- tion to remove the ten-mill building fund levy from its 1950 tax levy. Winoca members of the association's board of governors requested the action in a statement mailed today to the board of education. An additional levy for the building fund "should definitely be post- poned until some definite building program has been studied and adopt- ed, and until some reUef has been obtained from the over-assessment and tax burden now borne by the taxpayers of the city of the asso- ciation said in the statement. The complete statement follows: We, the board of governors of Winona Taxpayers association, note jthat on July the Winona board of education adopted an operating I budget of and voted for a ten-mill levy amounting to lit is, therefore, apparent that the total amount to be devoted to school ipurposes is not as reported in newspaper What particularly concerns us is the ten-mill levy for the building fund. Without in any .way attempting to dictate to or infringe upon the prerogatives of the Winona school board, as representatives of Winona taxpayers we would respectfully urge that the Winona school board re- consider such levy for reasons hereinafter set forth: The following table with which you are very familiar, shows the in- crease in school operating budgets over a three-year period: Budget for Winona City Schools Budget This Is The Remains of the barn and milk- house on the Matt Siebenaler farm in Bohri's valley near Fountain City which was destroyed Gene Johnson photo by fire Friday afternoon. Loss was estimated at The fire was still smoldering this aft- ernoon. Fifty-five tons of hay burned. I defense he said. a man of some distinction and real intelligence. Yet he looked, like all Siamese, about half his age, as he sat In a window seat wriggling his bare toes, laughing and telling jokes. Reluctantly, an attempt was made to introduce a serious -note into the conversation. What would An tickets for the be likely to happen, the former i arena of .this midland's industrial everything else In this ______p_..... country, the interview had a dis-j Bids for Power Taft, who voted against theiDjkL tinct low comedy flavor. The Siam-j Churchill told his listeners said ln a separate interview; Klin Fl C ese was one of Siam's large col-jcure for this country's condition is he Agrees be a study UVIII I J W lection of former prime ministers, j to "return to a system which pro- vldes Incentives for effort, self-de- nial, initiative and good house- keeping." And he promised that the Con- servatives will apply the cure if they are restored' to power in the next general election, which musti be held between now and mid-1950. of the needs of the European coun-j tries before Congress is asked to act.. Meanwhile, diplomatic authorities! said mid-September is the earliest date the council can meet to draft common defense plans, because of time needed for advance prepara- tions. Barn Burns; Loss Aquatennial Parade Attracts Big Crowd 1948-49 1949-50 School School Budget Budget General control Instruction Operation of plant Maintenance of plant........ Auxiliary agencies Fixed charges Capital outlay To survey To increase working balance Adopted Operational July 11, Budget 1949, for Adopted 1950-51 May 10, Fiscal 1949 Tear 533300 The following table shows the budget for the city of Winona as com- Minneapolis Minneapolis' annual salute to Budget for the City of Winona its first high point today with a parade marked by! cjjy Schools Premier was asked, if Indo-China as well as China fell to the com- munists, and pressure was then brought on Slam? He giggled. "We cave he said, giggling merrily. Despite the giggles, this predic- tion was probably a perfectly ac- curate one, as things now stand, in the view of the best observers here. For many years. Siam has been the only independent state in Southeast Asia. For all these years Siam has maintained its independ- ence, not by fighting for it, but by a carefully calculated policy of caving in when caving in seemed sensible. THE MOST RECENT cave-in oc- curred during the war. "Field Mar- shal" Fhibul Songgram was pre- mier then as now. When the Jap- anese attack seemed imminent, he were sold out for Churchill's address, which was. billed as the planned to send his foreign military aid plans to Con- gress yesterday, but their delivery to Capitol hill was postponed until campaign, Wolverhampton, a sprawling com- munity of is 15 miles from the steel center of Birmingham. Churchill the trip from London by plane. The statement pledges to halt so- cialism at home and communism the world over. To Debate Policy At a London conference in Octo- ber the Conservatives will debate the policy statement and build a platform on it for next year's elec- tion. The election date has not been set but it will be some time before the asked the British what help heiLabornreglme ends its term could expect. The hard pressed !July 26> 1950' British responded with a stirring In a policy pamphlet the Conserv- message from Winston Churchill, jatives state this creed: but no arms and no men. Premier j "Experience abroad shows the Phibul promptly arranged a deal with the Japanese, which permit- ted Siam to avoid bloodshed, to re- tain a considerable measure of in- ternal independence and to escape most of the disagreeable conse- quences of Japanese occupation. Phibul served a brief term in (Continued on Page 9, Column 6.) creation of a socialist state prepares the way to communism, Platform Dishonest, Attlee Tells Miners Durham, England Prime Minister Attlee today called the new Conservative party platform "one ALSOP 115 U, S. Pilgrims Journey to Shrine Montreal Traveling in wheelchairs and on crutches 115 American pilgrims of the Roman Catholic faith went to Westmount mountain Friday to pray in St. Jo- seph's oratory. Their journey of faith will take them ns far as St. Anne de Beaupre, 20 miles from Quebec citv on the north shore of the St. Lawrence river. For many, the pilgrimage is "a j renewal of faith." A 60-year-old man, victim of po- liomyelitis when a boy, said that although he was used to being an invalid, "these trips always make: me feel better It's wonderful to see sill the people who believe they can be helped, and I always pray that they will, too." The pilgrims are .members of the Confraternity of Pilgrims of Ameri- ca of which James Cardinal Mc- Gigan, archbishop .of Toronto, and Msgr. Joseph Charbonneau, arch- bishop of are honorary presidents. They come chiefly from Minnesota, Kentucky, Iowa and Il- linois. A detachment of Montreal police- men escorted the crippled visitors from their special train to Brother Andre's shrine where they were wel- comed by Msgr. L. P. Whelan, aux- iliary bishop of Montreal. U. of W. Plans Prep Music Clinic Madison, Wis. An all-state high school chorus and orchestra j clinic, to begin Tuesday, attracted a registration of 225 pupils, the Uni- versity of Wisconsin reported today. Sessions will continue until Au- gust 15. Classes will be held daily for 108 choristers and 117 orchestra mu- sicians. Fountain City, Wis. Fire which destroyed the barn and milkhouse on Matt Siebenaler's farm in Bohri's valley Friday af- ternoon "was still smoldering in the rubble .arid ashes of'an entire hay- crop- .this afternoon. Loss .in the" fire, Including five calves, one bull, a new milking machine and separator, 55 tons of nd officr items in a j reportedly a desire to avoid strength- ening the_ hand of senators seeking to cut foreign economic aid funds in the midst of Senate debate on that program. Besides a message outlining his plans for sending arms to Western Europe, Mr. Truman will send along a bill authorizing him to conduct the arms plan. It was reported that the bill, will specifically state that _ the prdvision of the atomic act, which forbids this government Fi the barn, was estimated at S7.500lthe Army air force. beauty, celebrities and dignitaries. A promise of fair and mild weather overflowed the downtown pa- rade more than spectators, Aquatennial officials said. W. N. Dickson, Aquatennial president, declared that the 43 floats, 29 bands, 26 drum and bu gle corps and dozens of marching units will give the parade "greater spectator attraction'than ever be- At the lead, flanked by an escort and honor guard, will be Vice- president Alben W. Barkley and General James Williams, head of by .insurance adjusters. i Close behind will be- Senator DaVidl s01? of H. Humphrey and Congress- fe Roy Weir, Walter H. Judd p. m. and the alarm wasiand Harold C Hanen all of Min- rwa u au OI ivun to send atomic explosives abroad, will not be changed by the arms legislation. Such a legislative provision in the foreign arms legislation would tend to reassure those in Congress hav- ing recently voiced fears that Mr. Truman may want to give A-bombs to Britain. At Los Angeles last night, Dr. Lawrence R. Hafstad, director of reactor development for the Atomic Energy commission, told the Insti- tute of Aeronautical Sciences that Canada now has the world's most advanced atomic a device for the controlled release of atomic energy. from the surrounding area responded when the news of the fife spread, but were unable to do more than protect the granary and corn crib which were 'close to the barn.- The Fountain City fire depart- ment arrived on the scene at about p. m. but the flames were uncontrollable at that time. Hosc-s were run to a nearby creek and water pumped onto the two buildings closest to the flaming barn. Four men, Daniel Diel and Ralph, Euben, neighboring farmers, him. As the crowd surged Orville A.bts and Fire Chief Wil-j toward the plane, several persons liam Stoli from the Fountain City I were pushed to the ground, includ- fire department, stayed at the sceneling a Hennepin county deputy sher- until 6 a. m. this morning to keep jiff. None was injured seriously.. nesota. Mayors Eric G. Hoyer, Minnea- polis, Edward K. Delaney, St. Paul and Fernando Chiriboga Village- iatest developments of the Mickey Four Arrested In Mickey Cohen Shooting Case Los Angeles Four men, three in San Francisco and one tiere, were taken into custody today and one man was released in the mez of Quito, Ecuador will be shooting. the line of maToh. Bog Hope and Arthur will belT on hand, as well as Charles Tarantmo, editor of a Holly- burn, BeBe Shopp, Miss America San Francisco police Expenses (Other than Schools) April, 1948, to April, 1949 April, 1949, to April, 1950 and School BIdg. Fund Total Budget Increase or decrease (In other words, the cost of government other than schools was cut by but school costs increased by About one-third of our taxes goes for schools and the schools and school building fund combined did as much as all other city govern- mental functions.) In the recent revaluation Winona property was over-assessed when compared with other cities and there is little hope of overcoming the situation before 1950, the next even-numbered year, any relief therefrom not occurring until 1951. We give you below the figures showing where the increase (occasioned by said revaluation) was distributed. Distribution of Taxes Levied in City of Winona on Real and Personal Property Total Taxes Levied Winona City of 1948, and Mary Druey, Minne- sota Centennial queen. When Hope arrived at Wold Chamberlain airport from Chicago last night an estimated wel- of the most dishonest documents I have ever read.' Speaking at an annual gathering jof English miners', Attlee said the j Conservative program announced jthis morning and being amplified I at Wolverhampton today by Party 1 Leader Winston Senator Taft, in urging a study j watch on the smoldering hay. Queens from throughout Minne- of the armament needs of European, Twenty-one head of cattle were In members of the Atlantic alliance I the pasture at the time. No other a great piece j dressing." of window before sending them arms, said: "I am in favor of giving arms to Greece and Turkey, and I might even vote to turn over some surplus equipment to some of the treaty signers, but I'm certainly opposed crops were stored in tne barn. Cause of the fire or what part of the building it started in was undetermined. The Siebenaler's, witn their two children, David and Patricia, 15, hour performance will be broad- sota, from the Dakotas an'd Wis- consin, will also have places in the parade. Hope will be starred tonight in a gala Aquatennial show to be staged at the municipal audi- in City of Winona arrested For 1947, payable in 1948 For 1948, in 1949 State's Share County's Share City's Share Schools' Share wood film trade publication; Hy Porter, his San Francisco sentative, and Joseph Tenner, Sanllncrease Francisco night club owner. They were picked up at the re- quest of Sheriff Eugene Biscailuz of Los Angeles county and bookedj "en route to Los Angeles" for ques- tioning. Meanwhile, one of three other men named by Sheriff Biscailuz asj wanted for questioning in the was apprehended here today. He Is Tony Brancato, ex-convict once queried in the Bugsy Siegel slaying two years ago. Another of the trio, Joseph E. Messina, 35, prize fight manager, torium. Thirty minutes of the two-jwho surrendered yesterday, was re- to. any all-out program that will farm 100 acres seven miles from (cast. Cedric Adams, Minneapolis, start a world arms race." I Fountain City. will be master of ceremonies. Also on tonight's program is the water show "the Aqua follies." It is being presented at the Wirth park pool nightly during the Aqua- tennial. Swift Wage Talks End at La Crosse La Crosse, Wis. Negotia- tions between union and manage- ment in the Swift and Company strike here were broken off yester- day when union representatives re- jected a company offer. When The Goodyear Blimp Mayflower landed at the Winona municipal airport at noon today after circling the city for half an hour, members of the crew were greeted by officials of the Boland Manufacturing Company of this city which makes a plastic raincoat out of a Goodyear product. In. the picture, left to right, are Lawrence Boland, a vice-president of the Boland company, Russell Boland, company vice-president shaking hands with Verner L. of the blimp pilots, Mrs. Sarah Goyanes, Boland office manager, and J. T. Beckley, an official of the Goodyear com- pany. Each of the 12 members of the Mayflower crew was presented with a Boland raincoat. Jack Boettner, chief pilot, remained at the controls while the blimp stopped here. A bus, service truck and ground crew to aid in landings accompanies the blimp. The ship came here from La Crosse where it spent the night and departed at noon for Minneapolis to fly over _the Aquatermial pa- rade. A crowd was at the airport to watch the Mayflower land. Repablican-Herald photo Northwest Caught With Blankets Down By The Associated Press What is so rare as a night in July when the mercury drops to 35 degrees in Minnesota or Wis- consin? That's what the man says. It was three degrees above freez- ing last night at Land O'Lakes, Wis. As a matter of fact, says Federal Weatherman Howard J. Thompson, most of the state was caught with its blankets down. Blair had a 49 mark, Dalton had 50 and other read- ings generally were in the low 50's. An exception'was along the immediate Like shore where temperatures were considerable Milwaukee's 64. Highest temperature under yesterday's clear skies was 84 at Prairie du Chien. More fair skies today with warmer temperatures except along bake Michigan, says Thompson. Bat scattered thun- dershowers arc predicted for to- night and Sunday. leased after intensive questioning. "His alibi will stand up for the time said Sheriff's Inspector Gordon" Bowers. Gambler Cohen and three other persons, including an attorney gen- eral's agent assigned to guard him, were wounded by heavy shotgun slugs as they emerged early Wed- nesday from a night club at a movie colony playground called the Sun- set Strip. William Hall, Messina's attorney, said his client could account for ail his movements the morning of the attempted assassination and that he didn't know Cohen or the other two men named by the sheriff. "This is a 'surprise to Mes- sina told the officers. "I had noth- ing to do with the shooting." Biscailuz obtained the names of Youngdahl Fight To Oust Foster Hits Stalemate Messina and Brancato from At- of Arkansas. the governor. And the governor apparently was helpless in the matter unless he should decide to instigate criminal proceedings against Mr. Foster. Background of the case Friday night was this: Earlier this week, the governor demanded Foster's ouster on grounds ie had omitted official minutes of the board's action in authorising purchase of Arkansas state bonds The board made a secret commit- ment with the Charles A. Fuller tompany, Minneapolis investment Inn, previous to the firm's acqulsi- ;Ion of the bonds from the state It is our feeling that the tax- payers are very much in accord with the pay as .you go school build- ing plan and we understand a sur- vey is being made of the school situation in Winona. Until such time as the survey is in and has been studied, it seems there is little need to increase the school building fund. HistoriaaUy, that school sink- ing fund was established about 20 years ago at which time it was stated there would be a ten mill tax levied each year for a ten-year period. Twenty years later we still St. Paul The next move -in Governor Luther Youngdahl's at- tempt to force the discharge of Charles Foster, executive secretary of the Minnesota state investment have the problem of the sinking board, .appeared today to be up to fund levy. torney General Fred Howser. Cohen's shoulder was shattered by the blast, fired by gunmen stand- ing across the street from the night club. The other three victims are attorney general's agent Harry Cooper, who was assigned the day before the shooting to guard the gambler; Edward "Neddie" Herbert, one of Cohen's associates, and Dee David, a former singer and bit actress. They were wounded criti- cally but are recovering. WEATHER FEDERAL FORECASTS Winona and Vicinity Partly cloudy and warmer tonight and Sunday with ra chance of local iiundershowers Sunday afternoon. Low tonight 66. High Sunday 85. LOCAL WEATHER, Official observations for the 24 sours ending at 12 m. today: Maximum, 86; minimum, 59; noon, 86; precipitation, none; sun sets to- night at sun rises tomorrow at Additional weather on Page 12. Admittedly, higher costs than anticipated in building entered into the picture, but also, in 1933 the state income tax came into effect and helped the schools to a great extent. State aids were increased by the last legislature, along with in- creased state taxes to be borne in the' following year, and federal aids were increased. Nevertheless, we are confronted with the largest school budget in history, plus a tax for the school building fund. Resources Limited Winona has limited resources and it will be of little avail to continue expanding our schools, thereby in- creasing taxes, to the point where there will be fewer and fewer fami- lies to Winona willing to carry the burden. If there are no industries and no jobs there will be no chil- dren to fill our schools. For the past several years the schools have received a great deal of attention, justifiably, but the time has come when other functions, indirectly waring on the school situation, must je considered, such as. sidewalks, son, secretary of the Minnesota sewers, water mains and other fact- State Federation of Labor. Foster has stated that Schmahl, King and Lawson told him to omit Friday morning, the state execu- tive council, Foster's official em- ployer, rejected the governor's demand for the secretary's ouster. Members of the council are the governor, who is chairman; State Auditor Stafford King, State Treas- urer Julius Schmahl, Attorney Gen- eral J. A. A. Burnquist and Secre- tary of State Mike Holm. The gov- ernor, King, Schmahl and Burn- quist are members of the investment board along with George W. Law- the purchase authorization from the official minutes. The governor's four colleagues on the executive council indicated fol- lowing their meeting Friday that they intended no action on the gov- ernor's ouster ultimatum. (At the council's meeting, Burn- quist asserted that full details of ;he governor's charges should have jeen given to Foster m writing. Asking "what constitutes a public the attorney general said the legal phases of the matter should be gone into more fully.) lities, which must also come out of the tax dollar. Winona now has the second high- est per pupil unit maintenance cost of ten Minnesota cities studied, as compared with the state average of Of the same ten cities, Winona is seventh in per capita worth (wealth) but Is second n school plant investment. Winona had, for the last year comparative figures could be ob- tained, 147 teachers for stu- dents. St. Cloud had 124 teachers lor .students and Rochester (Continued on Page 3, Column 2.) TAXPAYERS   

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